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Real World SharePoint® 2007: Indispensable Experiences from 16 MOSS and WSS MVPs

Book Description

Microsoft recognizes key individuals who contribute significantly to the community of technologists through the Microsoft Most Valuable Professional (MVP) award. These individuals are active authors, speakers, bloggers, and innovators. They are also skilled network engineers, developers, trainers, designers, and architects. In the SharePoint community, these MVPs are recognized for their expertise in either Windows SharePoint Services (WSS) or Microsoft Office SharePoint Server (MOSS).

This book represents the efforts of 16 MVPs in the SharePoint community to present core areas of SharePoint 2007 products and technologies seasoned with significant field experience. The idea behind the book is to lower the learning curve for the reader, while providing the insight necessary to avoid common missteps. This book is an extension of the work the authors have done in their own blogs, books, and presentations.

This book is for the community of SharePoint professionals. That means that architects, designers, developers, administrators, and engineers all will find something useful in its pages. As a reader, you will want to focus on chapters that appeal to your areas of expertise directly. Some of the chapters, for example, assume a strong programming background, whereas others are centered on administration or maintenance. All readers should have some prior experience with SharePoint 2007 products and technologies to get the most out of this book, although the book does include an introductory chapter for those who are just getting started. The authors generally assume a working knowledge of SharePoint in an effort to focus the discussion on implementation and best practices.

This book covers SharePoint 2007 products and technologies. Specifically, you will find topics relating to both WSS and MOSS. The topics were selected by SharePoint MVP and Editor Scot Hiller based on the authors' capabilities to represent a cross-section of the most important areas within SharePoint. Although the chapters have been arranged in a logical order, they are intended to stand alone as independent articles.

Specifically, here's what the book covers:

  • Introduction to SharePoint by Mike Walsh: an overview of SharePoint

  • Configuring Forms Based Authentication by Stacy Draper: different approaches to FBA, along with their strengths and weaknesses including some custom solutions to problems such as user and role management.

  • Understanding SharePoint Administration by Todd Klindt: the basics (such as backup and recovery), more advanced topics (such as command-line utilities and tips), and techniques for managing site templates.

  • Developing Publishing Sites the Smart and Structured Way by Andrew Connell: an alternative technique for developing Publishing sites within MOSS discusses development with the SharePoint Designer (SPD), but then challenges the conventional thinking with a new structured approach. Readers will learn new ways to ease the management and maintenance of Publishing sites.

    Using SharePoint Designer 2007 by Dustin Miller: This often-maligned tool can be a powerful part of your SharePoint toolkit.

  • Customizing and Branding the SharePoint 2007 Interface by Shane Perran and Heather Solomon: One of the first tasks in any SharePoint project is branding the use interface. The reader will learn all of the different ways to customize the look and feel of SharePoint using master pages, style sheets, and graphics.

  • Understanding Web Parts by Jan Tielens: walks the reader through the creation and deployment of Web Parts. Readers should have a strong C# programming background.

  • Creating Workflows in WSS by Robert Bogue: Readers will learn how to create custom workflows and forms for deployment in WSS including many tips and tricks from actual field experience. Readers should have a strong C# programming background.

  • Creating Workflow in SharePoint Server 2007 by Joris Poelmans: The big difference between WSS and MOSS workflows is the ability to use InfoPath forms. This has extensive coverage of InfoPath forms and how to use them with MOSS workflows.

  • Using the Business Data Catalog by Nick Swan: The Business Data Catalog (BDC) is used to allow MOSS to access line-of-business databases. Includes tips to make the development process easier. Readers should be familiar with XML.

  • Using Excel Services by Luis Du Solier Grinda: Excel Services is used to allow MOSS to present spreadsheet data to end users through a browser. This technology is a foundational element in the development of dashboards in the SharePoint Report Center.

  • Securing SharePoint Communication by Adam Buenz: Readers will learn to implement Secure Sockets Layer (SSL), Kerberos security, and how to use the Microsoft Internet Security and Acceleration (ISA) Server.

  • Using Information Rights Management by Jason Medero: setting up IRM and using it with SharePoint libraries to restrict document functionality (such as printing and attaching) so sensitive information does not leave an organization.

