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Social Interactive Television: Immersive Shared Experiences and Perspectives

Book Description

Social Interactive Television: Immersive Shared Experiences and Perspectives combines academic and industry research to provide the first publication of its kind to discuss the future emergence of experiences and services through interactive television. This book provides practitioners, academicians, researchers, and developers with the most current findings on the topic.

Table of Contents

  1. Copyright
  2. Editorial Advisory Board
  3. Foreword
  4. Preface
    1. SOCIAL INTERACTIVE TELEVISION RESEARCH
    2. STRUCTURE OF THE BOOK
  5. Acknowledgment
  6. I. In Search of Social Television
    1. ABSTRACT
    2. INTRODUCTION
    3. HISTORY
    4. EXAMPLES
    5. DEFINITIONS
    6. DIMENSIONS
    7. CONCLUSION
    8. ACKNOWLEDGMENT
  7. REFERENCES
    1. ENDNOTES
  8. I. The Broad Picture: Frameworks and Applications
    1. II. Broadening the Effects of Broadcasting: How ITV can Collapse Distance and Transform Communication
      1. ABSTRACT
      2. INTRODUCTION
      3. THE IMPACT OF TECHNOLOGY ON HUMAN RELATIONSHIPS
      4. THE IMPORTANCE OF DESIGN
      5. RESPONSIVE TELEVISION AND EQUALIZATION OF EXPERIENCE
      6. ENHANCING SHARED EXPERIENCE WITH SHARED VIRTUAL SPACE
      7. BACKGROUND AWARENESS AND AMBIENT MEDIA
      8. MEETING NEW PEOPLE BY BECOMING A LOCAL BROADCASTER
      9. SUPPORTING COMMUNICATION WITH NOVEL INTERFACES
      10. FINAL THOUGHTS
      11. ACKNOWLEDGMENT
    2. REFERENCES
    3. III. Interactive TV Together: An Open Service Infrastructure for Enhancing Interactive TV Experiences
      1. ABSTRACT
      2. INTRODUCTION
      3. SERVICE INFRASTRUCTURE
        1. Metadata Integration Service
        2. Identity Management Service
        3. Session Management Service
        4. Personal Recommender Service
      4. PROTOTYPE
      5. IPTV FUTURES
      6. RELATED WORK
      7. CONCLUSION AND FUTURE WORK
      8. ACKNOWLEDGMENT
    4. REFERENCES
    5. IV. Social TV from a Computer-Supported Cooperative Work Perspective
      1. ABSTRACT
      2. INTRODUCTION
      3. SOCIAL TV
        1. Amigo TV
        2. Joost
        3. Babelgum
        4. Tribler
        5. Core Functionality of these Social TV Systems
      4. SOCIAL TV FROM A COMPUTER-SUPPORTED COOPERATIVE WORK PERSPECTIVE
        1. Advanced Social TV—A Scenario
        2. Advanced Social TV—Requirements from a CSCW Perspective
        3. Group Awareness
        4. Communication
        5. Seamless Integration
      5. THE CoMeST EXAMPLE: CONCEPT AND ARCHITECTURE
        1. Group Awareness and Communication by PRIMI
        2. Sensor-Based Seamless Integration by Sens-ation
        3. Advanced Social TV in CoMeST
      6. THE DESIGN SPACE OF TIME, SPACE AND CONNECTION FOR SOCIAL TV
        1. Time
