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REST in Practice

Cover of REST in Practice by Ian Robinson... Published by O'Reilly Media, Inc.
  1. REST in Practice
    1. SPECIAL OFFER: Upgrade this ebook with O’Reilly
    2. Foreword
    3. Preface
      1. Should I Read This Book?
      2. Should I Skip This Book?
      3. Resources
      4. What Did You Think About the Book?
      5. Errata
      6. Conventions Used in This Book
      7. Using Code Examples
      8. How to Contact Us
      9. Safari® Books Online
      10. Acknowledgments
    4. 1. The Web As a Platform for Building Distributed Systems
      1. Architecture of the Web
      2. Thinking in Resources
      3. From the Web Architecture to the REST Architectural Style
      4. The Web As an Application Platform
      5. Web Friendliness and the Richardson Maturity Model
      6. GET on Board
    5. 2. Introducing Restbucks: How to GET a Coffee, Web Style
      1. Restbucks: A Little Coffee Shop with Global Ambitions
      2. Toolbox
      3. Here Comes the Web
    6. 3. Basic Web Integration
      1. Lose Weight, Feel Great!
      2. A Simple Coffee Ordering System
      3. URI Templates
      4. URI Tunneling
      5. POX: Plain Old XML over HTTP
      6. We Are Just Getting Started
    7. 4. CRUD Web Services
      1. Modeling Orders As Resources
      2. Building CRUD Services
      3. Aligning Resource State
      4. Consuming CRUD Services
      5. Consuming Services Automatically with WADL
      6. CRUD Is Good, but It’s Not Great
    8. 5. Hypermedia Services
      1. The Hypermedia Tenet
      2. Hypermedia Formats
      3. Contracts
      4. Hypermedia Protocols
      5. Implementing a Hypermedia Service
      6. Building the Ordering Service in Java
      7. Building the Ordering Service in .NET
      8. Ready, Set, Action
    9. 6. Scaling Out
      1. GET Back to Basics
      2. Caching
      3. Making Content Cacheable
      4. Implementing Caching in .NET
      5. Consistency
      6. Extending Freshness
      7. Stay Fresh
    10. 7. The Atom Syndication Format
      1. The Format
      2. Common Uses for Atom
      3. Using Atom for Event-Driven Systems
      4. Building an Atom Service in Java
      5. Building an Atom Service in .NET
      6. Atom Everywhere?
      7. After the Event
    11. 8. Atom Publishing Protocol
      1. Atom Publishing Protocol
      2. Implementing Order Fulfillment Using AtomPub
      3. Implementing AtomPub in .NET
      4. A Versatile Protocol
    12. 9. Web Security
      1. HTTP Security Essentials
      2. Identity and the OpenID Protocol
      3. The OAuth Protocol
      4. Service Hacks and Defenses
      5. Final Thoughts
    13. 10. Semantics
      1. Syntax Versus Semantics
      2. Structure and Representation of Information
      3. The Semantic Web
      4. Microformats
      5. Linked Data and the Web
      6. Guidance
    14. 11. The Web and WS-*
      1. Are Web Services Evil?
      2. SOAP: The Whole Truth
      3. WSDL: Just Another Object IDL
      4. Two Wrongs Don’t Make a Right
      5. Secure, Reliable, Transacted
      6. A Requiem for Web Services?
    15. 12. Building the Case for the Web
      1. No More Silver Bullets
      2. Building and Running Web-Based Services
      3. No Architecture Without Measurement
      4. Selling the Web
      5. Go Forth and Build
    16. Index
    17. About the Authors
    18. Colophon
    19. SPECIAL OFFER: Upgrade this ebook with O’Reilly
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Caching

Caching is the ability to store copies of frequently accessed data in several places along the request-response path. When a consumer requests a resource representation, the request goes through a cache or a series of caches toward the service hosting the resource. If any of the caches along the request path has a fresh copy of the requested representation, it uses that copy to satisfy the request. If none of the caches can satisfy the request, the request travels all the way to the service (or origin server as it is formally known).

Origin servers control the caching behavior of the representations they issue. Using HTTP headers, an origin server indicates whether a response can be cached, and if so, by whom, and for how long. Caches along the response path can take a copy of a response, but only if the caching metadata allows them to do so. The caches can then use these copies to satisfy subsequent requests. Cached copies of a resource representation can be used to satisfy subsequent requests so long as they remain fresh. A cached representation remains fresh for a specific period of time, which is called its freshness lifetime. When the age of a cached object exceeds its freshness lifetime, the object is said to be stale. Caches will often add an Age response header to a cached response. The Age header indicates how many seconds have passed since the representation was generated at the origin server.

A stale representation must be revalidated with the origin server before ...

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