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SPSS For Dummies®, 2nd Edition

Book Description

The fun and friendly guide to the world's leading statistical software

Predictive Analysis Software (PASW), formerly SPSS software, is the leading statistical software used by commerical, government, and academic organizations around the world to solve business and research problems. It allows you to quickly and easily discover new insights from data, test hypotheses, and build powerful predictive models.

PASW Statistics For Dummies covers everything you need to know to get up and running with this efficient and practical software.*

*

  • PASW Statistics is the leading statistical software used to analyze data and create predictive models; it is used by business, academic, and government entities worldwide*

  • This guide explains how to work with automatic codebook generation and customize the variable view*

  • Walks you through the rounding method that is used in all calculations and explains using predictive analysis*

  • Shows how to maximize your use of graph templates, and much more*

Even if you have little or no statistical or mathematical background, PASW Statistics For Dummies will show you how to generate statistical support and decision-making information quickly and easily.

Table of Contents

  1. Copyright
  2. About the Author
  3. Author's Acknowledgments
  4. Publisher's Acknowledgments
  5. Introduction
    1. About This Book
    2. About the Data
    3. Who This Book Is For
    4. How This Book Is Organized
      1. Part I: The Fundamental Mechanics of SPSS
      2. Part II: Getting Data In and Out of SPSS
      3. Part III: Graphing Data
      4. Part IV: Analysis
      5. Part V: Programming SPSS with Command Syntax
      6. Part VI: Programming SPSS with Python and Scripts
      7. Part VII: The Part of Tens
    5. Icons Used in This Book
    6. Where to Go from Here
  6. I. The Fundamental Mechanics of SPSS
    1. 1. Introducing IBM SPSS Statistics
      1. 1.1. Garbage In, Garbage Out
      2. 1.2. Where Did SPSS Come From?
      3. 1.3. The Four Ways to Talk to SPSS
      4. 1.4. What You Can and Cannot Do with SPSS
      5. 1.5. How SPSS Works
      6. 1.6. Where SPSS Works
      7. 1.7. All the Strange Words
      8. 1.8. All Those Files
      9. 1.9. Where to Get Help When You Need It
      10. 1.10. Your Most Valuable Possession
      11. 1.11. You Can Dive as Deep as You Want to Go
    2. 2. Installing Software and Setting Options
      1. 2.1. Getting SPSS into Your Computer
        1. 2.1.1. What you need for running SPSS
        2. 2.1.2. Cranking up the installer
        3. 2.1.3. The SPSS installation sequence
        4. 2.1.4. Late Registration
      2. 2.2. Starting SPSS
      3. 2.3. Exploring and Modifying the Default Settings
        1. 2.3.1. General options
        2. 2.3.2. Viewer options
        3. 2.3.3. Data options
        4. 2.3.4. Currency options
        5. 2.3.5. Output Labels options
        6. 2.3.6. Chart options
        7. 2.3.7. Pivot Tables options
        8. 2.3.8. File Locations options
        9. 2.3.9. Scripts options
        10. 2.3.10. Multiple Imputations options
        11. 2.3.11. Syntax Editor options
    3. 3. A Simple Statistical Analysis Example
      1. 3.1. When the Tanana at Nenana Thaws
      2. 3.2. Entering the Data
        1. 3.2.1. Entering the data definitions
        2. 3.2.2. Entering the actual data
      3. 3.3. The Most Likely Hour
      4. 3.4. Transforming Data
      5. 3.5. The Two Kinds of Numbers
      6. 3.6. The Day It Is Most Likely to Happen
  7. II. Getting Data In and Out of SPSS
    1. 4. Entering Data from the Keyboard
      1. 4.1. The Variable View Is for Entering Variable Definitions
        1. 4.1.1. Name
        2. 4.1.2. Type
        3. 4.1.3. Width
        4. 4.1.4. Decimals
