O'Reilly logo

R: Data Analysis and Visualization by Ágnes Vidovics-Dancs, Kata Váradi, Tamás Vadász, Ágnes Tuza, Balázs Árpád Szucs, Julia Molnár, Péter Medvegyev, Balázs Márkus, István Margitai, Péter Juhász, Dániel Havran, Gergely Gabler, Barbara Dömötör, Gergely Daróczi, Ádám Banai, Milán Badics, Ferenc Illés, Edina Berlinger, Bater Makhabel, Hrishi V. Mittal, Jaynal Abedin, Brett Lantz, Tony Fischetti

Stay ahead with the world's most comprehensive technology and business learning platform.

With Safari, you learn the way you learn best. Get unlimited access to videos, live online training, learning paths, books, tutorials, and more.

Start Free Trial

No credit card required

Frequency distributions

A common way of describing univariate data is with a frequency distribution. We've already seen an example of a frequency distribution when we looked at the preferences for soy ice cream at the end of the last chapter. For each flavor of ice cream (categorical variable), it depicted the count or frequency of the occurrences in the underlying data set.

To demonstrate examples of other frequency distributions, we need to find some data. Fortunately, for the convenience of useRs everywhere, R comes preloaded with almost one hundred datasets. You can view a full list if you execute help (package="datasets"). There are also hundreds more available from add on packages.

The first data set that we are going to use is mtcars—data ...

With Safari, you learn the way you learn best. Get unlimited access to videos, live online training, learning paths, books, interactive tutorials, and more.

Start Free Trial

No credit card required