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SQL Server MVP Deep Dives Vol. 2 by Kimberly Tripp, Paul Randal, Paul Nielsen, Brad McGehee, Greg Low, Louis Davidson, Kalen Delaney

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Chapter 23. Creating your own data type

Hugo Kornelis

In SQL Server 2005, a new feature was introduced: Common Language Runtime (CLR) integration. Some people, mainly .NET developers, were enthusiastic, because they hoped they’d never need to write another line of SQL code. They were wrong. SQL code is still the best way to manipulate data. Other people, mainly DBAs, were afraid that their database would be swamped with code in all kinds of obscure .NET languages, causing them to lose all control over the data. They were wrong, too. The DBA has to enable CLR integration, and the default permission set for CLR assemblies doesn’t even allow any data access.

CLR integration came in five flavors. Three of them already existed in T-SQL flavor: ...

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