You are previewing SolidWorks® Surfacing and Complex Shape Modeling Bible.
O'Reilly logo
SolidWorks® Surfacing and Complex Shape Modeling Bible

Book Description

If you want to gain proficiency and expertise with SolidWorks surface modeling, this is the resource for you. You'll learn how to apply concepts, utilize tools, and combine techniques and strategies in hands-on tutorials. This Bible covers the range from sketching splines and shelling to modeling blends and decorative features. Complete with professional tips and real-world examples, this inclusive guide enables you to coax more out of SolidWorks surfacing tools.

Table of Contents

  1. Copyright
  2. About the Author
  3. Credits
  4. Preface
  5. Acknowledgments
  6. I. Laying the Groundwork
    1. 1. Understanding Basic Concepts
      1. 1.1. Assumed Basic Skills
      2. 1.2. Concepts, Tools, Techniques, and Strategies
      3. 1.3. Understanding the Difference Between Design and Modeling
      4. 1.4. Summary
    2. 2. Surfacing Primer
      1. 2.1. What are Surfaces?
        1. 2.1.1. Infinitely thin
        2. 2.1.2. Stand–alone faces
      2. 2.2. Surfacing: One Stop in the Evolution of CAD
      3. 2.3. Choosing Solids or Surfaces
        1. 2.3.1. Assessing strengths and weaknesses
        2. 2.3.2. How to choose
      4. 2.4. Surfacing Theory and Concepts
        1. 2.4.1. Algebraic and NURBS surfaces
          1. 2.4.1.1. U–V isoparameter curves
          2. 2.4.1.2. The degenerate condition
        2. 2.4.2. Trimmed surfaces
          1. 2.4.2.1. Understanding the B–rep
          2. 2.4.2.2. Imported geometry and Untrim
          3. 2.4.2.3. Extending faces
        3. 2.4.3. Mesh and subdivision surfaces
          1. 2.4.3.1. Converting mesh data types
          2. 2.4.3.2. Displaying surface data
      5. 2.5. Understanding Curvature Continuity
        1. 2.5.1. What causes edges?
        2. 2.5.2. Types of curvature transitions
        3. 2.5.3. Algebraic versus interpolated geometry
      6. 2.6. Summary
  7. II. Understanding the Tools
    1. 3. Sketching with Splines
      1. 3.1. Why Splines?
        1. 3.1.1. Types of splines
          1. 3.1.1.1. 2D and 3D
          2. 3.1.1.2. User–drawn splines
          3. 3.1.1.3. Converted splines
          4. 3.1.1.4. Face curves
          5. 3.1.1.5. Auto Trace
          6. 3.1.1.6. Intersection curves
          7. 3.1.1.7. Fit spline
      2. 3.2. Anatomy of a Spline
        1. 3.2.1. Tangency Handle
        2. 3.2.2. Control Polygon
        3. 3.2.3. Spline evaluation tools
          1. 3.2.3.1. Curvature Comb
          2. 3.2.3.2. Inflection Point indicator
          3. 3.2.3.3. Minimum Radius indicator
          4. 3.2.3.4. Spline PropertyManager
      3. 3.3. Controlling Splines
        1. 3.3.1. Drawing splines
          1. 3.3.1.1. Click–click or click–drag?