  • Upgrading from SPS 2003 to MOSS 2007 Using the Gradual Method by Shane Young: One of the biggest trends in the SharePoint community is upgrading from SharePoint Portal Server 2003 (SPS 2003) to MOSS. This examines all of the different upgrade approaches, and then walks the reader through the gradual method for upgrading. Contains a wealth of field experience learned from performing many upgrades.

  • This book is also available as part of the 4-book SharePoint 2007 Wrox Box (ISBN: 0470431946) with these 4 books:

  • Professional SharePoint 2007 Development (ISBN: 0470117567)

  • Real World SharePoint 2007 (ISBN: 0470168358)

  • Professional Microsoft SharePoint 2007 Design (ISBN: 047028580X)

  • Professional SharePoint 2007 Web Content Management Development (ISBN: 0470224754)

  • Table of Contents

    1. Copyright
    2. About the Authors
    3. Credits
    4. Foreword
    5. Introduction
      1. Who This Book Is For
      2. How This Book Is Structured
      3. What You Need to Use This Book
      4. Conventions
      5. Source Code
      6. Errata
      7. p2p.wrox.com
    6. 1. Introduction to SharePoint
      1. 1.1. Looking at the Old and New
      2. 1.2. Installing WSS 3.0
      3. 1.3. Licensing
      4. 1.4. The Components of the Standard Web Site
        1. 1.4.1. Libraries and Lists
        2. 1.4.2. Web Parts
      5. 1.5. Options Within Lists
        1. 1.5.1. Views
          1. 1.5.1.1. Creating a View
          2. 1.5.1.2. Amending the Home Page
        2. 1.5.2. Folders
      6. 1.6. Security
        1. 1.6.1. Permission Level
        2. 1.6.2. Anonymous Access
      7. 1.7. The Home Page — Again
        1. 1.7.1. Web Part Connections
        2. 1.7.2. A Few Nice Improvements
      8. 1.8. Interaction with Browsers and Clients
      9. 1.9. WSS 3.0 and Office 2007 Working Together
        1. 1.9.1. Access 2007
        2. 1.9.2. Excel 2007
        3. 1.9.3. Outlook 2007
      10. 1.10. Ways to See What's New
        1. 1.10.1. Alerts
        2. 1.10.2. RSS Feeds
        3. 1.10.3. Search Functions
      11. 1.11. Additional Areas of Interest
        1. 1.11.1. Customizing a Site
        2. 1.11.2. Virus Checking
        3. 1.11.3. Backup/Restore
        4. 1.11.4. Workflow
        5. 1.11.5. Wikis and Blogs
      12. 1.12. For More Information
      13. 1.13. Summary
    7. 2. Configuring Forms Based Authentication
      1. 2.1. Creating a Simple User Store
        1. 2.1.1. Creating a Database Using aspnet_regsql.exe
        2. 2.1.2. Preparing to Use the Web Site Administration Tool
          1. 2.1.2.1. Creating a Project in Visual Studio 2005
          2. 2.1.2.2. Connecting to the ASP.NET Application Database
        3. 2.1.3. Working with the Web Site Administration Tool
      2. 2.2. Creating SharePoint Applications
        1. 2.2.1. Modifying the Host File
        2. 2.2.2. Creating Two Sites that Point to the Same Content
          1. 2.2.2.1. Creating the Intranet Site
          2. 2.2.2.2. Creating an Internet Site
        3. 2.2.3. Modifying web.config Files
          1. 2.2.3.1. Modifying Central Administration web.config
          2. 2.2.3.2. Modifying My Site Host Site web.config
          3. 2.2.3.3. Modifying the SSP web.config
          4. 2.2.3.4. Modifying the aspnet web.config
      3. 2.3. Configuring SharePoint for FBA, Authentication Providers, and Permissions
        1. 2.3.1. Setting FBA and Authentication Providers for Intranet
        2. 2.3.2. Setting FBA and Authentication Providers for the Personalization
        3. 2.3.3. Setting Permissions
          1. 2.3.3.1. Setting Site Collection Administrator
          2. 2.3.3.2. Adding ASP.NET Application Database Users to the Intranet Site
          3. 2.3.3.3. Setting Personalization Permissions
