You are previewing Smashing Node.js: JavaScript Everywhere, 2nd Edition.

Smashing Node.js: JavaScript Everywhere, 2nd Edition

Cover of Smashing Node.js: JavaScript Everywhere, 2nd Edition by Guillermo Rauch Published by John Wiley & Sons
  1. Cover
  2. Table of Contents
  3. Title Page
  4. Foreword
  5. Part I: Getting Started: Setup and Concepts
    1. Chapter 1: The Setup
      1. Installing on Windows
      2. Installing on OS X
      3. Installing on Linux
      4. The Node REPL
      5. Executing a file
      6. NPM
      7. Summary
    2. Chapter 2: Javascript: An Overview
      1. Introduction
      2. Basic JavaScript
      3. v8 JavaScript
      4. Summary
    3. Chapter 3: Blocking and Non-blocking IO
      1. With great power comes great responsibility
      2. Summary
    4. Chapter 4: Node JavaScript
      1. The global object
      2. The module system
      3. Exposing APIs
      4. Events
      5. Buffers
      6. Summary
  6. Part II: Essential Node APIs
    1. Chapter 5: CLI and FS APIs: Your First Application
      1. Requirements
      2. Writing your first program
      3. Exploring the CLI
      4. Exploring the fs module
      5. Summary
    2. Chapter 6: TCP
      1. What are the characteristics of TCP?
      2. Telnet
      3. A TCP chat program
      4. An IRC Client program
      5. Summary
    3. Chapter 7: HTTP
      1. The structure of HTTP
      2. Headers
      3. Connections
      4. A simple web server
      5. A twitter web client
      6. A superagent to the rescue
      7. Reloading HTTP servers with up
      8. Summary
  7. Part III: Web Development
    1. Chapter 8: Connect
      1. A simple website with HTTP
      2. A simple website with Connect
      3. Middleware
      4. Summary
    2. Chapter 9: Express
      1. A simple express app
      2. Settings
      3. Template engines
      4. Error handling
      5. Convenience methods
      6. Routes
      7. Middleware
      8. Organization strategies
      9. Summary
    3. Chapter 10: WebSocket
      1. AJAX
      2. HTML5 WebSocket
      3. An Echo Example
      4. Mouse cursors
      5. The Challenges Ahead
      6. Summary
    4. Chapter 11: Socket.IO
      1. Transports
      2. A chat program
      3. A DJ-by-turns application
      4. Summary
  8. Part IV: Databases
    1. Chapter 12: MongoDB
      1. Installation
      2. Accessing MongoDB: A user authentication example
      3. Introducing Mongoose
      4. A mongoose example
      5. Summary
    2. Chapter 13: MySQL
      1. node-mysql
      2. sequelize
      3. Summary
    3. Chapter 14: Redis
      1. Installing Redis
      2. The Redis Query Language
      3. Data types
      4. Redis and Node
      5. Summary
  9. Part V: Testing
    1. Chapter 15: Code Sharing
      1. What can be shared?
      2. Writing compatible JavaScript
      3. Putting it all together: browserbuild
      4. Summary
    2. Chapter 16: Testing
      1. Simple testing
      2. Expect.JS
      3. Mocha
      4. Summary

Chapter 9: Express

Whereas Connect provides the foundation for the common set of basic tasks that are normally performed on top of the HTTP module, Express provides convenient APIs on top of Connect to build entire websites and web applications.

Throughout the examples in Chapter 8, you might have noticed most of the tasks performed in the interaction between a web browser and web server are organized around methods and URLs. The combination of these two is what is sometimes referred to as routes, a concept that sets the foundation for an Express app.

Express builds on top of Connect and therefore on the idea that you can reuse middleware that performs certain basic tasks. This means you get an expressive API for your web applications, without sacrificing a rich ecosystem of reusable components that sit on top of the HTTP stack.

To see the expressiveness hands-on, write a small application powered entirely by Express to search the Twitter API.

A simple express app

This app, albeit simple, is by definition dynamic. When the user requests “tweets” for their search term, you need to produce HTML that contains them. Instead of concatenating strings that make up that HTML manually in our request handlers, you’ll be leveraging a simple template language that will split the logic of the controller from the view.

The first step will be to ensure we include the module requirements that satisfy these needs.

Creating the module

Create package.json as usual, but this time add two extra dependencies: ...

The best content for your career. Discover unlimited learning on demand for around $1/day.