        5. 4.1.5. Label
        6. 4.1.6. Value
        7. 4.1.7. Missing
        8. 4.1.8. Columns
        9. 4.1.9. Align
        10. 4.1.10. Measure
        11. 4.1.11. Role
      2. 4.2. The Data View Is for Entering and Viewing Data Items
      3. 4.3. Filling In Missed Categorical Values
    2. 5. Reading and Writing Files
      1. 5.1. The SPSS File Format
      2. 5.2. Formatting a Text File for Input into SPSS
      3. 5.3. Reading Simple Data from a Text File
      4. 5.4. Transferring Data from Another Program
        1. 5.4.1. Reading an Excel file
        2. 5.4.2. Reading from an unknown program type
      5. 5.5. Saving Data and Images
    3. 6. Data and Data Types
      1. 6.1. Dates and Times
      2. 6.2. Time Schedule
      3. 6.3. Creating a Multiple Response Set
      4. 6.4. Copying Data Properties
    4. 7. Messing with the Data After It's in There
      1. 7.1. Sorting Cases
      2. 7.2. Counting Case Occurrences
      3. 7.3. Recoding Variables
        1. 7.3.1. Recoding into the same variables
        2. 7.3.2. Recoding into different variables
        3. 7.3.3. Automatic recoding
      4. 7.4. Binning
    5. 8. Getting Data Out of SPSS
      1. 8.1. Printing
      2. 8.2. Exporting to a Database
      3. 8.3. Using SPSS Viewer
        1. 8.3.1. Creating an HTML Web page file
        2. 8.3.2. Creating a text file
        3. 8.3.3. Creating an Excel file
        4. 8.3.4. Creating a Word document file
        5. 8.3.5. Creating a PowerPoint slide document
        6. 8.3.6. Creating a PDF document
      4. 8.4. Creating a Graphics File
  8. III. Graphing Data
    1. 9. Fundamentals of Graphing
      1. 9.1. Building Graphs the Easy Way
        1. 9.1.1. Gallery tab
        2. 9.1.2. Basic Elements tab
        3. 9.1.3. Groups/Point ID tab
        4. 9.1.4. Titles and footnotes tab
        5. 9.1.5. Element Properties dialog box
        6. 9.1.6. Options
      2. 9.2. Building Graphs the Fast Way
      3. 9.3. Building Graphs the Old-Fashioned Way
      4. 9.4. Editing a Graph
    2. 10. Some Types of Graphs
      1. 10.1. Line Chart
        1. 10.1.1. Simple line charts
        2. 10.1.2. Charts with multiple lines
      2. 10.2. Scatterplots
        1. 10.2.1. Simple scatterplots
        2. 10.2.2. Scatterplots with multiple variables
        3. 10.2.3. Simple three-dimensional scatterplots
        4. 10.2.4. Grouped three-dimensional scatterplots
        5. 10.2.5. Summary Point plots
        6. 10.2.6. Simple Dot plots
        7. 10.2.7. Scatterplot matrices
        8. 10.2.8. Drop-line charts
      3. 10.3. Bar Graphs
        1. 10.3.1. Simple bar graphs
        2. 10.3.2. Clustered bar charts
        3. 10.3.3. Stacked bar charts
        4. 10.3.4. Simple three-dimensional bar charts
        5. 10.3.5. Clustered three-dimensional bar charts
        6. 10.3.6. Stacked three-dimensional bar charts
        7. 10.3.7. Simple error bars
        8. 10.3.8. Clustered error bars
    3. 11. More Types of Graphs
      1. 11.1. Histograms
        1. 11.1.1. Simple histograms
        2. 11.1.2. Stacked histograms
        3. 11.1.3. Frequency polygons
        4. 11.1.4. Population pyramids
      2. 11.2. Area Graphs
        1. 11.2.1. Simple area graphs
        2. 11.2.2. Stacked area charts
      3. 11.3. Pie Charts
      4. 11.4. Boxplots
        1. 11.4.1. Simple boxplots
        2. 11.4.2. Clustered boxplots
        3. 11.4.3. One-dimensional boxplots
      5. 11.5. High-Low Graphs
        1. 11.5.1. High-low-close graphs
        2. 11.5.2. Simple range bar graphs
        3. 11.5.3. Clustered range bar graphs
        4. 11.5.4. Differenced area graphs
      6. 11.6. Dual-Axis Graphs
        1. 11.6.1. Dual Y-axes with categorical X-axis
        2. 11.6.2. Dual Y-axes with scale X-axis
  9. IV. Analysis
    1. 12. Executing an Analysis