        4. 2.3.4. Creating a login.aspx
      4. 2.4. Building a Custom Application to Manage Users in the Application Database
        1. 2.4.1. ASP.NET Objects and Methods
        2. 2.4.2. Getting a Head Start with the Toolbox
        3. 2.4.3. Development Tip
      5. 2.5. Active Directory for Application Mode as a User Store
      6. 2.6. Custom Providers
      7. 2.7. Consider Using Internet Security and Acceleration Server
      8. 2.8. Summary
    8. 3. Understanding SharePoint Administration
      1. 3.1. Central Administration
        1. 3.1.1. Backups
        2. 3.1.2. Restore
        3. 3.1.3. New Operational Features
          1. 3.1.3.1. Incoming Email
        4. 3.1.4. Web Applications
        5. 3.1.5. Alternate Access Mappings and Zones
          1. 3.1.5.1. Zones and Authentication Methods
      2. 3.2. STSADM
        1. 3.2.1. Introduction to STSADM
        2. 3.2.2. Using STSADM
        3. 3.2.3. Backup and Recovery with STSADM
        4. 3.2.4. Managing Web Applications and Zones with STSADM
        5. 3.2.5. Feature Management with STSADM
        6. 3.2.6. Tricks with STSADM
      3. 3.3. Summary
    9. 4. Developing Publishing Sites the Smart and Structured Way
      1. 4.1. Conventional Approach to Developing a Publishing Site
      2. 4.2. Challenges Presented by the Conventional Approach
        1. 4.2.1. Creating the Site Infrastructure with the SharePoint Browser Interface
        2. 4.2.2. Creating Site Layout Files with Office SPD 2007
      3. 4.3. A Better Approach to Developing Publishing Sites
        1. 4.3.1. The Feature and Solution Framework
          1. 4.3.1.1. Understanding Features
          2. 4.3.1.2. Understanding Solutions
          3. 4.3.1.3. Benefits of Features and Solutions
        2. 4.3.2. Using Features and Solutions to Deploy Site Infrastructure and Layout Files
          1. 4.3.2.1. Creating a Feature
          2. 4.3.2.2. Creating Site Columns with Features
          3. 4.3.2.3. Creating Content Types with Features
          4. 4.3.2.4. Provisioning Files with Features
          5. 4.3.2.5. Module Node Overview
          6. 4.3.2.6. File Node Overview
          7. 4.3.2.7. Property Node Overview
          8. 4.3.2.8. Testing the Site Infrastructure and Layout File Feature
        3. 4.3.3. Disadvantages to Using Features and Solutions for Deployment
          1. 4.3.3.1. Tedious to Build
          2. 4.3.3.2. No Debugging Support
          3. 4.3.3.3. Provisioning Files Requires Double Development
          4. 4.3.3.4. Feature Deactivation and Solution Retraction Leaves Artifacts
        4. 4.3.4. Advantages to Using Features and Solutions for Deployment
          1. 4.3.4.1. Keep Layout Files Uncustomized
          2. 4.3.4.2. Easy Deployment to Multiple Sites
          3. 4.3.4.3. Easy Deployment to Multiple Environments
          4. 4.3.4.4. Fully Utilize Source Control Management
          5. 4.3.4.5. Full Control of Site Column and Content Types
      4. 4.4. Tips, Tricks, and Traps
        1. 4.4.1. Trick: Visual Studio 2005 XML Schema Cache
          1. 4.4.1.1. Adding the SharePoint XML Schema One File at a Time
          2. 4.4.1.2. Adding the SharePoint XML Schema to the Visual Studio 2005 XML Schema Cache
        2. 4.4.2. Trick: Leveraging MSBuild with MakeCab.EXE to Create Automated Solution Packages
        3. 4.4.3. Tip: Use the SharePoint API
        4. 4.4.4. Trick: AC's WCM Custom Commands for STSADM.EXE
        5. 4.4.5. Trap: Publishing Field Types
        6. 4.4.6. Trap: Site Column Updates Don't Take Effect
        7. 4.4.7. Trap: Content Type Updates Don't Cascade
      5. 4.5. Parting Thoughts
      6. 4.6. Summary
    10. 5. Using SharePoint Designer 2007
      1. 5.1. Appreciating SharePoint Designer
      2. 5.2. Using SPD for Web Design
