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Social Collaboration For Dummies by David F. Carr

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Chapter 7

Collaborating on Content

In This Chapter

arrow Sharing documents and files

arrow Writing and editing documents together

arrow Keeping content under control

Much as social networks are associated with broadcasting status messages and blog posts, another sort of content is more important to true collaboration: namely, the content that people create together. Members of a collaboration network work in teams to create all sorts of group documents. Sometimes the document itself is the work product: for example, the draft of a new vacation leave policy that members of the human resources team may edit, update, and add to over a period of weeks or months before publishing it to the wider organization. Just as often, if not more so, collaborators work on planning documents or budgets that are part of some larger project or initiative.

Content collaboration takes many forms, but one convenient breakdown is to look at sharing files — typically, business documents, such as Microsoft Word, Excel, or PowerPoint files — as opposed to working with web-based documents.

The content collaboration features of social platforms range from simple to sophisticated — something I discuss in the context of product ...

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