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SharePoint 2010 at Work by Mark Miller

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Chapter 10. SharePoint 2010 Tab Page

Peter Allen

When the amount of content to be shown on a page exceeds the viewable real estate, users have to scroll down the page to view the content they wish to see. Scrolling is something to be avoided for an optimum user experience. Less scrolling means a much better experience for the user. SharePoint, however, does not provide a way to make this happen.

One of the better solutions to this problem in SharePoint is the use of tabs. Tabs allow the content manager to place more information on a single page while not forcing the user to scroll up and down the page to get to that information.

Wouldn’t it be great to have a solution that allowed you to have a page that had tabs incorporated and ready for you to use?

The goal, then, is to create a Tab page that will do the following:

  • Allow users to view content with little to no scrolling.

  • Provide an option that has two to eight tabs.

  • Enable the use of cookies so that tabs become sticky, so when returning to the tab page, users will land on the last tab they were on.

  • Allow for multiple web parts to be viewed in one tab.

What, then, will the end product look like? Well, it will look something like the pages shown in Figure 10-1 and Figure 10-2.

SharePoint 2010 Tabs page

Figure 10-1. SharePoint 2010 Tabs page

SharePoint 2010 Tab page example showing web part placement

Figure 10-2. SharePoint 2010 ...

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