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See What I Mean

Book Description

If you're an executive, designer, product manager, marketer, or engineer, communication is part of your work. Using images and text in unique ways, comics can engage readers in ways traditional methods can't. In See What I Mean, you'll learn how to create comics about your products and processes without an illustrator—just like Google, eBay, and Adobe do.

Table of Contents

  1. Cover Page
  2. Title Page
  3. Copyright Page
  4. DEDICATION
  5. HOW TO USE THIS BOOK
    1. Who Should Read This Book?
    2. What’s in This Book?
    3. What Comes with This Book?
  6. FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS
    1. What tools do I need?
    2. What if I can’t draw?
    3. When should I use comics?
    4. How do I convince my client or team to use comics?
  7. CONTENTS
  8. FOREWORD
  9. INTRODUCTION
  10. CHAPTER 1 Comics?!
  11. CHAPTER 2 Properties of Comics
    1. Comics Around the World
    2. Comics for Young and Old
    3. Comic Formats
    4. Anatomy of a Comic
    5. The Four Properties of Comics
      1. Communication
      2. Imagination
      3. Expression
      4. Time
    6. Summary
  12. CHAPTER 3 You Don’t Need to Be an Artist
    1. Getting a Lot for a Little
    2. People Are People
      1. Proportions
      2. Body Language
      3. Drawing More Complex Figures
    3. Faces
      1. Expressions
      2. Proportions
    4. Settings and Objects
    5. Summary
  13. CHAPTER 4 What’s Your Comic About?
    1. The Comic Creation Process
    2. The Example: Square
    3. Goals of Your Comic
    4. The Length of Your Comic
    5. The Audience for Your Comic
    6. Selecting a Representative Use Case
    7. Summary
  14. CHAPTER 5 Writing the Story
    1. A Crash Course in Scriptwriting
    2. Setting
    3. Characters
    4. Dialogue
      1. Choosing Your Words Carefully
      2. Captions
    5. How You Tell the Story
      1. Remove Unnecessary Details
      2. Be Direct
      3. Combine Points
      4. Show Don’t Tell
    6. Writing the Square Script
    7. Summary
  15. CHAPTER 6 Laying Out the Comic
    1. Composition
      1. The Rule of Thirds
      2. Leave Enough Room
      3. Intersecting Lines
    2. Perspective
      1. Distance
      2. Angle
      3. Selecting a Variety
    3. Flow and Progression
    4. Laying Out the Square Script
    5. Summary
  16. CHAPTER 7 Drawing and Refining
    1. Reference Materials
      1. Photographs
      2. Avatar Generators
      3. Scene Generators
    2. Templates
    3. Comic Creation Software
    4. Online Creation Tools
    5. Summary
  17. CHAPTER 8 Applying Comics
    1. Communicating Vision
      1. Getting on the Same Page
    2. A Great Starting Point
    3. Validating Ideas
    4. Read It Twice
    5. Solicit Feedback
    6. Feedback on Comic vs. Concept
    7. Market Your Product
    8. An Alternative Medium
    9. Summary
  18. CHAPTER 9 Breaking Down the Barriers
    1. Understand Your Audience
    2. Sell the Time Savings
    3. It’s All About Framing
    4. It Gets Attention
    5. Everybody’s Doing It
    6. Summary
  19. CHAPTER 10 Wrapping Up
  20. APPENDIX Useful Templates and References
    1. Interesting Comic Panels
    2. Gesture Dictionary
    3. Facial Expression Dictionary
  21. Index
  22. ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
  23. ABOUT THE AUTHOR
  24. Footnote
    1. Chapter 7