          2. 3.3.1.2. Ending a spline
          3. 3.3.1.3. Draw a J
          4. 3.3.1.4. Controlling end tangency
          5. 3.3.1.5. Smooth corners
          6. 3.3.1.6. Adding internal spline points
          7. 3.3.1.7. Removing points, trimming and extending splines
          8. 3.3.1.8. Closed–loop splines
          9. 3.3.1.9. Tangency handles on internal spline points
          10. 3.3.1.10. PropertyManager controls
            1. 3.3.1.10.1. Existing Relations
            2. 3.3.1.10.2. Add Relations
            3. 3.3.1.10.3. Options
            4. 3.3.1.10.4. Parameters
            5. 3.3.1.10.5. Simplify Spline
      4. 3.4. Fully Defining Spline Sketches
      5. 3.5. Tutorials
        1. 3.5.1. Tutorial 3.1: The S spline
        2. 3.5.2. Tutorial 3.2: Tracing shapes
      6. 3.6. Summary
    2. 4. Sketching in 3D
      1. 4.1. Getting Started in a 3D Sketch
        1. 4.1.1. Using planes in a 3D sketch
          1. 4.1.1.1. Using standard reference planes
          2. 4.1.1.2. 3D planes
      2. 4.2. Editing and Visualization Techniques
        1. 4.2.1. Using the Shift–Arrow technique
        2. 4.2.2. Using viewports
      3. 4.3. Working within the limitations of 3D Sketches
        1. 4.3.1. Limitations in 3D sketches
        2. 4.3.2. Recently removed limitations
      4. 4.4. Using Special 3D Sketch Tools
        1. 4.4.1. Intersection Curve
        2. 4.4.2. Spline On Surface
        3. 4.4.3. Face Curves
        4. 4.4.4. Convert Entities
      5. 4.5. Tutorials
        1. 4.5.1. Tutorial 4.1: Fluorescent light bulb
        2. 4.5.2. Tutorial 4.2: Complex spring
      6. 4.6. Summary
    3. 5. Creating Curves
      1. 5.1. Using the Helix/Spiral Feature
        1. 5.1.1. Helix feature options
        2. 5.1.2. Spiral options
      2. 5.2. Creating a Projected Curve
        1. 5.2.1. Sketch Onto Face
        2. 5.2.2. Sketch Onto Sketch
      3. 5.3. Curve Through Reference Points
      4. 5.4. Curve Through XYZ Points
      5. 5.5. Creating Composite Curves
      6. 5.6. Split Lines
      7. 5.7. Tutorial
      8. 5.8. Summary
    4. 6. Using the Primary Shape Creation Features
      1. 6.1. Choosing Which Feature to Use
        1. 6.1.1. Selecting a sweep
        2. 6.1.2. Selecting a loft
        3. 6.1.3. Selecting the Boundary surface
          1. 6.1.3.1. Smoothness
          2. 6.1.3.2. Curve arrangements
          3. 6.1.3.3. Trim with connectors
          4. 6.1.3.4. Other issues with the Boundary feature
        4. 6.1.4. Selecting the Fill surface
      2. 6.2. Using Sweeps
        1. 6.2.1. Orientation and Twist Type options
          1. 6.2.1.1. Follow Path
            1. 6.2.1.1.1. Path Alignment Type
          2. 6.2.1.2. Keep Normal Constant
          3. 6.2.1.3. Follow Path and 1st Guide Curve
          4. 6.2.1.4. Follow 1st and 2nd Guide Curves
          5. 6.2.1.5. Twist Along Path
          6. 6.2.1.6. Twist Along Path With Normal Constant
        2. 6.2.2. Merge Tangent Faces
        3. 6.2.3. Show Preview
        4. 6.2.4. Merge Result
        5. 6.2.5. Align With End Faces
        6. 6.2.6. Guide curves
          1. 6.2.6.1. The Pierce constraint and feature order
          2. 6.2.6.2. Consumed curves, rollback, and reuse
        7. 6.2.7. Thin Features and Solid Sweep
        8. 6.2.8. Start and end tangency
      3. 6.3. Using Lofts
        1. 6.3.1. Using loft profiles
          1. 6.3.1.1. Using the Drag Sketch option
          2. 6.3.1.2. Using Add Loft Section
          3. 6.3.1.3. Using the SelectionManager
        2. 6.3.2. Start and end constraints
        3. 6.3.3. Guide curves
        4. 6.3.4. Using the centerline parameters
        5. 6.3.5. Options
          1. 6.3.5.1. Merge Tangent Faces
          2. 6.3.5.2. Close Loft
          3. 6.3.5.3. Preview
        6. 6.3.6. Right Mouse Button menu options
