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Statistical and Managerial Techniques for Six Sigma Methodology: Theory and Application by Eva Lo Franco, Stefano Barone

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Chapter 1

Six Sigma Methodology

1.1 Management by Process

The application of Six Sigma always involves the implementation of a path: that is, the development of a coherent set of activities that together help to achieve one or more planned results (see Section 1.3.2). On the other hand, Six Sigma projects always involve one or more business processes and related performance. Therefore, an understanding of the methodology cannot ignore the study of the concept of ‘process’ and the deepening of methods and tools for its management.

1.1.1 The Concept of ‘Process’

Any process in its simplest form can be illustrated as in Figure 1.1. A process is a logically consistent and repeatable sequence of activities that allow the transformation of specified inputs (or resources) into desired output (or results), and generating value. Some activities may also run in parallel.

Figure 1.1 A generic process.

1.1

Inputs, outputs and the value generated by the process must be measurable. Moreover, a process has a well-defined beginning and end, Finally, for each activity its manager is defined, that is the person who is responsible for its performance. Accordingly, defining a process is a way of answering the question: ‘who does what?’

1.1.2 Managing by Process

Managing by process is a principle of management of the organisation as a whole; it involves the design of the processes of the organisation, ...

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