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QlikView Your Business by Lars Bjork, Charlie Leichtweis, Tammy Gibson, Oleg Troyansky

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Chapter 5 Data Modeling for Sales Analysis

Now that you’ve seen how the initial user stories can be visualized, the next step is to begin the data modeling process. Because QlikView makes it so easy to quickly load data and create visualizations, the data modeling step sometimes gets overlooked, or at least skimmed over.

A properly designed data model should be:

  • Accurate—Without confidence in the data, your project will fail.
  • Easy to use—Developers and analysts who create the visualizations can find data elements easily.
  • Understandable—A non-technical business person can look at a diagram of the data model and say, “Yep—that’s how my business works.”
  • Fast—For the end user, sheet navigation and chart rendering is fast.
  • Scalable—A developer can add elements and significant row volume without redesigning the entire model.

For the data modeler, these are not trivial goals. How do you make sure that your model delivers on expectations? Understanding the fundamentals of data modeling is key.

So, what exactly is a data model, and how does one go about the business of designing it? Generally speaking, a data model is the logical representation of how data from multiple tables are related. Data modeling describes the process of crafting a database design (what goes in the tables and how they are related) that best serves the applications that use it. In QlikView, you write ...

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