You are previewing Smashing Node.js: JavaScript Everywhere, 2nd Edition.

Smashing Node.js: JavaScript Everywhere, 2nd Edition

Cover of Smashing Node.js: JavaScript Everywhere, 2nd Edition by Guillermo Rauch Published by John Wiley & Sons
  1. Cover
  2. Table of Contents
  3. Title Page
  4. Foreword
  5. Part I: Getting Started: Setup and Concepts
    1. Chapter 1: The Setup
      1. Installing on Windows
      2. Installing on OS X
      3. Installing on Linux
      4. The Node REPL
      5. Executing a file
      6. NPM
      7. Summary
    2. Chapter 2: Javascript: An Overview
      1. Introduction
      2. Basic JavaScript
      3. v8 JavaScript
      4. Summary
    3. Chapter 3: Blocking and Non-blocking IO
      1. With great power comes great responsibility
      2. Summary
    4. Chapter 4: Node JavaScript
      1. The global object
      2. The module system
      3. Exposing APIs
      4. Events
      5. Buffers
      6. Summary
  6. Part II: Essential Node APIs
    1. Chapter 5: CLI and FS APIs: Your First Application
      1. Requirements
      2. Writing your first program
      3. Exploring the CLI
      4. Exploring the fs module
      5. Summary
    2. Chapter 6: TCP
      1. What are the characteristics of TCP?
      2. Telnet
      3. A TCP chat program
      4. An IRC Client program
      5. Summary
    3. Chapter 7: HTTP
      1. The structure of HTTP
      2. Headers
      3. Connections
      4. A simple web server
      5. A twitter web client
      6. A superagent to the rescue
      7. Reloading HTTP servers with up
      8. Summary
  7. Part III: Web Development
    1. Chapter 8: Connect
      1. A simple website with HTTP
      2. A simple website with Connect
      3. Middleware
      4. Summary
    2. Chapter 9: Express
      1. A simple express app
      2. Settings
      3. Template engines
      4. Error handling
      5. Convenience methods
      6. Routes
      7. Middleware
      8. Organization strategies
      9. Summary
    3. Chapter 10: WebSocket
      1. AJAX
      2. HTML5 WebSocket
      3. An Echo Example
      4. Mouse cursors
      5. The Challenges Ahead
      6. Summary
    4. Chapter 11: Socket.IO
      1. Transports
      2. A chat program
      3. A DJ-by-turns application
      4. Summary
  8. Part IV: Databases
    1. Chapter 12: MongoDB
      1. Installation
      2. Accessing MongoDB: A user authentication example
      3. Introducing Mongoose
      4. A mongoose example
      5. Summary
    2. Chapter 13: MySQL
      1. node-mysql
      2. sequelize
      3. Summary
    3. Chapter 14: Redis
      1. Installing Redis
      2. The Redis Query Language
      3. Data types
      4. Redis and Node
      5. Summary
  9. Part V: Testing
    1. Chapter 15: Code Sharing
      1. What can be shared?
      2. Writing compatible JavaScript
      3. Putting it all together: browserbuild
      4. Summary
    2. Chapter 16: Testing
      1. Simple testing
      2. Expect.JS
      3. Mocha
      4. Summary

Chapter 10: WebSocket

So far, most website and web application developers are accustomed to communicating exclusively with a server by making HTTP requests that are followed by HTTP responses.

The model of requesting a resource by specifying its URL, Content-Type, and other attributes that you saw in previous chapters works well if you keep in mind the use case that the World Wide Web was crafted to solve. The web was created to deliver documents that were heavily interlinked to each other. URLs have paths because documents typically have hierarchies in file systems. And each level of hierarchy can contain indexes with hyperlinks.

Consider the following, for example:

GET /animals/index.html

GET /animals/mammals/index.html

GET /animals/mammals/ferrets.html

With time, however, the web became more and more interactive. The traditional web that was about retrieving entire documents every time the user clicked is less common nowadays, especially with all the tools that HTML5 makes available. You can now create very sophisticated web applications that often have completely deprecated desktop application counterparts, games, text editors, and more.


The Web 2.0 marked the uprise of the web application. One of its key ingredients was AJAX, which translated into a snappier user experience for a fundamental reason: you no longer had to retrieve an entire HTML document every time the user interacted with the server.

For example, if you are updating your profile on a social networking ...

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