        2. Space
        3. Connection
      7. CONCLUSION
    6. REFERENCES
    7. V. Television Content Enrichment and Sharing: The Ambulant Annotator
      1. ABSTRACT
      2. INTRODUCTION
      3. RELATED WORK
        1. Multimedia Authoring Systems
        2. Content Sharing
      4. AUTHORING FROM THE COUCH PARADIGM
        1. Definition
        2. Functionality
        3. Implications
      5. THE AMBULANT ANNOTATOR: SYSTEM ARCHITECTURE
      6. RESEARCH DIRECTIONS
        1. Enrichment of Enriched Presentations: Enrichment Lifecycle
        2. Personal vs. Shared Media
        3. Synchronous Television Watching
      7. CONCLUSION
      8. ACKNOWLEDGMENT
    8. REFERENCES
      1. ENDNOTES
  9. II. Who, What, Why and How? Methodology and Audience Studies
    1. VI. Sociability Heuristics for Evaluating Social Interactive Television Systems
      1. ABSTRACT
      2. INTRODUCTION
      3. THE SOCIAL USES OF (INTERACTIVE) TELEVISION
      4. EVALUATING SOCIABILITY
      5. SOCIABILITY HEURISTICS FOR SOCIAL INTERACTIVE TELEVISION
        1. Communication Modalities
        2. Presence and Awareness
        3. Synchronous vs. Asynchronous Use
        4. Remote vs. Collocated Interaction
        5. Information About Viewing Behaviour
        6. User Control
        7. Personal and Group Privacy
        8. Distraction
        9. Notifications
        10. Program Genres
        11. Sharing Content
        12. Sharing Activities
      6. CONCLUSION
    2. REFERENCES
      1. ENDNOTES
    3. VII. Audience Participation in Television and Internet: Attitudes and Practices of Young People in Portugal
      1. ABSTRACT
      2. INTRODUCTION
      3. BACKGROUND
      4. THE USES OF MEDIA AND ICT BY YOUNG PORTUGUESE: ETHNOGRAPHIC STUDY AND QUANTITATIVE INQUIRY
      5. PARTICIPATORY MEDIA FORMATS: CROSS-MEDIA FORMAT EVALUATION STUDY AND DIGITAL LITERACY INITIATIVE CASE STUDY
      6. CONCLUSION
    4. REFERENCES
    5. VIII. Methods for Involving Users in the Development of Social Interactive TV: Enhancing Usability and User Experience in Non-Traditional Environments
      1. ABSTRACT
      2. INTRODUCTION
      3. NON-TRADITIONAL ENVIRONMENTS
      4. USABILITY AND USER EXPERIENCE METHODS FOR SOCIAL ITV
        1. User-Centered Methods for Early Development Stages
        2. User-centered Methods for Late Development Phases
      5. CASE STUDIES FOR THE EARLY INVOLVEMENT OF USERS
        1. Creative Cultural and Playful Probing
        2. Co-Design Workshops
          1. 1st Step: Think about your Workshop—Goals and Participants
          2. 2nd Step: Select the Workshop Location
          3. 3rd Step (Set-Up): Adjust the Instant Cards to Your Workshop Goals
          4. 4th Step: Adjust the Workshop Phases to your Workshop Goals
          5. 5th Step: Consider the Outcome of the Workshop, Its Analysis and Further Use for Design
