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Regional and Urban Economics Parts 1 & 2

Book Description

A collection of the first section of the "Fundamentals of Pure and Applied Economics" series, "Regional and Urban Economics: Parts One and Two" is an encyclopaedia containing eight titles:
This volume highlights original contributions in regional and urban economics, concentrating mainly on urban economic theory. The contributions focus on the treatment of space in economic theory. Drawing on the body of literature developed by Von Thunen, Christaller and Losch, these chapters explore empirical, theoretical and applied aspects of urban and regional economics which can be divided into the following areas:
Location Theory, "Jean Jaskold Gabszewicz, Jacques-Francois Thisse, Masahisa Fujita "and" Urs Schwiezer"
Urban Public Finance, "David E. Wildasin"
Urban Dynamics and Urban Externalities, "Takahiro Miyao "and" Yoshitsugu" "Kanemoto"
Systems of Cities and Facility Location,

Table of Contents

  1. Cover
  2. Halftitle
  3. Title
  4. Copyright
  5. Contents
  6. Introduction
  7. General Equilibrium in Space and Agglomeration
    1. 0. Introduction
    2. 1. Spatially Separated Markets
    3. 2. Introducing Location Choice
      1. 2.1. The model: classification of problems
      2. 2.2. The first welfare theorem
    4. 3. Integer Assignment
    5. 4. Fractional Assignment
      1. 4.1. The second welfare theorem
      2. 4.2. Equilibrium: the separable case
      3. 4.3. The club assignment problem
    6. 5. Local Public Goods
      1. 5.1. The first best problem
      2. 5.2. Tiebout equilibrium
    7. 6. Concluding Remarks
    8. References
  8. Spatial Competition and the Location of Firms
    1. 1. Introduction
    2. 2. Spatial Monopoly
      1. 2.1. Delivered pricing
      2. 2.2. Mill pricing
    3. 3. The Basic Ingredients of Spatial Competition
      1. 3.1. The concept of industry
      2. 3.2. The structure of demand in the industry
      3. 3.3. The definition of equilibrium in the industry
    4. 4. Spatial Oligopolistic Competition
      1. 4.1. Variable prices and parametric locations
      2. 4.2. Variable locations and parametric prices
      3. 4.3. Variable prices and locations
    5. 5. Spatial Competition with Free Entry
      1. 5.1. Spatial monopolistic competition
      2. 5.2. Sequential entry
    6. 6. Reformulations and Conclusions
    7. References
    8. Appendix
  9. Urban Land Use Theory
    1. 0. Introduction
    2. 1. Basic Theory of Residential Land Use
      1. 1.1. Locational choice of the household
      2. 1.2. Equilibrium land use
      3. 1.3. Optimal land use, optimal vs. equilibrium
      4. 1.4. Some extensions
    3. 2. Residential Land Use with Externalities
      1. 2.1. Local public goods and location of public facilities
      2. 2.2. Neighborhood externalities
      3. 2.3. Transport congestion and land use for transport
    4. 3. General Equilibrium Models
      1. 3.1. Prototypes of general equilibrium models
      2. 3.2. Port city model: Type A
      3. 3.3. Spatial externality models: Type B
      4. 3.4. Imperfect competition model: Type C
    5. 4. Dynamics
      1. 4.1. Prototypes of dynamic models
      2. 4.2. One sector model
      3. 4.3. Urban sprawl
      4. 4.4. Urban renewal, filtering process, and land development under uncertainty
      5. 4.5. Suggestions for further research
    6. References
  10. Externalities in Space
    1. 1. Introduction
    2. 2. Externalities between Producers and Households
    3. 3. Externalities among Households
    4. 4. Externalities among Producers
    5. 5. Externalities Associated with Urban Transportation
    6. 6. Measuring the Benefits and Costs of Externalities
    7. References
  11. Urban Transportation Economics
    1. 1. Introduction
      1. 1.1. The scope of urban transportation economics
      2. 1.2. The scope of this review
    2. 2. Travel Demand
      1. 2.1. Aggregate models
      2. 2.2. Disaggregate models
      3. 2.3. Examples of disaggregate models
      4. 2.4. Assessment of travel-demand models
      5. 2.5. Value of time
      6. 2.6. Conclusions
    3. 3. Costs
      1. 3.1. The nature of cost functions
      2. 3.2. Cost functions for public transit
      3. 3.3. Highway travel: congestion technology
      4. 3.4. Highway travel: short-run variable costs
      5. 3.5. Highway travel: long-run costs
      6. 3.6. Intermodal cost comparisons
    4. 4. Pricing, Investment, and Industrial Organization
      1. 4.1. Congestion pricing of highways
      2. 4.2. Pricing of parking
      3. 4.3. Pricing of public transit
      4. 4.4. Capacity choice for highways
      5. 4.5. Cost-benefit analysis
      6. 4.6. Regulation and private provision of transportation
      7. 4.7. Conclusions
    5. 5. Conclusion: Toward Unified Models of Urban Transportation
    6. Appendix: Long-Run Cost Functions with Queueing and Endogenous Scheduling
    7. References
    8. Acknowledgment
    9. Selected Symbols and Abbreviations
  12. Facility Location Analysis
    1. Introduction
    2. 1. Facility Location in Continuous Spaces
      1. 1.1. Introduction
      2. 1.2. The minisum problem
      3. 1.3. Extensions
      4. 1.4. The minimax problem
      5. 1.5. The multifacility location problem
      6. 1.6. The location of an obnoxious facility
    3. 2. Facility Location in Finite Spaces
      1. 2.1. Introduction
      2. 2.2. The uncapacitated facility location problem (UFLP)
      3. 2.3. Extensions
      4. 2.4. The K-median problem
      5. 2.5. The covering problems
      6. 2.6. The K-center problem
      7. 2.7. Spatial-interaction-based allocation models
    4. 3. Facility Location on Networks
      1. 3.1. Introduction
      2. 3.2. The model
      3. 3.3. The minisum problem
      4. 3.4. The minimax problem
      5. 3.5. The multifacility location problems
      6. 3.6. Miscellaneous problems
    5. 4. Conclusion
    6. References
  13. Systems of Cities and Inter-City Trade
    1. Introduction
    2. Part One – Positive Analyses
    3. 1. Cities and the structure of the economy
    4. 2. Basic properties of a system of cities
    5. 3. Economic growth and international trade
    6. Part Two – Normative Properties
    7. 1. A static model
    8. References