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Structural Engineering for Architects

Book Description

This book provides an understanding of the fundamental theories and practice behind the creation of architectural structures. It aids the development of an intuitive understanding of structural engineering, bringing together technical and design issues.

The book is divided into four sections: "Structures in nature" looks at structural principles found in natural objects. "Theory" covers general structural theory as well as explaining the main forces encountered in engineering. "Structural prototypes" includes examples of modelmaking and load testing that can be carried out by students. The fourth section, "Case studies", presents a diverse range of examples from around the world – actual buildings that apply the theories and testing described in the previous sections.

This accessible, informative text is illustrated with specially drawn diagrams, models, CAD visualizations, construction details, and photographs of completed buildings. This book will give students and newly qualified architects a firm grasp of this essential topic.

Table of Contents

  1. Cover
  2. Copyright
  3. Title Page
  4. Contents
  5. Introduction
  6. 1. Structures in nature
    1. 1.1 Tree
    2. 1.2 Spiderweb
    3. 1.3 Eggshell
    4. 1.4 Soap bubbles
    5. 1.5 Human body
  7. 2. Theory
    1. 2.1 General theory of structures
      1. 2.1.1 Introduction
      2. 2.1.2 External loads
      3. 2.1.3 Internal forces
        1. 2.1.3.1 Axial
        2. 2.1.3.2 Shear
        3. 2.1.3.3 Bending
        4. 2.1.3.4 Torsion
        5. 2.1.3.5 Static equilibrium
        6. 2.1.3.6 Simple analysis
        7. 2.1.3.7 Common beam formulae
      4. 2.1.4 Material properties
        1. 2.1.4.1 Stress
        2. 2.1.4.2 Strain
        3. 2.1.4.3 Steel properties
        4. 2.1.4.4 Concrete properties
        5. 2.1.4.5 Timber properties
      5. 2.1.5 Sectional properties
        1. 2.1.5.1 Bending
        2. 2.1.5.2 Axial compression
        3. 2.1.5.3 Deflection
      6. 2.1.6 Fitness for purpose
        1. 2.1.6.1 Vertical deflection
        2. 2.1.6.2 Lateral deflection
        3. 2.1.6.3 Vibration
      7. 2.1.7 Structures
        1. 2.1.7.1 Categories of structure
        2. 2.1.7.2 Stability
        3. 2.1.7.3 Towers
    2. 2.2 Structural systems
      1. 2.2.1 Introduction
      2. 2.2.2 Material assessments
      3. 2.2.3 Structural components
        1. 2.2.3.1 Beam systems
        2. 2.2.3.2 Concrete slab systems
  8. 3. Structural prototypes
    1. 3.1 Form finding
    2. 3.2 Load testing
    3. 3.3 Visualizing forces
  9. 4. Case studies
    1. 4.1 Introduction
    2. 4.2 1850–1949
      1. 4.2.1 Viollet-le-Duc’s innovative engineering approaches
      2. 4.2.2 St. Pancras Railway Station Shed
      3. 4.2.3 Eiffel Tower
      4. 4.2.4 Forth Rail Bridge
      5. 4.2.5 All-Russia Exhibition
      6. 4.2.6 Tetrahedral Tower
      7. 4.2.7 Magazzini Generali Warehouse
      8. 4.2.8 Zarzuela Hippodrome
    3. 4.3 1950–1999
      1. 4.3.1 Crown Hall, Illinois Institute of Technology (IIT)
      2. 4.3.2 Los Manantiales Restaurant
      3. 4.3.3 Concrete Shell Structures, England
      4. 4.3.4 Geodesic Domes
      5. 4.3.5 Palazzo del Lavoro (Palace of Labor)
      6. 4.3.6 Concrete Shell Structures, Switzerland
      7. 4.3.7 Jefferson National Expansion Monument (“Gateway Arch”)
      8. 4.3.8 Maxi/Mini/Midi Systems
      9. 4.3.9 Tensegrity Structures
      10. 4.3.10 Munich Olympic Stadium Roof
      11. 4.3.11 Bini Domes—inflatable formwork
      12. 4.3.12 Niterói Contemporary Art Museum
      13. 4.3.13 Structural Glass
    4. 4.4 2000–2010
      1. 4.4.1 Ontario College of Art and Design expansion, featuring the Sharp Centre for Design
      2. 4.4.2 Atlas Building
      3. 4.4.3 “Het Gebouw” (The Building)
      4. 4.4.4 Hemeroscopium House
      5. 4.4.5 Kanagawa Institute of Technology (KAIT) Workshop/ Table
      6. 4.4.6 Meads Reach Footbridge
      7. 4.4.7 Pompidou-Metz
      8. 4.4.8 Burj Khalifa
  10. Further reading and resources
  11. Index
  12. Picture credits and acknowledgments