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Spam Kings by Brian S McWilliams

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Shiksaa, the Spammer Tracker

Though she was a quick study, Shiksaa's first attempts at anti-spamming were fraught with rookie mistakes. On one occasion she angrily LARTed (filed an abuse report about) a company that had sent her spam and was later forced sheepishly to confess to Nanae that she had voluntarily signed up to receive mailings from the firm. Another time a Nanae veteran chewed her out for posting a 700-line message containing the entire contents of a FAQ on spam, rather than just providing a hyperlink to the document. Her tendency to become verbally combative when insulted or threatened also put her at odds with some newsgroup participants. When one of Nanae's resident trolls—a term used to describe newsgroup users who posted messages aimed at annoying other participants—argued once that anti-spammers were akin to the Ku Klux Klan, Shiksaa launched into a vehement counter-attack.

"Your mistake is that you assume anyone cares what you think," Shiksaa snapped back. "When you stop talking out of your derrière and want to help stamp out spam, come on back," she wrote.[3] The man responded by addressing her as "whorebot" and deriding her behavior as "typical of juniors enlisted into vigilante causes." The conversation (or thread in Usenet-speak) ended after several Nanae regulars rallied to Shiksaa's defense.

Though it didn't stanch the flow of junk email into her AOL account, Shiksaa found herself spending a couple of hours each day reading and commenting on Nanae. She enjoyed ...

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