You are previewing Smashing Node.js: JavaScript Everywhere, 2nd Edition.

Smashing Node.js: JavaScript Everywhere, 2nd Edition

Cover of Smashing Node.js: JavaScript Everywhere, 2nd Edition by Guillermo Rauch Published by John Wiley & Sons
  1. Cover
  2. Table of Contents
  3. Title Page
  4. Foreword
  5. Part I: Getting Started: Setup and Concepts
    1. Chapter 1: The Setup
      1. Installing on Windows
      2. Installing on OS X
      3. Installing on Linux
      4. The Node REPL
      5. Executing a file
      6. NPM
      7. Summary
    2. Chapter 2: Javascript: An Overview
      1. Introduction
      2. Basic JavaScript
      3. v8 JavaScript
      4. Summary
    3. Chapter 3: Blocking and Non-blocking IO
      1. With great power comes great responsibility
      2. Summary
    4. Chapter 4: Node JavaScript
      1. The global object
      2. The module system
      3. Exposing APIs
      4. Events
      5. Buffers
      6. Summary
  6. Part II: Essential Node APIs
    1. Chapter 5: CLI and FS APIs: Your First Application
      1. Requirements
      2. Writing your first program
      3. Exploring the CLI
      4. Exploring the fs module
      5. Summary
    2. Chapter 6: TCP
      1. What are the characteristics of TCP?
      2. Telnet
      3. A TCP chat program
      4. An IRC Client program
      5. Summary
    3. Chapter 7: HTTP
      1. The structure of HTTP
      2. Headers
      3. Connections
      4. A simple web server
      5. A twitter web client
      6. A superagent to the rescue
      7. Reloading HTTP servers with up
      8. Summary
  7. Part III: Web Development
    1. Chapter 8: Connect
      1. A simple website with HTTP
      2. A simple website with Connect
      3. Middleware
      4. Summary
    2. Chapter 9: Express
      1. A simple express app
      2. Settings
      3. Template engines
      4. Error handling
      5. Convenience methods
      6. Routes
      7. Middleware
      8. Organization strategies
      9. Summary
    3. Chapter 10: WebSocket
      1. AJAX
      2. HTML5 WebSocket
      3. An Echo Example
      4. Mouse cursors
      5. The Challenges Ahead
      6. Summary
    4. Chapter 11: Socket.IO
      1. Transports
      2. A chat program
      3. A DJ-by-turns application
      4. Summary
  8. Part IV: Databases
    1. Chapter 12: MongoDB
      1. Installation
      2. Accessing MongoDB: A user authentication example
      3. Introducing Mongoose
      4. A mongoose example
      5. Summary
    2. Chapter 13: MySQL
      1. node-mysql
      2. sequelize
      3. Summary
    3. Chapter 14: Redis
      1. Installing Redis
      2. The Redis Query Language
      3. Data types
      4. Redis and Node
      5. Summary
  9. Part V: Testing
    1. Chapter 15: Code Sharing
      1. What can be shared?
      2. Writing compatible JavaScript
      3. Putting it all together: browserbuild
      4. Summary
    2. Chapter 16: Testing
      1. Simple testing
      2. Expect.JS
      3. Mocha
      4. Summary
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Introduction

Late in 2009, Ryan Dahl announced a technology named Node.JS (http://nodejs.org/) at a JavaScript conference in Berlin. Interestingly, and to the surprise of the attendees, this technology wasn’t designed to run in the browser, the land that JavaScript had conquered and that many developers thought it would always be confined to.

This technology was about running JavaScript in the server. That simple phrase immediately sparked the imagination of the audience, which celebrated the announcement in standing ovation.

If done right, we could write web applications in just one language.

That was, undoubtedly, the first thought in everyone’s minds. After all, to produce a rich and modern web application, one must be proficient with JavaScript, but server technologies are varied and require specialization. As an example, Facebook recently revealed that its codebase has four times the number of lines of JS than PHP, its back-end language of choice.

But what Ryan was interested in showing went beyond that simple yet powerful premise. Ryan showed that the “hello world” program of Node.JS creates a web server:

var http = require(‘http’);

var server = http.createServer(function (req, res) {

  res.writeHead(200);

  res.end(’Hello world’);

});

server.listen(80);

It so happens this webserver is not just a toy, but a high-performance web server that happens to fare just as well (or even better) than established and tested software like Apache and Nginx in a multitude of scenarios. ...

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