        1. 5.2.1. Standards Compliance
        2. 5.2.2. Designing for Accessibility
        3. 5.2.3. IntelliSense for JavaScript and CSS
          1. 5.2.3.1. Interacting with JavaScript in Code View
          2. 5.2.3.2. Interacting with CSS in Code View
      3. 5.3. Using SPD for SharePoint Sites
        1. 5.3.1. Master Pages
          1. 5.3.1.1. Modifying the default.master for a Team Site
        2. 5.3.2. The Data View Web Part
          1. 5.3.2.1. Connecting to a SharePoint List
          2. 5.3.2.2. Conditional Formatting
          3. 5.3.2.3. Connecting to an RSS Feed and Passing Parameters
          4. 5.3.2.4. Connecting to a Web Service
      4. 5.4. Customized (Unghosted) and Uncustomized (Ghosted) Pages
      5. 5.5. There's So Much More
      6. 5.6. Summary
    11. 6. Customizing and Branding the SharePoint 2007 Interface
      1. 6.1. An Overview of SharePoint 2007 Customization Options
        1. 6.1.1. Out-of-the-Box, "No Code Required" Customization
        2. 6.1.2. Developer-Focused Customizations
          1. 6.1.2.1. Master Pages
          2. 6.1.2.2. Page Layouts
          3. 6.1.2.3. Cascading Style Sheets
          4. 6.1.2.4. Site Templates
          5. 6.1.2.5. Site Definitions
      2. 6.2. Choosing Customization Options that Are Right for Your Organization
        1. 6.2.1. Matching Business Needs with Customization Paths
      3. 6.3. Practical Customization Solutions that Work in the Real World
        1. 6.3.1. Getting Started
        2. 6.3.2. Understanding Custom Master Pages
          1. 6.3.2.1. Creating and Specifying a Custom Master Page
        3. 6.3.3. Using SPURL to Specify Site or Site Collection Relative Paths
          1. 6.3.3.1. Specifying Site and Collection Relative Paths with SPURL
        4. 6.3.4. Specifying an Alternate Style Sheet
          1. 6.3.4.1. Specifying and Modifying an Alternate Style Sheet
        5. 6.3.5. Controlling Content Creation with Page Layouts
          1. 6.3.5.1. Creating a Custom Page Layout
      4. 6.4. CSS and SharePoint
        1. 6.4.1. Understanding the Relevance of CSS
        2. 6.4.2. What Is CSS?
        3. 6.4.3. Utilizing CSS with SharePoint
        4. 6.4.4. Personally Utilizing CSS
        5. 6.4.5. Understanding Where the Styles Are Stored
      5. 6.5. CSS Core Concepts
        1. 6.5.1. The CSS Statement
        2. 6.5.2. Grouping
          1. 6.5.2.1. Grouping the Selectors
          2. 6.5.2.2. Grouping the Declaration Properties
        3. 6.5.3. Inheritance
        4. 6.5.4. Contextual Selectors
        5. 6.5.5. Cascading
        6. 6.5.6. Multiple Classes for a Single Element
      6. 6.6. Location, Reference, and Override Order
        1. 6.6.1. Where to Store Your CSS Files
          1. 6.6.1.1. On the Web Server
          2. 6.6.1.2. In the Content Database
        2. 6.6.2. How to Reference the CSS Files in Your Code or in the Site
          1. 6.6.2.1. Including Styles in the Master Page
          2. 6.6.2.2. Adding Styles Directly to the Master Page
          3. 6.6.2.3. Importing Styles into the Master Page
          4. 6.6.2.4. Linking Styles to the Master Page
          5. 6.6.2.5. Using Site Settings to Reference a CSS File
          6. 6.6.2.6. Testing Your Styles in the Browser
      7. 6.7. You Are Ready to Start Styling!
        1. 6.7.1. How to Override SharePoint Styles
          1. 6.7.1.1. How to Identify Selectors, IDs, and Class Names for a SharePoint Style
          2. 6.7.1.2. How to Find Declarations for a SharePoint Style
          3. 6.7.1.3. How to Change the Declarations of Your Copy of the SharePoint Style
      8. 6.8. Navigation
      9. 6.9. Applying What You Have Learned
        1. 6.9.1. Step One: Master Pages
        2. 6.9.2. Step Two: Master CSS File
        3. 6.9.3. Step Three: Division-Specific CSS Files
