You are previewing Smashing Node.js: JavaScript Everywhere, 2nd Edition.

Smashing Node.js: JavaScript Everywhere, 2nd Edition

Cover of Smashing Node.js: JavaScript Everywhere, 2nd Edition by Guillermo Rauch Published by John Wiley & Sons
  1. Cover
  2. Table of Contents
  3. Title Page
  4. Foreword
  5. Part I: Getting Started: Setup and Concepts
    1. Chapter 1: The Setup
      1. Installing on Windows
      2. Installing on OS X
      3. Installing on Linux
      4. The Node REPL
      5. Executing a file
      6. NPM
      7. Summary
    2. Chapter 2: Javascript: An Overview
      1. Introduction
      2. Basic JavaScript
      3. v8 JavaScript
      4. Summary
    3. Chapter 3: Blocking and Non-blocking IO
      1. With great power comes great responsibility
      2. Summary
    4. Chapter 4: Node JavaScript
      1. The global object
      2. The module system
      3. Exposing APIs
      4. Events
      5. Buffers
      6. Summary
  6. Part II: Essential Node APIs
    1. Chapter 5: CLI and FS APIs: Your First Application
      1. Requirements
      2. Writing your first program
      3. Exploring the CLI
      4. Exploring the fs module
      5. Summary
    2. Chapter 6: TCP
      1. What are the characteristics of TCP?
      2. Telnet
      3. A TCP chat program
      4. An IRC Client program
      5. Summary
    3. Chapter 7: HTTP
      1. The structure of HTTP
      2. Headers
      3. Connections
      4. A simple web server
      5. A twitter web client
      6. A superagent to the rescue
      7. Reloading HTTP servers with up
      8. Summary
  7. Part III: Web Development
    1. Chapter 8: Connect
      1. A simple website with HTTP
      2. A simple website with Connect
      3. Middleware
      4. Summary
    2. Chapter 9: Express
      1. A simple express app
      2. Settings
      3. Template engines
      4. Error handling
      5. Convenience methods
      6. Routes
      7. Middleware
      8. Organization strategies
      9. Summary
    3. Chapter 10: WebSocket
      1. AJAX
      2. HTML5 WebSocket
      3. An Echo Example
      4. Mouse cursors
      5. The Challenges Ahead
      6. Summary
    4. Chapter 11: Socket.IO
      1. Transports
      2. A chat program
      3. A DJ-by-turns application
      4. Summary
  8. Part IV: Databases
    1. Chapter 12: MongoDB
      1. Installation
      2. Accessing MongoDB: A user authentication example
      3. Introducing Mongoose
      4. A mongoose example
      5. Summary
    2. Chapter 13: MySQL
      1. node-mysql
      2. sequelize
      3. Summary
    3. Chapter 14: Redis
      1. Installing Redis
      2. The Redis Query Language
      3. Data types
      4. Redis and Node
      5. Summary
  9. Part V: Testing
    1. Chapter 15: Code Sharing
      1. What can be shared?
      2. Writing compatible JavaScript
      3. Putting it all together: browserbuild
      4. Summary
    2. Chapter 16: Testing
      1. Simple testing
      2. Expect.JS
      3. Mocha
      4. Summary

Chapter 2: Javascript: An Overview


JavaScript is a prototype-based, object-oriented, loosely-typed dynamic scripting language. It has powerful features from the functional world, such as closures and higher-order functions, that are of special interest here.

JavaScript is technically an implementation of the ECMAScript language standard. It’s important to know that with Node, because of v8, you’ll be primarily dealing with an implementation that gets close to the standard, with the exception of a few extra features. This means that the JavaScript you’re going to be dealing with has some important differences with the one that earned the language its bad reputation in the browser world.

In addition, most of the code you’ll write is in compliance with the “good parts” of JavaScript that Douglas Crockford enounced in his famous book, JavaScript: The Good Parts.

This chapter is divided into two parts:

Basic JavaScript. The fundamentals of the language. They apply everywhere: node, browser, and standards committee.

v8 JavaScript. Some features used in v8 are not available in all browsers, especially Internet Explorer, because they’ve recently been standardized. Others are nonstandard, but you still use them because they solve fundamental problems.

In addition, the next chapter covers the language extensions and features exclusively available in Node.

Basic JavaScript

This chapter assumes that you’re somewhat familiar with JavaScript and its syntax. It goes over some ...

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