          1. 6.3.6.1. Connectors
          2. 6.3.6.2. Mesh preview
          3. 6.3.6.3. Zebra Stripe Preview
          4. 6.3.6.4. Opaque and Transparent Preview
      4. 6.4. Using the Boundary Surface Feature
        1. 6.4.1. Using the Curve Selection boxes
        2. 6.4.2. Using connectors
        3. 6.4.3. Curves Influence Type
        4. 6.4.4. Options and preview
        5. 6.4.5. Display
      5. 6.5. Using the Fill Surface Feature
        1. 6.5.1. Edge settings
          1. 6.5.1.1. Alternate Face
          2. 6.5.1.2. Apply To All Edges
          3. 6.5.1.3. Optimize Surface
          4. 6.5.1.4. Preview options
          5. 6.5.1.5. Constraint curves
          6. 6.5.1.6. Resolution Control
          7. 6.5.1.7. Options
          8. 6.5.1.8. Reverse Direction
      6. 6.6. Summary
    5. 7. Using Advanced Fillets
      1. 7.1. Differentiating Fillet Functions
        1. 7.1.1. Arc–based fillets
        2. 7.1.2. Spline–based fillets
      2. 7.2. Using Fillet Options
        1. 7.2.1. Constant Radius fillet
          1. 7.2.1.1. Multiple Radius fillet
          2. 7.2.1.2. Setback fillet
          3. 7.2.1.3. Selection options
        2. 7.2.2. Variable Radius fillet
        3. 7.2.3. Face fillet
          1. 7.2.3.1. Curvature Continuous fillet
          2. 7.2.3.2. Constant Width fillet
          3. 7.2.3.3. Hold Line fillet
        4. 7.2.4. Full Round fillet
      3. 7.3. FilletXpert
      4. 7.4. Fillet Best Practice Recommendations
      5. 7.5. Tutorial
      6. 7.6. Summary
    6. 8. Shelling
      1. 8.1. Thinking about the Manufacturing Process
      2. 8.2. Using Shelling Options
        1. 8.2.1. Removing faces
        2. 8.2.2. Multi–thickness shell
        3. 8.2.3. Shell Outward
      3. 8.3. Diagnosing Shell Problems
        1. 8.3.1. Error Diagnostics
        2. 8.3.2. The Check tool
        3. 8.3.3. Repairing the model
      4. 8.4. Shelling Manually
      5. 8.5. Tutorial
        1. 8.5.1. Tutorial: Troubleshooting and manual shelling
      6. 8.6. Summary
  8. III. Using Secondary, Management, and Evaluation Tools
    1. 9. Using Secondary Shape Creation Features
      1. 9.1. Using the Dome and Shape Features
        1. 9.1.1. Similarities between the Dome and Shape features
        2. 9.1.2. Differences between the Dome and Shape features
        3. 9.1.3. Dome
        4. 9.1.4. Shape
      2. 9.2. Using the Indent Feature
      3. 9.3. Using the Radiate Surface
      4. 9.4. Using the Ruled Surface
      5. 9.5. Tutorial
      6. 9.6. Summary
    2. 10. Working with Hybrid Features
      1. 10.1. Moving Between Solids and Surfaces
        1. 10.1.1. The three faces of hybrid modeling
          1. 10.1.1.1. Identifying sequential hybrid modeling tools
          2. 10.1.1.2. Identifying simultaneous hybrid modeling tools
          3. 10.1.1.3. Identifying hybrid features
        2. 10.1.2. Modeling efficiency
          1. 10.1.2.1. Sketch elements = solid faces
          2. 10.1.2.2. Comparing four methods
            1. 10.1.2.2.1. Alternative method #1 — Solids
            2. 10.1.2.2.2. Alternative method #2 — Up To Surface
            3. 10.1.2.2.3. Alternative method #3 — Cut With Surface
            4. 10.1.2.2.4. Alternative method #4 — Indent
          3. 10.1.2.3. Comparing methods to shorten the wall
            1. 10.1.2.3.1. Nested loop cut
            2. 10.1.2.3.2. Up To Next cut
            3. 10.1.2.3.3. Cut With Surface
            4. 10.1.2.3.4. Replace Face
            5. 10.1.2.3.5. Move Face
      2. 10.2. Extruding to Surfaces
      3. 10.3. Lofting Between Surfaces
      4. 10.4. Using Thicken for Bosses and Cuts
        1. 10.4.1. Removing an edge between faces
        2. 10.4.2. Using sub–surfaces to thicken small areas
        3. 10.4.3. Thickening corners
