Cover by Savas Parastatidis, Jim Webber, Ian Robinson

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Hypermedia Formats

Hypermedia-driven distributed systems put similar demands on their consumers as the Web does on humans: consumers need to discover and interact with resources so that they can realize an application’s goal. To illustrate how representation formats allow consumers to discover and interact with resources, let’s consider XHTML, one of the most popular representation formats on the World Wide Web. XHTML is used to represent information on a page (its business payload) and to link to other pages or content (its protocol description). The inclusion of links to other resources makes XHTML a hypermedia format. As humans, we take this property for granted. We use web browsers to move from one page to another without thinking of the underlying mechanics (which is a good thing, of course). Browsers apply the hypermedia tenet and interpret links to show possible transitions from one resource (page) to another.

The Web is agnostic to the representation formats exchanged by consumers and services, which is one of the primary reasons for its success in diverse domains. But when it comes to hypermedia, not all formats are equal.

Hypermedia Dead Ends

Despite the success of hypermedia formats on the Web, today’s distributed applications typically use nonhypermedia formats such as plain XML to integrate systems. Although XML is easy to use as a data interchange format, and despite its near ubiquity, it is utterly oblivious to the Web. This is neatly demonstrated by our humble order ...

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