You are previewing Public Health Genomics and International Wealth Creation.
O'Reilly logo
Public Health Genomics and International Wealth Creation

Book Description

In 2003, the secrets of the human genome were cracked open, creating a flurry of anticipation (and more than a little commercial buzz) about the role that genetic modification would play in years to come. This burgeoning field stands poised to redefine old paradigms and reshape industries such as medicine, agriculture, pharmacology, and biotechnology. Public Health Genomics and International Wealth Creation seeks to explore new opportunities and challenges in genomic commercialization by presenting a roadmap of current research, setting forth clear guidelines for how genomics can be wielded safely and ethically in a manner concordant with public welfare. Addressing problems such as chronic disease, world hunger, and global economic disparity, this book is an essential reference source for doctors, bioethicists, human genome specialists, and scientists in the fields of genetics and genomics. This authored monograph contains chapters on topics ranging from agronomics and biotechnology to commercial genomics, genome sequencing, cancer genomics, and more.

Table of Contents

  1. Cover
  2. Title Page
  3. Copyright Page
  4. Book Series
    1. Mission
    2. Coverage
  5. Foreword
  6. Preface
  7. Acknowledgment
  8. Chapter 1: Introduction to Genomics Sequencing
    1. ABSTRACT
    2. WHAT IS GENOMICS?
    3. MODERN PIONEERS IN GENOMIC SCIENCE
    4. HUMAN GENOME SEQUENCING CENTERS WORLDWIDE
    5. CAREER PATH IN PUBLIC HEALTH IN THE AGE OF GENOMIC SCIENCE
    6. CONCLUSION
    7. REFERENCES
  9. Chapter 2: Genomics Applications in Public Health
    1. ABSTRACT
    2. INTRODUCTION
    3. GENOMIC APPLICATIONS IN PUBLIC HEALTH
    4. PRECISION MEDICINE (THE P4 MEDICINE)
    5. IMPACT OF PRECISION (P4) MEDICINE
    6. REFERENCES
  10. Chapter 3: Genomic Epidemiology of Human Papillomavirus (HPV), Prostate Cancer, and Diabetes
    1. ABSTRACT
    2. PART I: GENOMIC EPIDEMIOLOGY OF PROSTATE CANCER AND HPV
    3. GENOMIC EPIDEMIOLOGY OF HPV
    4. PART II: GENOMIC EPIDEMIOLOGY OF PROSTATE CANCER AND ITS ASSOCIATED RISK FACTORS
    5. RELEVANCE OF FAMILY HISTORY
    6. PART III: GENOMIC EPIDEMIOLOGY OF TYPE 2 DIABETES, PHARMACOGENOMICS, AND PRIMARY PREVENTION
    7. PHARMACOGENOMICS
    8. INNOVATIVE (P4) MEDICINE: PREDICTIVE, PREVENTIVE, PERSONALIZED, AND PARTICIPATORY
    9. NUTRITIONAL INTERVENTIONS/NUTRIGENOMICS
    10. RELEVANT HEALTH EDUCATION
    11. ACKNOWLEDGMENT
    12. REFERENCES
  11. Chapter 4: Global Genomic Response to Neonatal Screening
    1. ABSTRACT
    2. PART I: ETHICS OF NEONATAL SCREENING FOR SICKLE CELL ANEMIA
    3. CONCLUSION
    4. PART II: CLINICAL SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH APPROACH TO EVALUATE THE TARGETED FILTER PAPER SCREENING FOR SICKLE CELL DISEASE: EFFECTIVENESS, FREQUENCY, AND FOLLOW-THROUGH
    5. WHAT IS SICKLE CELL DISEASE?
    6. OBJECTIVES OF THE STUDY
    7. ACKNOWLEDGMENT
    8. REFERENCES
  12. Chapter 5: Biotechnology, Human Genome Sequencing Technologies, and the Medical, Public Health, and Wealth Creation Initiatives in the Industrialized G8 Nations
    1. ABSTRACT
    2. INTRODUCTION
    3. REFERENCES
  13. Chapter 6: Wealth Creation, Establishing Genome Sequencing Centers, and the Thematic Units in the Developing Nations and the Potential Medical, Public Health, and Economic Implications
    1. ABSTRACT
    2. PART I: CHALLENGES AND SUCCESSES OF HUMAN GENOME SEQUENCING PROJECT IN THE REALM OF G8 NATIONS: A STUDY OF BRAZILIAN, CHINESE, AND INDIAN TECHNOLOGY
    3. PART II: RESEARCH ON GENOMICS IN TRADITIONAL AFRICAN HEALING AND STRATEGIES TO INTEGRATE TRADITIONAL HEALERS INTO WESTERN-TYPE HEALTH CARE SERVICES: A RETROSPECTIVE STUDY
    4. REFERENCES
  14. Chapter 7: Biotechnology and Wealth Creation from Plant with Healing Properties
    1. ABSTRACT
    2. DEFINITION OF BIOTECHNOLOGY
    3. ECOLOGICAL BIOMES IN WEST AFRICA
    4. CAUSES OF DEFORESTATION
    5. ECOLOGICAL IMPACT OF DEFORESTATION
    6. BIO-PROCESSING FOR MEDICINAL PLANTS
    7. ECOLOGICAL ADVANTAGES OF THE HERBAL PLANTS WITH HEALING PROPERTIES