        4. 10.4.4. Thickened cuts
      5. 10.5. Using Replace Face
      6. 10.6. Using Advanced Options of the Fill Surface
        1. 10.6.1. Merge Result
        2. 10.6.2. Merge Result and Try To Form Solid
        3. 10.6.3. Fill and Delete Face
      7. 10.7. Using the Wrap Feature
        1. 10.7.1. Wrap options
          1. 10.7.1.1. Using Pull Direction
          2. 10.7.1.2. Using Scribe with surfaces
        2. 10.7.2. Wrap limitations
      8. 10.8. Tutorials
        1. 10.8.1. Tutorial 10.1: Plastic clip
        2. 10.8.2. Tutorial 10.2: Finial
      9. 10.9. Summary
    3. 11. Managing Surfaces
      1. 11.1. Copying, Merging, and Moving
        1. 11.1.1. Offset/Copy Surface
        2. 11.1.2. Knit
        3. 11.1.3. Move/Copy
      2. 11.2. Changing Boundaries
        1. 11.2.1. Trim
        2. 11.2.2. Untrim
        3. 11.2.3. Delete Hole
        4. 11.2.4. Extend
      3. 11.3. Tutorial
      4. 11.4. Summary
    4. 12. Using Direct Editing Tools
      1. 12.1. Using Move Face
      2. 12.2. Using Delete Face
        1. 12.2.1. Delete and Patch option
        2. 12.2.2. Delete option
        3. 12.2.3. Delete and Fill option
      3. 12.3. Using the Freeform Feature
        1. 12.3.1. Setting up the Freeform feature
        2. 12.3.2. Moving the points
          1. 12.3.2.1. Avoiding teeter tottering
          2. 12.3.2.2. Moving points with control
      4. 12.4. Using Flex
      5. 12.5. Using Deform
        1. 12.5.1. Deforming Curve To Curve
        2. 12.5.2. Deforming using a point
        3. 12.5.3. Deforming with Surface Push
      6. 12.6. Tutorial
      7. 12.7. Summary
    5. 13. Managing Bodies
      1. 13.1. Organizing Bodies
        1. 13.1.1. Using body folders
        2. 13.1.2. Naming bodies
      2. 13.2. Visualizing Bodies
        1. 13.2.1. Hide and Show bodies
        2. 13.2.2. Isolate
        3. 13.2.3. Using colors and appearances
      3. 13.3. Combining and Moving Bodies
        1. 13.3.1. Combining solid bodies
        2. 13.3.2. Combining surface bodies
        3. 13.3.3. Moving bodies
          1. 13.3.3.1. Translating and rotating by the numbers
          2. 13.3.3.2. Positioning bodies using mates
          3. 13.3.3.3. Copying bodies
          4. 13.3.3.4. Insert Part
      4. 13.4. Deleting Bodies
      5. 13.5. Tutorial
      6. 13.6. Summary
    6. 14. Evaluating Geometry
      1. 14.1. Using Model Quality Evaluation Methods
        1. 14.1.1. Verification On Rebuild
        2. 14.1.2. The Check tool
        3. 14.1.3. Feature Statistics
      2. 14.2. Using Shape and Continuity Evaluation Methods
        1. 14.2.1. Curvature Combs
        2. 14.2.2. Curvature display
        3. 14.2.3. Deviation Analysis
        4. 14.2.4. Zebra Stripes
        5. 14.2.5. Reflectivity/Specularity/RealView
        6. 14.2.6. Tangent Edge display
        7. 14.2.7. Face Curves
      3. 14.3. Using Plastics and Machining Evaluation Methods
        1. 14.3.1. Draft Analysis
        2. 14.3.2. Thickness Analysis
        3. 14.3.3. Undercut Analysis
        4. 14.3.4. DFM Analysis
      4. 14.4. Tutorial
      5. 14.5. Summary
  9. IV. Using Specialized Techniques
    1. 15. Modeling a Ladle
      1. 15.1. Getting Started with a Complex Model
        1. 15.1.1. Mapping major shapes to features
        2. 15.1.2. Preparing the layout
      2. 15.2. Modeling from the Available Data
        1. 15.2.1. Modeling Area 1: the bowl
        2. 15.2.2. Modeling Area 2: transition
        3. 15.2.3. Modeling Area 3: handle
        4. 15.2.4. Modeling Area 4: the cap off
        5. 15.2.5. Using the SelectionManager
      3. 15.3. Tidying up the Loose Ends
      4. 15.4. Summary
    2. 16. Modeling a Trowel
      1. 16.1. Modeling the Handle
      2. 16.2. Modeling the Scoop
      3. 16.3. Summary
    3. 17. Modeling Blends