        4. 6.9.4. Step Four: Alter Subsite Settings
        5. 6.9.5. Step Five: Sit Back and Relax!
      10. 6.10. Summary
    12. 7. Understanding Web Parts
      1. 7.1. Web Part History
      2. 7.2. Key Concepts of Web Parts
      3. 7.3. Your Development Environment
      4. 7.4. The Traditional Hello World Example
        1. 7.4.1. Writing the Code
        2. 7.4.2. Deploying the Web Part
          1. 7.4.2.1. Deploying to the BIN Folder
          2. 7.4.2.2. Deploying to the Global Assembly Cache
          3. 7.4.2.3. Differences Between the GAC and the BIN Folder
          4. 7.4.2.4. The Assembly Name
        3. 7.4.3. Trusting the Web Part
        4. 7.4.4. Advertising the Web Part
        5. 7.4.5. Testing the Web Part
        6. 7.4.6. Debugging the Web Part
        7. 7.4.7. Process of Building, Deploying, and Testing
      5. 7.5. Using HTML and Controls in Web Parts
        1. 7.5.1. Building HTML in Web Parts
          1. 7.5.1.1. Rendering Opening Tags
          2. 7.5.1.2. Rendering Closing Tags
          3. 7.5.1.3. Writing Attributes
          4. 7.5.1.4. An Example: The TableDemo Web Part
        2. 7.5.2. Using Controls in Web Parts
          1. 7.5.2.1. Simple Calculator Example
          2. 7.5.2.2. Getting Started with the SimpleCalculator Class
          3. 7.5.2.3. Declaring the Web Control Variables
          4. 7.5.2.4. Overriding the CreateChildControls Method
          5. 7.5.2.5. Adding Event Handlers
          6. 7.5.2.6. The Full SimpleCalculator Code
          7. 7.5.2.7. Using the SimpleCalculator Web Part
          8. 7.5.2.8. Manually Rendering the Web Controls
      6. 7.6. Building Connectable Web Parts
        1. 7.6.1. Connectable Web Part Scenarios
        2. 7.6.2. Using the Out-of-the-Box Connectable Web Parts
        3. 7.6.3. Text Communication Example
          1. 7.6.3.1. Defining the Connection Interface
          2. 7.6.3.2. The SimpleProvider Class
          3. 7.6.3.3. The SimpleConsumer Class
          4. 7.6.3.4. Using the SimpleProvider and SimpleConsumer Web Parts
      7. 7.7. Building Web Parts the Smart Way
        1. 7.7.1. Introducing the Web User Control Technique
          1. 7.7.1.1. Building the Web User Control
          2. 7.7.1.2. Deploying the Web User Control
          3. 7.7.1.3. Building the Wrapper Web Part
        2. 7.7.2. Introducing the SmartPart
          1. 7.7.2.1. Using the SmartPart
        3. 7.7.3. Connectable Web User Controls
          1. 7.7.3.1. Building the EmployeeGrid Control
          2. 7.7.3.2. Building the OrderGrid Control
          3. 7.7.3.3. The Connectable Controls in Action
      8. 7.8. Summary
    13. 8. Creating Workflows in WSS
      1. 8.1. What Is a Workflow?
      2. 8.2. Workflow Options
        1. 8.2.1. Manual Workflow
        2. 8.2.2. Out-of-the-Box Workflows
        3. 8.2.3. SharePoint Designer 2007
        4. 8.2.4. Event Receivers
        5. 8.2.5. Custom Workflows with Visual Studio
      3. 8.3. SharePoint Background
        1. 8.3.1. Lists and Libraries
        2. 8.3.2. Content Types
        3. 8.3.3. Universal Logging Service
        4. 8.3.4. The Feature Mechanism
      4. 8.4. Filling the Toolbox
      5. 8.5. Creating a Workflow
        1. 8.5.1. Content Types
        2. 8.5.2. Creating a Workflow Project in Visual Studio
        3. 8.5.3. Completing the Create Task Activity
        4. 8.5.4. Completing OnTaskChanged
        5. 8.5.5. Completing the Code Activity
        6. 8.5.6. Completing the Delete Task Activity
      6. 8.6. Modifying the Feature to Deploy the Workflow
        1. 8.6.1. feature.xml
        2. 8.6.2. workflow.xml
        3. 8.6.3. install.bat
      7. 8.7. Associating the Workflow to a Document Library
      8. 8.8. Testing the Workflow
