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Project Management

Book Description

The Guide to the Project Management Body of Knowledge published by the Project Management Institute provides a roadmap of 47 processes designed to support project managers in all phases of project management. The sheer number of processes and their allocation across process groups and knowledge areas may leave project managers in a quandary about where to start and how to apply the many components of project management processes. What is lacking is a simple explanatory guide for the layman that clarifies the “big picture” of the Project Management Body of Knowledge (PMBOK). This explains where a project manager should begin when managing projects, and how the project manager can easily make use of the PMBOK framework to progress from an initial idea to a project schedule.

Table of Contents

  1. Cover
  2. Half-title Page
  3. Title Page
  4. Copyright
  5. Dedication
  6. Contents
  7. List of Figures
  8. List of Tables
  9. List of Box
  10. I From the PMBOK Framework to Project Selection
    1. 1 Introduction to The PMBOK Framework
      1. 1.1 The PMI Framework: It Is All About Getting Work Done
      2. 1.2 Projects Versus Ongoing Operations
      3. 1.3 Digital Versus Analog
      4. 1.4 The Process Groups and What They Mean in Practice
      5. 1.5 The Five Process Groups
      6. 1.6 Beyond the Five Process Groups
      7. 1.7 Why Process Groups and Project Life Cycles Are Not the Same Thing
      8. 1.8 Knowledge Areas: A Content View of What Happens with Process Groups
      9. 1.9 Process Groups and Knowledge Areas—How Do They Go Together?
      10. 1.10 What’s Next to Think About? Complete the Plan
      11. 1.11 Do It! (The Executing Process Group)
      12. 1.12 Stay on Top of It! (The Monitoring and Controlling Process Group)
      13. 1.13 Finish It! (The Closing Process Group)
      14. 1.14 Seeing the “Big Picture”
      15. 1.15 The Five Process Groups
      16. 1.16 The Process Logic in the PMBOK
      17. 1.17 Chapter 1: Important “Takeaways” for the Project Manager
    2. 2 Project Selection
      1. 2.1 What Should Be Done? Deciding upon the Right Project
      2. 2.2 Strategy: Knowing “Why” Comes Before What
      3. 2.3 Strategic Alignment
      4. 2.4 How to Narrow Down Project Choices
      5. 2.5 Qualitative Selection Tools
      6. 2.6 Quantitative Selection Tools
      7. 2.7 Project Selection Questions and Analysis Techniques
      8. 2.8 The TVM: What Does It Mean?
      9. 2.9 How Is TVM Applied to the Payback Period Calculation?
      10. 2.10 Risk and Reward in Project Selection
      11. 2.11 Another View of Return—The Internal Rate of Return (IRR)
      12. 2.12 Returning to the Original Question…
      13. 2.13 Numbers Do Not Ensure Unbiased Results
      14. 2.14 Chapter 2: Important “Takeaways” for the Project Manager
  11. II Rom Project to Schedule
    1. 3 Getting Started: Estimates, Stakeholders, and Scope
      1. 3.1 Initial Project Estimates
      2. 3.2 The ROM Estimate
      3. 3.3 Starting a Plan with a Project Schedule
      4. 3.4 Start It! Getting Work Started with the Initiation Process Group
      5. 3.5 The Charter as Contract
      6. 3.6 Stakeholders: Who Are They, and Why Think About Them?
      7. 3.7 Analyzing Your Stakeholders
      8. 3.8 Scope, Time, and Cost in the Planning Process Group
      9. 3.9 Top Down Versus bottom Up
      10. 3.10 Applying Expertise
      11. 3.11 Using Analogies and Parametric Estimation
      12. 3.12 Estimating and Trade-Offs
      13. 3.13 Project Estimates and “the Learning Curve”
      14. 3.14 From High-Level Estimates
      15. 3.15 Project Scope-Getting Started
      16. 3.16 Planning to Plan: How to Approach Your Project Schedule
      17. 3.17 Describing Scope in Stages
      18. 3.18 The WBS: What’s the Point?
      19. 3.19 Scope = Deliverables
      20. 3.20 Chapter 3: Important “Takeways” for the Project Manager
    2. 4 How Long, and How Much?
      1. 4.1 Time: Activities and Deliverables
      2. 4.2 Putting Things in Order
      3. 4.3 From Simple, to Complex
      4. 4.4 Activity on Arrow: A Different Type of Network Diagram
      5. 4.5 Analyzing Project Duration Using a Network Diagram
      6. 4.6 The Forward Pass
      7. 4.7 Forward Pass with Merging Activities
      8. 4.8 The Backward Pass
      9. 4.9 Activity Slack
      10. 4.10 CPM and Sensitivity
      11. 4.11 Building the Estimated PERT Schedule
      12. 4.12 The PERT Network Diagram
      13. 4.13 The Weighted Average and the Project Average
      14. 4.14 The Normal Curve and Probability
      15. 4.15 Units of Project Time and Probability
      16. 4.16 Measuring Standard Deviations
      17. 4.17 Using the Z Table
      18. 4.18 Approximating Probabilities
      19. 4.19 The “50 Percent Rule”
      20. 4.20 Converting Schedule Time Units to Standard Deviations
      21. 4.21 The Significance of the Project Mean
      22. 4.22 Determining the Project Standard Deviation
      23. 4.23 Variance Calculations
      24. 4.24 Practical Use of PERT Analysis
      25. 4.25 An Additional Number to Remember
      26. 4.26 Recalling the PERT Analysis Sequence
      27. 4.27 PERT Versus Monte Carlo Analysis
      28. 4.28 The Schedule Duration and Resource Limitations
      29. 4.29 The Critical Chain
      30. 4.30 Further Conflicts and Additional Delays
      31. 4.31 Impact of Conflict Resolution
      32. 4.32 Schedule Optimization
      33. 4.33 Schedule Precedence Impact
      34. 4.34 Cost: What Funding Will Be Required to Complete the Project?
      35. 4.35 Categorizing Costs
      36. 4.36 Budget Plot (“S Curve or PV”)
      37. 4.37 From Budget to Gantt
      38. 4.38 Chapter 4: Important “Takeways” for the Project Manager
    3. 5 The Schedule is Not a Plan
      1. 5.1 Answering the Unanswered Questions
      2. 5.2 Final Thoughts on the PMBOK Framework
      3. 5.3 PMBOK 6 and Agile
      4. 5.4 Chapter 5: Important “Takeways” for the Project Manager
  12. Additional Reading
  13. About the Author
  14. Index
  15. Backcover