      1. 17.1. Modeling a Plastic Cover
      2. 17.2. Tinkering with the Solid
      3. 17.3. Modeling a Stool Concept
      4. 17.4. Patching Bad Geometry
      5. 17.5. Summary
    4. 18. Modeling a Plastic Bottle
      1. 18.1. Laying Out the Task
        1. 18.1.1. Starting point affects results
        2. 18.1.2. Modeling scenarios
        3. 18.1.3. Modeling the unknown
      2. 18.2. Building the Model
      3. 18.3. Creating a Thread
      4. 18.4. Checking the Volume
      5. 18.5. Summary
    5. 19. Modeling Decorative Features
      1. 19.1. Modeling an Egg–and–Dart Pattern
        1. 19.1.1. Modeling the egg border
        2. 19.1.2. Modeling the egg
        3. 19.1.3. Modeling the dart
        4. 19.1.4. Comments on the construction
      2. 19.2. Modeling a Woven Pattern
      3. 19.3. Modeling a Flower–Trumpet Finial
      4. 19.4. Modeling a Fleur–de–Lis Decorative Piece
        1. 19.4.1. Building the first lobe
        2. 19.4.2. Building the second lobe
          1. 19.4.2.1. Controlling the U–V angles
          2. 19.4.2.2. The 3D sketch
        3. 19.4.3. The belt
          1. 19.4.3.1. Curve Through Reference Points
          2. 19.4.3.2. Mirror and Trim
        4. 19.4.4. The base
      5. 19.5. Modeling a Scroll
      6. 19.6. Modeling a Botanical Shape
      7. 19.7. Summary
    6. 20. Modeling Overmolded Geometry
      1. 20.1. Understanding the Overmold Process
      2. 20.2. Modeling a Toothbrush
      3. 20.3. Summary
    7. 21. Working from Digitized Data
      1. 21.1. Creating an Orange Juice Bottle
        1. 21.1.1. Accessing point cloud data
          1. 21.1.1.1. Options without ScanTo3D
          2. 21.1.1.2. Options with ScanTo3D
            1. 21.1.1.2.1. Creating surfaces
            2. 21.1.1.2.2. Creating curves
        2. 21.1.2. Model an orange juice bottle from a scanned data reference
      2. 21.2. Creating a Cast Iron Skillet Handle
      3. 21.3. Summary
    8. 22. Using Master Model Techniques
      1. 22.1. Understanding Master Model Tools
      2. 22.2. Differentiating Multi–body Parts and Assemblies
      3. 22.3. Using Push Type Master Model Tools
        1. 22.3.1. Using the Split feature
          1. 22.3.1.1. Details concerning the Split feature
          2. 22.3.1.2. Using the Split feature to create assemblies
        2. 22.3.2. Using the Save Bodies function
      4. 22.4. Using Pull Type Master Model Tools
        1. 22.4.1. Using Insert Part and Mirror Part
          1. 22.4.1.1. Details concerning inserted parts
          2. 22.4.1.2. Details concerning mirrored parts
        2. 22.4.2. Using Insert Into New Part
      5. 22.5. Tutorial
      6. 22.6. Summary
    9. 23. Post-Processing Data
      1. 23.1. Presenting Ideas with PhotoWorks
        1. 23.1.1. Selecting where you are on the continuum
        2. 23.1.2. Investing time
          1. 23.1.2.1. The "we gotta have it now" image
            1. 23.1.2.1.1. Perspective
            2. 23.1.2.1.2. Shadows
            3. 23.1.2.1.3. Edge Display
          2. 23.1.2.2. The five–minute warning
          3. 23.1.2.3. Quick renderings
          4. 23.1.2.4. A more considered rendering
            1. 23.1.2.4.1. Subject matter
            2. 23.1.2.4.2. Environment
            3. 23.1.2.4.3. Lighting
            4. 23.1.2.4.4. Realistic materials
            5. 23.1.2.4.5. Shadow quality
            6. 23.1.2.4.6. Depth of field
      2. 23.2. Communicating with eDrawings
        1. 23.2.1. Choosing the appropriate format for your data
        2. 23.2.2. Applications for eDrawings
        3. 23.2.3. Finding the functionality
      3. 23.3. Using 3D Instant Website
      4. 23.4. Using PowerPoint as a Communication Tool
      5. 23.5. Rapid Prototyping
      6. 23.6. What about Fully Dimensioned Prints?
      7. 23.7. Summary