      9. 8.9. Debugging Workflows
        1. 8.9.1. Fault Handlers
        2. 8.9.2. Logging Messages
        3. 8.9.3. Breakpoints and Attaching to a Process
        4. 8.9.4. Common Exceptions
      10. 8.10. Summary
    14. 9. Creating Workflow in SharePoint Server 2007
      1. 9.1. Standard Workflow Templates in MOSS 2007
      2. 9.2. Using InfoPath 2007
        1. 9.2.1. Deploying InfoPath Templates to SharePoint 2007
        2. 9.2.2. Using Browser-Enabled InfoPath Forms
        3. 9.2.3. Using External Data Connections in InfoPath Forms
        4. 9.2.4. Extending Your InfoPath Templates with Code
      3. 9.3. Building Custom MOSS Workflow Solutions with Visual Studio 2005
        1. 9.3.1. SPD Workflow Authoring versus Visual Studio 2005 Workflow Development
        2. 9.3.2. Extending the Actions within SPD
          1. 9.3.2.1. Building a Custom Activity in Visual Studio 2005
          2. 9.3.2.2. Deploying the Activity Assembly
          3. 9.3.2.3. Making the Assembly Available for SPD 2007
        3. 9.3.3. Building a Custom Workflow with Visual Studio 2005
          1. 9.3.3.1. Structure of a Workflow Project
          2. 9.3.3.2. Building a Simple Workflow
      4. 9.4. Troubleshooting and Debugging SharePoint Workflows
      5. 9.5. Adding Custom InfoPath Workflow Forms
        1. 9.5.1. Modifying the Workflow Assembly
        2. 9.5.2. Design the Task Form
        3. 9.5.3. Change workflow.xml
      6. 9.6. Workflow Tips and Tricks
        1. 9.6.1. Parsing Information from a Custom Initiation or Modification Form
        2. 9.6.2. Setting Custom Status Information for a Workflow
        3. 9.6.3. Adding Multiple Approvers
        4. 9.6.4. Workflow Security Considerations
      7. 9.7. Summary
    15. 10. Using the Business Data Catalog
      1. 10.1. It's All About Entities
      2. 10.2. Describing the Application Definition File for AdventureWorks 2000
      3. 10.3. Using Out-of-the-Box Business Data
        1. 10.3.1. Business Data Web Parts
        2. 10.3.2. Business Data in Lists and Libraries
          1. 10.3.2.1. Custom Views
          2. 10.3.2.2. Workflow
        3. 10.3.3. Searching Business Data
        4. 10.3.4. User Profile Importer
        5. 10.3.5. Custom Solutions
      4. 10.4. Application Definition File Hints and Tips
      5. 10.5. Creating Web Services to Use with the BDC
      6. 10.6. BDC Meta Man
      7. 10.7. Completing the Data Life Cycle
      8. 10.8. Summary
    16. 11. Using Excel Services
      1. 11.1. Excel 2007 Improvements and Features
      2. 11.2. Overview of Excel Services
        1. 11.2.1. Unsupported Features in Excel Services
      3. 11.3. Excel Services Architecture
        1. 11.3.1. WFE Layer
          1. 11.3.1.1. Excel Web Services
          2. 11.3.1.2. Excel Web Access
        2. 11.3.2. Application Server Layer (ECS)
      4. 11.4. Enabling and Configuring Excel Services
        1. 11.4.1. Enabling Excel Services
        2. 11.4.2. Creating a Shared Services Provider
        3. 11.4.3. Configuring Excel Services
          1. 11.4.3.1. Edit Excel Services Settings
          2. 11.4.3.2. Trusted File Locations
          3. 11.4.3.3. Trusted Data Connection Libraries
          4. 11.4.3.4. Trusted Data Providers
          5. 11.4.3.5. User-Defined Function Assemblies
      5. 11.5. Publishing Data
        1. 11.5.1. Publishing Static Worksheets
        2. 11.5.2. Publishing Dynamic Worksheets
      6. 11.6. Using the EWA Web Part
        1. 11.6.1. Finding Information
        2. 11.6.2. Updating Data
        3. 11.6.3. Opening a Local Copy
        4. 11.6.4. Creating a KPI List
      7. 11.7. For More Information
      8. 11.8. Summary
    17. 12. Securing SharePoint Communication
      1. 12.1. The Breadth of SharePoint Security
