You are previewing Smashing Node.js: JavaScript Everywhere, 2nd Edition.

Smashing Node.js: JavaScript Everywhere, 2nd Edition

Cover of Smashing Node.js: JavaScript Everywhere, 2nd Edition by Guillermo Rauch Published by John Wiley & Sons
  1. Cover
  2. Table of Contents
  3. Title Page
  4. Foreword
  5. Part I: Getting Started: Setup and Concepts
    1. Chapter 1: The Setup
      1. Installing on Windows
      2. Installing on OS X
      3. Installing on Linux
      4. The Node REPL
      5. Executing a file
      6. NPM
      7. Summary
    2. Chapter 2: Javascript: An Overview
      1. Introduction
      2. Basic JavaScript
      3. v8 JavaScript
      4. Summary
    3. Chapter 3: Blocking and Non-blocking IO
      1. With great power comes great responsibility
      2. Summary
    4. Chapter 4: Node JavaScript
      1. The global object
      2. The module system
      3. Exposing APIs
      4. Events
      5. Buffers
      6. Summary
  6. Part II: Essential Node APIs
    1. Chapter 5: CLI and FS APIs: Your First Application
      1. Requirements
      2. Writing your first program
      3. Exploring the CLI
      4. Exploring the fs module
      5. Summary
    2. Chapter 6: TCP
      1. What are the characteristics of TCP?
      2. Telnet
      3. A TCP chat program
      4. An IRC Client program
      5. Summary
    3. Chapter 7: HTTP
      1. The structure of HTTP
      2. Headers
      3. Connections
      4. A simple web server
      5. A twitter web client
      6. A superagent to the rescue
      7. Reloading HTTP servers with up
      8. Summary
  7. Part III: Web Development
    1. Chapter 8: Connect
      1. A simple website with HTTP
      2. A simple website with Connect
      3. Middleware
      4. Summary
    2. Chapter 9: Express
      1. A simple express app
      2. Settings
      3. Template engines
      4. Error handling
      5. Convenience methods
      6. Routes
      7. Middleware
      8. Organization strategies
      9. Summary
    3. Chapter 10: WebSocket
      1. AJAX
      2. HTML5 WebSocket
      3. An Echo Example
      4. Mouse cursors
      5. The Challenges Ahead
      6. Summary
    4. Chapter 11: Socket.IO
      1. Transports
      2. A chat program
      3. A DJ-by-turns application
      4. Summary
  8. Part IV: Databases
    1. Chapter 12: MongoDB
      1. Installation
      2. Accessing MongoDB: A user authentication example
      3. Introducing Mongoose
      4. A mongoose example
      5. Summary
    2. Chapter 13: MySQL
      1. node-mysql
      2. sequelize
      3. Summary
    3. Chapter 14: Redis
      1. Installing Redis
      2. The Redis Query Language
      3. Data types
      4. Redis and Node
      5. Summary
  9. Part V: Testing
    1. Chapter 15: Code Sharing
      1. What can be shared?
      2. Writing compatible JavaScript
      3. Putting it all together: browserbuild
      4. Summary
    2. Chapter 16: Testing
      1. Simple testing
      2. Expect.JS
      3. Mocha
      4. Summary

Chapter 7: HTTP

Hypertext Transfer protocol, or HTTP, is the protocol that powers the web, and, as discussed in Chapter 6, it sits on top of the TCP stack,

Throughout this chapter you’ll learn how to leverage the Node.JS Server and Client APIs. Both are really easy to use to get started, but you’ll also learn some of the shortcomings that come up when building actual websites and web applications with them. For that, in the coming chapters I will introduce you to abstractions that sit on the HTTP server to introduce reusable components.

Keep in mind that since you’re programming both the server and the website as part of the same code, every time you make changes with your text editor to code that’s running, you need to restart the Node process that powers it to have the changes reflect. At the end of this chapter I’ll teach you how to leverage a tool to make this process straightforward.

To get started, let’s review the anatomy of the HTTP protocol.

The structure of HTTP

The protocol is structured around the concept of requests and responses, materialized in Node.JS as objects of the http.ServerRequest and http.ServerResponse constructors, respectively.

When a user first browses to a website, the user agent (the browser) creates a request that gets sent to the web server over TCP, and a response is emitted.

What do requests and responses look like? To find out, first create a Hello World Node HTTP server that listens on http://localhost:3000:

require(‘http’).createServer(function ...

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