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Quantum Mechanics for Scientists and Engineers by David A. B. Miller

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Chapter 18

Quantum information

Prerequisites: Chapters 25, 9, 10, 12, and 13.

When we think of processing information, we are typically used to a classical world in which we represent information in terms of the classical state of an object. For example, we could represent a number as the length of some particular rod in meters or the value of some electrical potential in volts; these would be analog representations. More typically in information processing, we represent numbers and other information digitally, in binary form as a sequence of “bits” that are either “1” or “0”. We can use all sorts of physical representations for the 1 and 0, such as an object being “up” or “down,” a device being “on” (e.g., passing current) or “off’ (e.g., not ...

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