    8. POTENTIAL ACCOMPLISHMENT OF TRADITIONAL HEALERS IN THE AGE OF GENOMICS
    9. WHO PARADIGM FOR TRADITIONAL MEDICINE IN PRIMARY HEALTH CARE
    10. W.H.O. PARADIGM FOR TRADITIONAL MEDICINE IN PRIMARY HEALTH CARE
    11. ROLE OF TRADITIONAL HEALERS IN THE AGE OF GENOMIC SCIENCE
    12. REFERENCES
  15. Chapter 8: Nutrigenomics and Nutrigenetics and the Medicinal Values of Vegetables and Fruits
    1. ABSTRACT
    2. INTRODUCTION
    3. NUTRITIONAL AND THERAPEUTIC BENEFITS OF VEGETABLES
    4. PHENOMENOLOGY, WOMEN, INFANTS, AND CHILDREN
    5. NUTRIENTS IN THE FOOD GROUPS
    6. SOURCES OF CARBOHYDRATES
    7. EFFECTS OF STARVATION IN ADULTS
    8. ROLE OF BIOFORTIFICATION
    9. REFERENCES
  16. Chapter 9: Genomic Technologies and the Emergence of BRICS (Brazil, Russia, India, China, and South Africa)
    1. ABSTRACT
    2. CHINA’S PREEMINENCE
    3. GENOMIC TECHNOLOGIES AND RESOURCES
    4. BGI
    5. WORKFORCE AND RESOURCES FOR ESTABLISHING A VIABLE GENOMICS RESEARCH CENTER
    6. GENOMICS IN THE REPUBLIC OF INDIA
    7. THE REPUBLIC OF SOUTH AFRICA
    8. REFERENCES
  17. Chapter 10: Genomics and Genetics in Cardiovascular Disease
    1. ABSTRACT
    2. FRAMINGHAM HEART STUDY: THE LEGACY FOR THE GENOMIC EPIDEMIOLOGY OF CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASES
    3. MODERN GENOME EPIDEMIOLOGY
    4. ACKNOWLEDGMENT
    5. REFERENCES
  18. Chapter 11: China's Philanthropic Gestures, Genomic Technologies, and the Imminent Setbacks in Developing Nations
    1. ABSTRACT
    2. PART I: INNOVATING GENOMIC TECHNOLOGIES IN DEVELOPING NATIONS
    3. CHINA’S ASSISTANCE TO DEVELOPING NATIONS
    4. PART II: TECHNOLOGICAL CHALLENGES IN ESTABLISHING GENOMIC CENTERS IN THE LEAST-DEVELOPING NATIONS IN SUB-SAHARAN AFRICA
    5. COLLABORATION
    6. HUMAN GENOME EPIDEMIOLOGIC CENTERS
    7. ACKNOWLEDGMENT
    8. REFERENCES
  19. Chapter 12: Wealth Creation from the Commercialization of Genomics Science
    1. ABSTRACT
    2. INTRODUCTION
    3. RELEVANCE OF DNA IDENTIFICATION TECHNOLOGY
    4. GENE THERAPY
    5. PHARMACOGENOMICS IN PERSONALIZED MEDICAL CARE
    6. MAJOR EPIDEMIOLOGICAL BENEFITS DERIVED FROM GENOMIC SCIENCE
    7. IMPACT OF COMMERCIALIZATION ON EMPLOYMENT CREATION FOR NATIONS
    8. ETHICAL, LEGAL, SOCIAL, AND FINANCIAL IMPLICATIONS OF GENOMICS RESEARCH AND COMMERCIALIZATION
    9. REFERENCES
  20. Chapter 13: Phenomenology, Epigenome and Epigenetic Influence on the Growth and Development of School-Age Children
    1. ABSTRACT
    2. THE ROLE OF EPIGENOME AND EPIGENETIC INFLUENCES ON THE HUMAN AGING PROCESS
    3. REFERENCES
  21. Chapter 14: The Global Genomics Research Initiatives and the H3Africa Project
    1. ABSTRACT
    2. PART I: THE IMPLEMENTATION OF THE H3AFRICA GENOMIC PROGRAM
    3. SYNOPSIS FOR POTENTIAL FUNDING SOURCES FOR A GENOMICS RESEARCH PROPOSAL
    4. PART II: WHO-CHAMPIONED PHC PROGRAMS COMPARED WITH GENOMICS
    5. COMPARABLE HUMAN GENOME SEQUENCING PROJECT
    6. REFERENCES
  22. Chapter 15: Microbial Genomics in the Developed and Developing Nations
    1. ABSTRACT
    2. PART I: THE ROLE OF MICROBIAL AGENTS IN GENOMIC SCIENCE
    3. BIOREMEDIATION
    4. MICROBES
    5. PART II: SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT AND THE CURRENT INEVITABILITY OF GLOBAL WARMING
    6. REFERENCES
  23. Chapter 16: Genetic Nomenclature and Quantitative Techniques for Modern Genome Epidemiologists, Clinicians, Educators and other Behavioral Scientists
    1. ABSTRACT
    2. PART I: GENETIC NOMENCLATURE IN GENOMIC SCIENCE
    3. PART II: SPECIFIC GENETIC DISEASES AND THE CHROMOSOMES INVOLVED
    4. CLINICAL FEATURES OF SOME CHROMOSOMAL DISORDERS
    5. REFERENCES
  24. Chapter 17: Crucial Role of Nursing Profession in the Era of Genomics Medicine
    1. ABSTRACT
    2. UNIQUE AND COMPREHENSIVE TRAINING OF NURSES
    3. GENOMIC NURSING SCIENCE BLUEPRINT
    4. REFERENCES
  25. Chapter 18: Role of Venture Capitalists, Industries and Start-Up Companies in Commercialization of Genomics Science
    1. ABSTRACT
    2. ROLE OF VENTURE CAPITALISTS, INDUSTRIES, AND START-UP COMPANIES IN COMMERCIALIZATION OF GENOMICS SCIENCE
    3. ACKNOWLEDGMENT
    4. REFERENCES
  26. About the Author