Cover by Maximiliano Firtman

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Chapter 16. Native and installed Webapps

Mobile web solutions can run like native installed applications on any platform. This technique is present today in every vendor’s roadmap, and many devices are already compatible with some kind of solution for this.

The mobile community hasn’t settled on a single name for this kind of application yet; some platforms call them “webapps” and others “offline applications,” “JavaScript applications,” “hybrid applications,” “native web applications,” “HTML5 apps,” or simply “widgets.”

All that said, to simplify our discussion of this kind of application in this chapter, from here on out I will refer to them as webapps when they are not packaged and native webapps when they are (the power of the author).

Note

On Chapter 3 we have already discussed about “native vs. web” battle and what it means for us.

We’ll define a mobile webapp as an application entirely developed using web technologies (HTML, CSS, JavaScript) that is installed on the device’s home screen or in the applications menu and that the user can use when offline as well as online. The usage of web technologies is invisible to the user, and the application can work just like any other software installed on the device.

One of the main features of a webapp against hybrids or native webapps is the hosted-based nature: webapps require to be hosted on a web server and native webapps or hybrids are packaged, signed and distributed through an app store.

Pros and Cons

Webapps are the future for most ...

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