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QuickBooks 2013 For Dummies by Stephen L. Nelson, MBA, CPA

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The Other Lists

Throughout the preceding sections, I cover almost all the most important lists. A few others I haven’t talked about yet are Fixed Asset, Price Level, Billing Rate Level, Sales Tax Code, Classes, Other Names, Sales Rep, Customer Type, Vendor Type, Job Type, Terms, Customer Messages, Payment Method, Ship Via, Vehicle, and Memorized Transactions. I don’t give blow-by-blow descriptions of how you use these lists because you don’t really need them. The other QuickBooks lists are generally more than adequate. You can usually use the standard lists as is without building other lists.

Just so I don’t leave you stranded, however, I want to give you quick-and-dirty descriptions of these other lists and what they do.

tip.eps To see some of these lists, choose the list from the Lists menu or choose Lists⇒Customer & Vendor Profile Lists and choose the list from the submenu that QuickBooks displays.

The Fixed Asset Item list

If you buy fixed assets — things such as vehicles, various pieces of furniture, miscellaneous hunks of equipment, and so on — somebody is supposed to track this stuff in a list. Why? You need to have this information at your fingertips (or at your accountant’s fingertips) to calculate depreciation. And if you later dispose of some item, you need this information to calculate the gain or loss on the sale of the item.

For these reasons, QuickBooks includes a Fixed Asset ...

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