      6. METHODS APPLICABLE DURING THE IMPLEMENTATION PHASE
        1. Field Studies (Involving Several Users) Including a Variation of Technology Probes
        2. User Experience Studies in the Field (Investigating Social User Experience)
      7. SUMMARY AND OUTLOOK
    6. REFERENCES
      1. KEY TERMS
    7. IX. Inducing User Cooperation in Peer-to-Peer Television: Deriving Mechanisms from Psychological Theories
      1. ABSTRACT
      2. INTRODUCTION
      3. TRIBLER AND USER COOPERATION
        1. User Cooperation in P2P-TV Systems
      4. RELEVANT PSYCHOLOGICAL BACKGROUNDS
        1. Costly Signaling Theory
        2. Social Impact Theory
        3. Kin Selection Theory
          1. Equation 1
            1. C/B < R
          2. Equation 2
            1. C/B < 12 -DoS
        4. Social Exchange Theory
        5. Social Learning Theory
        6. Social Balance Theory
        7. Group Selection Theory
        8. Social Identity Theory
        9. Theory of Reciprocal Altruism
        10. Equity Theory
        11. Theory of Group Cohesiveness
        12. Cognitive Evaluation Theory
        13. Self-Affirmation Theory
      5. OVERVIEW OF PSYCHOLOGICAL BACKGROUNDS AND SUGGESTED MECHANISMS
        1. Cooperation Inducing Mechanisms and Tribler
      6. CONCLUSION AND FUTURE WORK
    8. REFERENCES
  10. III. Making it Work: Social Television Systems
    1. X. Getting to Know Social Television: One Team's Discoveries from Library to Living Room
      1. ABSTRACT
      2. INTRODUCTION
      3. STV: A SOCIAL TELEVISION SYSTEM
        1. Presence
          1. Buddy List
          2. Ambient Display
        2. Program Suggestions
        3. Communication
          1. Closed-Form Communication
          2. Text Chat
          3. Voice Chat
        4. Historical Information
      4. OUR RESEARCH
        1. Focus Group Concept Study
        2. STV1 Prototype Field Trials
        3. STV2 prototype Field Trials
        4. STV3 Prototype Field Trials
        5. Analysis
      5. WHAT DO WE KNOW ABOUT SOCIAL TELEVISION?
        1. Effectiveness and Appeal
          1. Quantitative Measures: Ambivalence
          2. First Impressions: Wariness
          3. Experiences: Interest and Appetite
          4. Effects on Privacy
          5. Effectiveness and Appeal: Discussion
        2. Communication Modality Alternatives
          1. Text vs. Voice
          2. Text and Voice in Practice
          3. Video Communication
          4. Communication Modality Alternatives: Discussion
        3. The Uses of Social Television
          1. Like Being There (In the Lab)
          2. Just Talk
          3. Usage Patterns
          4. Anti-Social Television
          5. The Uses of Social Television: Discussion
      6. WHAT DON'T WE KNOW ABOUT SOCIAL TELEVISION?
        1. How Do We Support Multiple Users within the Home?
        2. What Equipment Do We Need?
        3. Where Should Social Television Be Going?
      7. CONCLUSION
      8. ACKNOWLEDGMENT
    2. REFERENCES
      1. ENDNOTES
    3. XI. ConnecTV: Share the Experience
      1. ABSTRACT
      2. THE CONNECTV SERVICE
        1. The Buddy List
        2. Change to the Channel that a Buddy is Watching
        3. TV Program Recommendation
        4. Follow a Friend
        5. Invite a Friend
        6. Buddy Status Messages
        7. Most popular Channel
      3. IMPLEMENTATION
      4. SETTING UP THE FIELD TRIAL
      5. RESEARCH METHODOLOGY
        1. Online Surveys
        2. Logging
        3. Experience Samples
        4. Measurement of Usage of ConnecTV
        5. Measurement of TV-Viewing Behavior
        6. Measurement of TV-Viewing Experience
        7. Measurement of People's Opinion about ConnecTV
      6. RESULTS OF THE FIELD TRIAL
        1. Usage of ConnecTV
        2. Effect on Viewing Behavior
        3. Effect on Viewing Experience
        4. People's Opinion about ConnecTV
      7. BUSINESS ASPECTS OF SOCIAL TV SERVICES
        1. Service Aspects
        2. Technical Aspects
        3. Organizational Aspects
        4. Financial Aspects
      8. CONCLUSION AND FUTURE WORK
        1. Conclusion
        2. Further Work
    4. REFERENCES
    5. XII. Asynchronous Communication: Fostering Social Interaction with CollaboraTV
      1. ABSTRACT
      2. INTRODUCTION
        1. Declined Social Interactions Around Television
        2. The "Water-Cooler Effect": A Thing of the Past?
        3. Unprecedented Level of Program Choice
      3. RELATED WORK
        1. Social Television Systems
        2. Avatars
      4. SYSTEM DESCRIPTION
        1. Temporally-Linked Annotations
        2. Virtual Audience
        3. Buddies, Sharing and Privacy
        4. Interest Profiles
        5. Interface Design
        6. System Architecture
