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Software Defined Networks

Book Description

Software Defined Networks discusses the historical networking environment that gave rise to SDN, as well as the latest advances in SDN technology. The book gives you the state of the art knowledge needed for successful deployment of an SDN, including:

Table of Contents

  1. Cover image
  2. Title page
  3. Copyright
  4. Dedication
  5. Praise Page
  6. List of Figures
  7. List of Tables
  8. Foreword
  9. Preface
    1. Suggestions and Corrections
    2. About the Authors
    3. Acknowledgments
  10. Chapter 1. Introduction
    1. Abstract
    2. 1.1 Basic Packet-Switching Terminology
    3. 1.2 Historical Background
    4. 1.3 The Modern Data Center
    5. 1.4 Traditional Switch Architecture
    6. 1.5 Autonomous and Dynamic Forwarding Tables
    7. 1.6 Can We Increase the Packet-Forwarding IQ?
    8. 1.7 Open Source and Technological Shifts
    9. 1.8 Organization of this Book
    10. References
  11. Chapter 2. Why SDN?
    1. Abstract
    2. 2.1 Evolution of Switches and Control Planes
    3. 2.2 Cost
    4. 2.3 SDN Implications for Research and Innovation
    5. 2.4 Data Center Innovation
    6. 2.5 Data Center Needs
    7. 2.6 Conclusion
    8. References
  12. Chapter 3. The Genesis of SDN
    1. Abstract
    2. 3.1 The Evolution of Networking Technology
    3. 3.2 Forerunners of SDN
    4. 3.3 Software Defined Networking is Born
    5. 3.4 Sustaining SDN Interoperability
    6. 3.5 Open Source Contributions
    7. 3.6 Legacy Mechanisms Evolve Toward SDN
    8. 3.7 Network Virtualization
    9. 3.8 May I Please Call My Network SDN?
    10. 3.9 Conclusion
    11. References
  13. Chapter 4. How SDN Works
    1. Abstract
    2. 4.1 Fundamental Characteristics of SDN
    3. 4.2 SDN Operation
    4. 4.3 SDN Devices
    5. 4.4 SDN Controller
    6. 4.5 SDN Applications
    7. 4.6 Alternate SDN Methods
    8. 4.7 Conclusion
    9. References
  14. Chapter 5. The OpenFlow Specification
    1. Abstract
    2. 5.1 Chapter-Specific Terminology
    3. 5.2 OpenFlow Overview
    4. 5.3 OpenFlow 1.0 and OpenFlow Basics
    5. 5.4 OpenFlow 1.1 Additions
    6. 5.5 OpenFlow 1.2 Additions
    7. 5.6 OpenFlow 1.3 Additions
    8. 5.7 OpenFlow Limitations
    9. 5.8 Conclusion
    10. References
  15. Chapter 6. Alternative Definitions of SDN
    1. Abstract
    2. 6.1 Potential Drawbacks of Open SDN
    3. 6.2 SDN via APIs
    4. 6.3 SDN via Hypervisor-Based Overlays
    5. 6.4 SDN via Opening Up the Device
    6. 6.5 Network Functions Virtualization
    7. 6.6 Alternatives Overlap and Ranking
    8. 6.7 Conclusion
    9. References
  16. Chapter 7. SDN in the Data Center
    1. Abstract
    2. 7.1 Data Center Definition
    3. 7.2 Data Center Demands
    4. 7.3 Tunneling Technologies for the Data Center
    5. 7.4 Path Technologies in the Data Center
    6. 7.5 Ethernet Fabrics in the Data Center
    7. 7.6 SDN Use Cases in the Data Center
    8. 7.7 Open SDN versus Overlays in the Data Center
    9. 7.8 Real-World Data Center Implementations
    10. 7.9 Conclusion
    11. References
  17. Chapter 8. SDN in Other Environments
    1. Abstract
    2. Consistent Policy Configuration
    3. Global Network View
    4. 8.1 Wide Area Networks
    5. 8.2 Service Provider and Carrier Networks
    6. 8.3 Campus Networks
    7. 8.4 Hospitality Networks
    8. 8.5 Mobile Networks
    9. 8.6 In-Line Network Functions
    10. 8.7 Optical Networks
    11. 8.8 SDN vs. P2P/Overlay Networks
    12. 8.9 Conclusion
    13. References
  18. Chapter 9. Players in the SDN Ecosystem
    1. Abstract
    2. 9.1 Academic Research Institutions
    3. 9.2 Industry Research Labs
    4. 9.3 Network Equipment Manufacturers
    5. 9.4 Software Vendors
    6. 9.5 White-Box Switches
    7. 9.6 Merchant Silicon Vendors
    8. 9.7 Original Device Manufacturers
    9. 9.8 Enterprises
    10. 9.9 Standards Bodies and Industry Alliances
    11. 9.10 Conclusion
    12. References
  19. Chapter 10. SDN Applications
    1. Abstract
    2. 10.1 Before You Begin
    3. 10.2 Reactive versus Proactive Applications
    4. 10.3 Analyzing Simple SDN Applications
    5. 10.4 A Simple Reactive Java Application
    6. 10.5 Background on Controllers
    7. 10.6 Using the Floodlight Controller
    8. 10.7 Using the OpenDaylight Controller
    9. 10.8 Using the Cisco XNC Controller
    10. 10.9 Using the Hewlett-Packard Controller
    11. 10.10 Switch Considerations
    12. 10.11 Creating Network Virtualization Tunnels
    13. 10.12 Offloading Flows in the Data Center
    14. 10.13 Access Control for the Campus
    15. 10.14 Traffic Engineering for Service Providers
    16. 10.15 Conclusion
    17. References
  20. Chapter 11. SDN Open Source
    1. Abstract
    2. 11.1 Chapter-Specific Terminology
    3. 11.2 Open Source Licensing Issues
    4. 11.3 Profiles of SDN Open Source Users
    5. 11.4 OpenFlow Source Code
    6. 11.5 Switch Implementations
    7. 11.6 Controller Implementations
    8. 11.7 SDN Applications
    9. 11.8 Orchestration and Network Virtualization
    10. 11.9 Simulation, Testing, and Tools
    11. 11.10 OpenStack
    12. 11.11 Example: Applying SDN Open Source
    13. 11.12 Conclusion
    14. References
  21. Chapter 12. Business Ramifications
    1. Abstract
    2. 12.1 Everything as a Service
    3. 12.2 Market Sizing
    4. 12.3 Classifying SDN Vendors
    5. 12.4 Impact on Incumbent NEMs
    6. 12.5 Impact on Enterprise Consumers
    7. 12.6 Turmoil in the Networking Industry
    8. 12.7 Venture Capital
    9. 12.8 Major SDN Acquisitions
    10. 12.9 SDN Startups
    11. 12.10 Career Disruptions
    12. 12.11 Conclusion
    13. References
  22. Chapter 13. SDN Futures
    1. Abstract
    2. 13.1 Current State of Affairs
    3. 13.2 Potential Novel Applications of Open SDN
    4. 13.3 Conclusion
    5. References
  23. Appendix A. Acronyms and Abbreviations
  24. Appendix B. Blacklist Application
    1. B.1 MessageListener
    2. B.2 PacketHandler
    3. B.3 FlowManager
  25. Index