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REST in Practice

Cover of REST in Practice by Ian Robinson... Published by O'Reilly Media, Inc.
  1. REST in Practice
    1. SPECIAL OFFER: Upgrade this ebook with O’Reilly
    2. Foreword
    3. Preface
      1. Should I Read This Book?
      2. Should I Skip This Book?
      3. Resources
      4. What Did You Think About the Book?
      5. Errata
      6. Conventions Used in This Book
      7. Using Code Examples
      8. How to Contact Us
      9. Safari® Books Online
      10. Acknowledgments
    4. 1. The Web As a Platform for Building Distributed Systems
      1. Architecture of the Web
      2. Thinking in Resources
      3. From the Web Architecture to the REST Architectural Style
      4. The Web As an Application Platform
      5. Web Friendliness and the Richardson Maturity Model
      6. GET on Board
    5. 2. Introducing Restbucks: How to GET a Coffee, Web Style
      1. Restbucks: A Little Coffee Shop with Global Ambitions
      2. Toolbox
      3. Here Comes the Web
    6. 3. Basic Web Integration
      1. Lose Weight, Feel Great!
      2. A Simple Coffee Ordering System
      3. URI Templates
      4. URI Tunneling
      5. POX: Plain Old XML over HTTP
      6. We Are Just Getting Started
    7. 4. CRUD Web Services
      1. Modeling Orders As Resources
      2. Building CRUD Services
      3. Aligning Resource State
      4. Consuming CRUD Services
      5. Consuming Services Automatically with WADL
      6. CRUD Is Good, but It’s Not Great
    8. 5. Hypermedia Services
      1. The Hypermedia Tenet
      2. Hypermedia Formats
      3. Contracts
      4. Hypermedia Protocols
      5. Implementing a Hypermedia Service
      6. Building the Ordering Service in Java
      7. Building the Ordering Service in .NET
      8. Ready, Set, Action
    9. 6. Scaling Out
      1. GET Back to Basics
      2. Caching
      3. Making Content Cacheable
      4. Implementing Caching in .NET
      5. Consistency
      6. Extending Freshness
      7. Stay Fresh
    10. 7. The Atom Syndication Format
      1. The Format
      2. Common Uses for Atom
      3. Using Atom for Event-Driven Systems
      4. Building an Atom Service in Java
      5. Building an Atom Service in .NET
      6. Atom Everywhere?
      7. After the Event
    11. 8. Atom Publishing Protocol
      1. Atom Publishing Protocol
      2. Implementing Order Fulfillment Using AtomPub
      3. Implementing AtomPub in .NET
      4. A Versatile Protocol
    12. 9. Web Security
      1. HTTP Security Essentials
      2. Identity and the OpenID Protocol
      3. The OAuth Protocol
      4. Service Hacks and Defenses
      5. Final Thoughts
    13. 10. Semantics
      1. Syntax Versus Semantics
      2. Structure and Representation of Information
      3. The Semantic Web
      4. Microformats
      5. Linked Data and the Web
      6. Guidance
    14. 11. The Web and WS-*
      1. Are Web Services Evil?
      2. SOAP: The Whole Truth
      3. WSDL: Just Another Object IDL
      4. Two Wrongs Don’t Make a Right
      5. Secure, Reliable, Transacted
      6. A Requiem for Web Services?
    15. 12. Building the Case for the Web
      1. No More Silver Bullets
      2. Building and Running Web-Based Services
      3. No Architecture Without Measurement
      4. Selling the Web
      5. Go Forth and Build
    16. Index
    17. About the Authors
    18. Colophon
    19. SPECIAL OFFER: Upgrade this ebook with O’Reilly

Chapter 2. Introducing Restbucks: How to GET a Coffee, Web Style

WHILE DEVELOPING THIS BOOK, we wondered how we would describe web-based distributed systems in an accessible scenario. We weren’t really keen on the idea of yet another e-commerce or trading application. We thought it would have been too boring. We certainly wouldn’t want to read a book like that, so why write one?

Instead, we chose a modest scenario that doesn’t try to steal the focus from the technical discussion or try to become the star of the book. We didn’t want to engage in long explanations about complex problem domains. So, in that spirit, this is the only chapter where we’ll discuss our domain in depth. The other chapters will deal with technical concepts.

The inspiration for our problem domain came from Gregor Hohpe’s brilliant observation on how a Starbucks coffee shop works. In his popular blog entry, Gregor talks about synchronous and asynchronous messaging, transactions, and scaling the message-processing pipeline in an everyday situation.[14]

We liked the approach very much, and as believers that “imitation is the sincerest form of flattery,” we adopted Gregor’s scenario at the heart of this book. We freely admit that our need for good coffee while writing also encouraged us to focus on our own little coffee megastore: Restbucks.

Restbucks: A Little Coffee Shop with Global Ambitions

Throughout this book, we’ll frame our problems and web-based solutions in terms of a coffee shop called Restbucks, which grows ...

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