      2. 12.2. Steps to SharePoint Security
      3. 12.3. Secure the Communication Layer
        1. 12.3.1. Differences Between SSL and IPSec for SharePoint
          1. 12.3.1.1. Architectural Differences Between SSL and IPSec
          2. 12.3.1.2. Using a Mixed-Mode IPSec and SSL Solution
          3. 12.3.1.3. Setting Up IPSec No Fallback Isolation Between SharePoint Servers
          4. 12.3.1.4. Creating IPSec Reusable Batch Files
          5. 12.3.1.5. Kerberos Authentication in SharePoint
          6. 12.3.1.6. Setting Up Kerberos Authentication for SharePoint
        2. 12.3.2. Certificate Solutions for Serving Clients
          1. 12.3.2.1. Using and Understanding Microsoft Certificate Services
          2. 12.3.2.2. Using SelfSSL to Create Self-Signed Certificates for SharePoint
      4. 12.4. ISA Server and SharePoint
        1. 12.4.1. Setting Up SSL Bridging with ISA Server for SharePoint
          1. 12.4.1.1. Setting Up Alternate Access Mappings (AAM)
          2. 12.4.1.2. Using an Exported SSL Certificate
          3. 12.4.1.3. Creating a Publishing Rule through the SharePoint Publishing Wizard
        2. 12.4.2. ISA and Link Translation
        3. 12.4.3. Creating Connection Verification for SharePoint Server Health Monitoring
        4. 12.4.4. Managing ISA through Scripts
        5. 12.4.5. Using a Managed Language with ISA Server Development
      5. 12.5. Summary
    18. 13. Using Information Rights Management
      1. 13.1. Laying the Foundation
      2. 13.2. Planning Rights Management Services
      3. 13.3. Identifying RMS Client Technologies
        1. 13.3.1. RMS Machine Certificates and Lockboxes
        2. 13.3.2. Rights Account Certificates/Client Licensor Certificates
        3. 13.3.3. RMS Licenses
        4. 13.3.4. RMS Client Deployment
      4. 13.4. Managing Your RMS Server
        1. 13.4.1. Administering the RMS Server
        2. 13.4.2. Securing Your RMS Server
          1. 13.4.2.1. Protecting Your RMS Databases
          2. 13.4.2.2. Managing RMS Accounts and Groups
      5. 13.5. IRM Integration
        1. 13.5.1. Configuring IRM Within SharePoint
        2. 13.5.2. IRM Integration into SharePoint Document Libraries and Lists
        3. 13.5.3. Developing Custom IRM Protectors
        4. 13.5.4. The IRM Protection Process Within SharePoint
        5. 13.5.5. Sample IRM Integration with SharePoint Scenarios
      6. 13.6. Summary
    19. 14. Upgrading from SPS 2003 to MOSS 2007 Using the Gradual Method
      1. 14.1. In-Place Upgrade
      2. 14.2. Gradual Upgrade
      3. 14.3. Database Migration
      4. 14.4. The Big Ideas! Portal
        1. 14.4.1. Branding
        2. 14.4.2. Navigation "Enhancements"
        3. 14.4.3. My Sites
        4. 14.4.4. The Portal Site Directory
        5. 14.4.5. Custom FrontPage Site Template
        6. 14.4.6. Custom Site Template
        7. 14.4.7. Sales Administration Site with a List Application
        8. 14.4.8. Office Web Components
        9. 14.4.9. Dataview Web Parts
        10. 14.4.10. That's not All!
        11. 14.4.11. Using a Couple of Analysis Tools
      5. 14.5. Performing the Upgrade Using the Gradual Method
        1. 14.5.1. A Rundown of the Gradual Upgrade Process
        2. 14.5.2. Server Requirements
        3. 14.5.3. Installing MOSS
        4. 14.5.4. Configuring MOSS
        5. 14.5.5. Upgrading Your Sites
      6. 14.6. Reviewing the Upgraded Portal
        1. 14.6.1. Branding Is Gone
        2. 14.6.2. Changes Unique to the Portal
        3. 14.6.3. Search
        4. 14.6.4. Security Confusion
        5. 14.6.5. Unghosted Pages
        6. 14.6.6. Custom Definitions
        7. 14.6.7. Web Parts
      7. 14.7. Finalizing the Upgrade
        1. 14.7.1. The Finalizing Process
        2. 14.7.2. Removing the Old
      8. 14.8. Summary