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Security in Virtual Worlds, 3D Webs, and Immersive Environments

Book Description

Security in Virtual Worlds, 3D Webs, and Immersive Environments: Models for Development, Interaction, and Management brings together the issues that managers, practitioners, and researchers must consider when planning, implementing, working within, and managing these promising virtual technologies for secure processes and initiatives. This publication discusses the uses and potential of these virtual technologies and examines secure policy formation and practices that can be applied specifically to each. Although one finds much discussion and research on the features and functionality of Rich Internet Applications (RIAs), the 3D Web, Immersive Environments (e.g. MMORPGs) and Virtual Worlds in both scholarly and popular publications, very little is written about the issues and techniques one must consider when creating, deploying, interacting within, and managing them securely.

Table of Contents

  1. Cover
  2. Title Page
  3. Copyright Page
  4. Editorial Advisory Board and List of Reviewers
    1. Editorial Advisory Board
    2. List of Reviewers
  5. Foreword
  6. Preface
    1. INTRODUCTION
    2. WHY THIS BOOK NOW?
    3. WHAT TO EXPECT IN THIS BOOK
    4. WHERE DO WE GO FROM HERE?
    5. ACKNOWLEDGMENT AND THANKS
  7. Chapter 1: Individual Privacy and Security in Virtual Worlds
    1. Abstract
    2. Introduction
    3. Solutions: Technology, Behavioral and Policy
    4. Building Robust Virtual Platforms that Protect Individual Rights
    5. Conclusion
  8. Chapter 2: 3D3C Identity
    1. Abstract
    2. Introduction
    3. 3D3C Identity Challenges in Virtual Worlds
    4. Towards a Systematic Approach to 3D3C Identity
    5. Conclusion
    6. Acknowledgment
  9. Chapter 3: Society in a Virtual World
    1. Abstract
    2. Introduction
    3. Virtual Population
    4. Attackers and Attacks in Virtual World
    5. The Virtual World and Web Attacks
    6. Future Research Direction
    7. Conclusion
  10. Chapter 4: Understanding Risk and Risk-Taking Behavior in Virtual Worlds
    1. Abstract
    2. Introduction
    3. Defining Risk
    4. Privacy Risks
    5. Relating Security and Privacy
    6. Role of Perception in Risk Taking Behavior in Virtual Worlds
    7. Attitudes toward Risk
    8. Quantifying the Cost of Security Incidents in the Virtual Worlds
    9. Approaches for Acceptable-Risk Decisions
    10. Motivations in Virtual Worlds
    11. Conclusion
    12. Future Directions
  11. Chapter 5: The Social Design of 3D Interactive Spaces for Security in Higher Education
    1. Abstract
    2. Introduction
    3. Some Caveats
    4. Review of the Literature
    5. Human Risks
    6. Data Risks
    7. Virtual Environment Risks
    8. Defining Risks
    9. Some Applied Principles
    10. Types of Interventions
    11. Policy-Setting and Enforcement (Rules)
    12. Human Facilitation and Leadership (Facilitation)
    13. Technologies (Techno)
    14. On Balance
    15. Post-Security-Breach Mitigation of Harms
    16. Online Survey Results
    17. Online Survey: Defining Types of Learning in Immersive Spaces
    18. Online Survey: Defining Security Issues
    19. Online Survey: Defining Risks
    20. Online Survey: Security Incidences
    21. Survey: Social Designs to Promote Safety
    22. Discussion
    23. Future Concerns
    24. Conclusion
    25. Appendix
  12. Chapter 6: “No Drama!”
    1. ABSTRACT
    2. INTRODUCTION
    3. BACKGROUND
    4. ELF CIRCLE
    5. FUTURE RESEARCH DIRECTIONS
    6. CONCLUSION
    7. Appendix A: Questionnaire
    8. APPENDIX B: ELF CIRCLE GUARDIAN TRAINING
  13. Chapter 7: Sociable Behaviors in Virtual Worlds
    1. Abstract
    2. INTRODUCTION
    3. The Madem Model
    4. Application Example
    5. Future Research Directions
    6. Conclusion
  14. Chapter 8: Establishing Social Order in 3D Virtual Worlds with Virtual Institutions
    1. Abstract
    2. Introduction
    3. Virtual Institutions
    4. Conclusion and Future Work
  15. Chapter 9: Property-Based Object Management and Security
    1. Abstract
    2. 1 Introduction
    3. 2 Objects and their Importance
    4. 3 Security Aspects
    5. 4 Concept for Object Security
    6. 5 Conclusion
    7. 6 Additional Reading
  16. Chapter 10: X3D
    1. Abstract
    2. Introduction
    3. Background
    4. Industry Standards and Proprietary Technology
    5. The ISO Standard X3D and its History
    6. Current Challenges and Solution Approaches
    7. Provider-Specific Solutions and Recommendations
    8. Client-Side Security
    9. Multi-User Server Security
    10. Future Development Directions
    11. Conclusion
  17. Chapter 11: Aspect-Oriented Programming and Aspect.NET as Security and Privacy Tool for Web and 3D Web Programming
    1. Abstract
    2. Aspect-Oriented Programming and its Use for Trustworthy Computing
    3. Related Work
    4. Specifics of .NET, 3D Engines for .NET, and the Purpose of our Research
    5. Aspect.NET Basics
    6. Principles and Examples of Using Aspect.NET for Web Security and Privacy
    7. CONCLUSION
    8. Future Research Directions
  18. Chapter 12: Modeling Secure 3D Web Applications
    1. Abstract
    2. Introduction
    3. Background
    4. THE FLEX-VR SCENE STRUCTURALIZATION
    5. ARCO: AN APPLICATION OF FLEX-VR
    6. Conclusion and Future Works
  19. Chapter 13: An Access Control Model for Dynamic VR Applications
    1. Abstract
    2. Introduction
    3. Background
    4. VR-PR Approach
    5. VR-PR Applied to a Beh-VR Scene
    6. Future Research Directions
    7. Conclusion
  20. Compilation of References
  21. About the Contributors