      5. EXPERIMENT: LAB STUDY
        1. Experimental Setup
        2. Participants
        3. Procedure
      6. RESULTS: LAB STUDY
        1. Asynchronous Communication and the Virtual Audience
        2. System Redesign
      7. EXPERIMENT: FIELD TRIAL
        1. Participants
        2. Procedure
        3. Experimental Design
      8. RESULTS: FIELD TRIAL
        1. Annotation Activity
        2. Chat Content
        3. Attitude Towards Text chat and Other Social Interaction Features
        4. Overall Activity Level
        5. Sharing and Privacy
      9. DISCUSSION AND FUTURE WORK
        1. Alternate Temporal Annotations
        2. Integration with Social Networking Sites
        3. Show Highlights
        4. Show Recommenders
        5. Limitations and Learnings
      10. CONCLUSION
    6. REFERENCES
    7. XIII. From 2BeOn Results to New Media Challenges for Social (i)TV
      1. ABSTRACT
      2. SOCIAL (I)TV - PROGRESSES AND CHALLENGES
      3. THE 2BEON SYSTEM
        1. Conceptualization Process
        2. Design Guide Principles
        3. Main Features
        4. The Development Process
        5. The Evaluation Process
        6. Evaluation Results
          1. 1st Goal: Usability of the Prototype
          2. 2nd Goal: (a) Validation of the System's Conceptual Model
          3. 2nd Goal: (b) Achievement of the Main Objective
      4. NEW BEHAVIOURS AND PLATFORMS FOR SOCIAL (I)TV
        1. Where Users are Watching TV Content?
        2. What about Social AV/TV features?
        3. Challenges
        4. Tools for Supporting Synchronous Social AV/TV Activities
      5. THE USER MEDIA CONSUMPTION AWARENESS SYSTEM (UMCA)
        1. Technical and Functional Model
        2. System Configuration Proposal
      6. CONCLUSION AND FUTURE WORK
    8. REFERENCES
      1. ENDNOTES
  11. IV. Thinking Out-of-the-Box: Social TV on Large Screens, Mobile Devices and the Web
    1. XIV. Examining the Roles of Mobility in Social TV
      1. ABSTRACT
      2. INTRODUCTION
      3. SOCIAL AND TECHNOLOGICAL ASPECTS OF MOBILE TV
        1. Social Value of TV
        2. Cross Media Infrastructure
        3. Related Research in the HCI and CSCW Fields
        4. User Generated and Distributed content
        5. Content Enriched Interpersonal Communication
      4. MULTIPLE ROLES OF MOBILITY
        1. Mobile TV as a Content Format
        2. Mobile TV as User Behavior
        3. Mobile TV as Interaction Terminal
      5. CONCLUSION
    2. REFERENCES
    3. XV. Watching in Public: Understanding Audience Interaction with Big Screen TV in Urban Spaces
      1. ABSTRACT
      2. INTRODUCTION
      3. STUDY
      4. FINDINGS
        1. Standard TV Content Viewing
          1. Walk By
          2. Viewing while Resting and Waiting
          3. Viewing by Appointment: Structuring Activity Around Schedule
        2. Event-Based content and Behaviour
        3. Interactive Content Behaviours
        4. Big Screen and Situated Content
        5. Architectural and Spatial Characteristics and Influence on Behaviour
        6. Health and Safety Issues with the Big Screens
      5. CONCLUSION
    4. REFERENCES
    5. XVI. Zync with Me: Synchronized Sharing of Video through Instant Messaging
      1. ABSTRACT
      2. INTRODUCTION
      3. BACKGROUND
      4. DESIGN
        1. Near Sync
        2. Finding Metrics
      5. BEHAVIORS AND MOTIVATIONS
        1. Interaction Behaviors
        2. Scrub Now, Chat Later
        3. Conversation and Control
          1. The Influence of Time
        4. Social Structures of IM Video Sharing
        5. Motivations
          1. Watching with Close Friends
          2. Ambient Virtual Co-Presence
      6. FUTURE WORK
    6. REFERENCES
    7. XVII. Online Video as a Social Activity
      1. ABSTRACT
      2. DESIGNING SOCIAL ONLINE VIDEO EXPERIENCES
        1. Why Make Online Video Social?
      3. DESIGN CONSIDERATIONS
        1. Content
        2. Delivery
        3. Viewing Device
        4. model for Interaction
      4. EMPIRICAL STUDIES OF DISTRACTION AND SOCIABILITY
        1. Distraction Study
        2. Discussion of the Distraction Study
        3. Sociability Study
        4. Results from the Sociability Study
          1. Chat Amount
          2. Chat Topics
          3. Enjoyment
          4. Sociability
          5. Distraction
        5. Discussion of the Sociability Study
      5. DESIGN DECISIONS FOR ONLINE VIDEO
        1. Adapting chat to Different video Content
        2. Multimedia chat
        3. Mobile Video
        4. Supporting Large Audiences
      6. CONCLUSION
      7. ACKNOWLEDGMENT
    8. REFERENCES
  12. Afterword Television is Dead. Long Live Television!
    1. ENDNOTES
  13. Compilation of References
  14. About the Contributors