      1. 12.1. Generating Reports
        1. 12.1.1. Processing summaries
        2. 12.1.2. Case summaries
        3. 12.1.3. Summaries in rows
        4. 12.1.4. Summaries in columns
        5. 12.1.5. OLAP cubes
      2. 12.2. Modifying Pivot Tables
    2. 13. Some Analysis Examples
      1. 13.1. Comparison of Means Analyses
        1. 13.1.1. Simple means compare
        2. 13.1.2. One-sample T test
        3. 13.1.3. Independent-samples T test
        4. 13.1.4. Paired-samples T test
        5. 13.1.5. One-way ANOVA
      2. 13.2. Linear Model Analyses
        1. 13.2.1. One variable
        2. 13.2.2. More than one variable
      3. 13.3. Correlation Analyses
        1. 13.3.1. Bivariate
        2. 13.3.2. Partial correlation
      4. 13.4. Regression Analyses
        1. 13.4.1. Linear
        2. 13.4.2. Curve estimation
      5. 13.5. Log Linear Analyses
  10. V. Programming SPSS with Command Syntax
    1. 14. The Command Syntax Language
      1. 14.1. Commands
      2. 14.2. Keywords
      3. 14.3. Variables and Constants
      4. 14.4. Data Declaration
      5. 14.5. Comments
      6. 14.6. The Execution of Commands
      7. 14.7. Flow Control and Conditional Execution
        1. 14.7.1. IF
        2. 14.7.2. DO IF
        3. 14.7.3. SELECT IF
        4. 14.7.4. DO REPEAT
        5. 14.7.5. LOOP
        6. 14.7.6. BREAK
      8. 14.8. Files
        1. 14.8.1. GET
        2. 14.8.2. IMPORT
        3. 14.8.3. SAVE
        4. 14.8.4. EXPORT
    2. 15. Command Syntax Language Examples
      1. 15.1. Writing a Syntax Command Program
      2. 15.2. Saving and Restoring Programs
      3. 15.3. Adding a Syntax Program to the Menu
      4. 15.4. Where to Find Syntax Commands
      5. 15.5. Doing Several Things at Once
      6. 15.6. Graphing Q-Q and P-P Plots
      7. 15.7. Splitting Cases
      8. 15.8. Examining Data
  11. VI. Programming SPSS with Python and Scripts
    1. 16. The Python Programming Language
      1. 16.1. Instructing Python: You Type It In and Python Does It
      2. 16.2. Understanding the Way Python Does Arithmetic
      3. 16.3. Understanding the Way Python Handles Words
      4. 16.4. Understanding the Way Python Handles Lists
      5. 16.5. Making Functions
      6. 16.6. Making Decisions with if/else
      7. 16.7. Doing It Over Again with for and while
    2. 17. Python inside SPSS
      1. 17.1. Installing Python for SPSS
      2. 17.2. Using a Language inside a Language
        1. 17.2.1. Finding out about modules
        2. 17.2.2. Installing more modules
      3. 17.3. Executing Multiple Commands with One Submit
      4. 17.4. Working with SPSS Variables
      5. 17.5. Accessing SPSS from Outside
    3. 18. Scripts
      1. 18.1. Picking Up BASIC
      2. 18.2. Scripting Fundamentals
        1. 18.2.1. Software classes, objects, and references
        2. 18.2.2. The classes of SPSS
        3. 18.2.3. Properties and methods
      3. 18.3. Creating a New Script
      4. 18.4. Automatic Scripts
  12. VII. The Part of Tens
    1. 19. Ten (or So) Modules You Can Add to SPSS
      1. 19.1. Amos
      2. 19.2. Direct Marketing
      3. 19.3. SPSS Missing Values
      4. 19.4. SPSS Data Collection Data Entry
      5. 19.5. SPSS Regression
      6. 19.6. SPSS Advanced Statistics
      7. 19.7. SPSS Exact Tests
      8. 19.8. SPSS Categories
      9. 19.9. SPSS Conjoint
      10. 19.10. SPSS Neural Networks
      11. 19.11. SPSS Forecasting
    2. 20. Ten Useful SPSS Things You Can Find on the Internet
      1. 20.1. SPSS Humor
      2. 20.2. The SPSS Home Page
      3. 20.3. SPSS Developer Center
      4. 20.4. User Groups
      5. 20.5. Mailing Lists and News Groups
      6. 20.6. Python Programming
      7. 20.7. Script and Syntax Programming
      8. 20.8. Tutorials for SPSS and Statistics
      9. 20.9. SPSS Wiki
      10. 20.10. PSPP, a Free SPSS
  13. glossary