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Programming the Mobile Web

Cover of Programming the Mobile Web by Maximiliano Firtman Published by O'Reilly Media, Inc.
  1. Programming the Mobile Web
    1. SPECIAL OFFER: Upgrade this ebook with O’Reilly
    2. Preface
      1. Who This Book Is For
      2. Who This Book Is Not For
      3. What You’ll Learn
      4. Other Options
      5. If You Like (or Don’t Like) This Book
      6. Conventions Used in This Book
      7. Using Code Examples
      8. How to Contact Us
      9. Safari® Books Online
      10. Acknowledgments
    3. 1. The Mobile Jungle
      1. Myths of the Mobile Web
      2. The Mobile Ecosystem
      3. Mobile Knowledge
      4. Brands, Models, and Platforms
      5. Technical Information
      6. Market Statistics
    4. 2. Mobile Browsing
      1. The Mobile Browsing Experience
      2. Mobile Web Eras
    5. 3. Architecture and Design
      1. Website Architecture
      2. Design and Usability
    6. 4. Setting Up Your Environment
      1. Setting Up a Development Environment
      2. Production Environment
    7. 5. Markups and Standards
      1. First, the Old Ones
      2. Current Standards
      3. XHTML Mobile Profile and Basic
      4. CSS for Mobile
      5. Confusion
    8. 6. Coding Markup
      1. Heading Structure
      2. The Document Body
      3. Plug-ins and Extensions
    9. 7. CSS for Mobile Browsers
      1. Where to Insert the CSS
      2. Selectors
      3. CSS Techniques
      4. Common Patterns
      5. CSS Sprites
      6. WebKit Extensions
    10. 8. JavaScript Mobile
      1. Supported Technologies
      2. Coding JavaScript for Mobile Browsers
    11. 9. Ajax, RIA, and HTML 5
      1. Ajax Support
      2. JavaScript Libraries
      3. WebKit CSS Extensions
      4. Mobile Rich Internet Applications
      5. HTML 5
    12. 10. Server-Side Browser Detection and Content Delivery
      1. Mobile Detection
      2. Content Delivery
      3. Multimedia and Streaming
      4. Content Adaptation
      5. Mobilizing WordPress and Other CMSs
    13. 11. Geolocation and Maps
      1. Location Techniques
      2. Detecting the Location
      3. Showing a Map
    14. 12. Widgets and Offline Webapps
      1. Mobile Widget Platforms
      2. Standards
      3. Platforms
      4. Widget Design Patterns
    15. 13. Testing, Debugging, and Performance
      1. Testing and Debugging
      2. Performance Optimization
    16. 14. Distribution and Social Web 2.0
      1. Mobile SEO
      2. Mobile Web Statistics
      3. Mobile Web Advertising
      4. Mobile Web Social Features
    17. A. MIME Types for Mobile Content
      1. Markup and Script MIME Types
      2. Image MIME Types
      3. Mobile Content MIME Types
      4. Audio and Video MIME Types
      5. Widget and Webapp MIME Types
    18. Index
    19. About the Author
    20. Colophon
    21. SPECIAL OFFER: Upgrade this ebook with O’Reilly
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Market Statistics

At this point, you may be tempted to close this book and leave the mobile jungle via a shortcut. However, believe me, the path through the jungle is clearer than you probably think right now.

Let’s analyze some market share information. This will help us to make some decisions about how our work will be done.

Sometimes it’s difficult to decide what to target. Should we develop for all devices, or only for the iPhone and Android devices? How can we decide how many versions to create?

The mobile world is very different from the desktop world. If we are developing for desktops, we can assume that the market share of the available browsers will be similar worldwide. In the mobile world, this is not the case. Because of commercial agreements and cultural differences, we find very diverse market shares in different regions of the world (U.S. & Canada, Latin America, Europe, Asia, Oceania). For example, Nokia has a huge market share in Europe and Asia, but not in the United States. That’s why we need to define who our targets are. Worldwide users? U.S. users? What about gender and age? Depending on the target demographic, we can define our porting strategy.

Overall mobile device sales statistics aren’t the only ones we need to analyze. The market shares are very different if we look only at people using their mobile devices to browse the Web. A device with a very low total worldwide market share, such as the iPhone, can prove to have a big market share if we only analyze devices with high web consumption. Figures 1-14 through 1-16 show a few different counts with varying results.

Gartner offers frequently updated statistics about mobile terminal (all devices) and smartphone sales. Nokia is the global leader in both segments.

Figure 1-14. Gartner offers frequently updated statistics about mobile terminal (all devices) and smartphone sales. Nokia is the global leader in both segments.

At we can find mobile browser statistics (global and by region) collected from websites using the StatCounter tool. The iPod Touch is registered as iTouch, so iPhone OS devices are leading here.

Figure 1-15. At http://gs.statcounter.com we can find mobile browser statistics (global and by region) collected from websites using the StatCounter tool. The iPod Touch is registered as iTouch, so iPhone OS devices are leading here.

AdMob is an advertisement network for mobile websites and applications. It offers public statistics at .

Figure 1-16. AdMob is an advertisement network for mobile websites and applications. It offers public statistics at http://metrics.admob.com.

Note

Some statistics services use JavaScript code or some other technique that is not available for microbrowsers or low-end devices, so they are generally left out of the list of devices visiting your website. You need to be very careful about interpreting statistics.

GetJar.com is an application store for freeware and shareware applications, mainly developed in Java ME but with other platforms supported, too. The site offers public statistics about the market share of its visitors, as shown in Table 1-2. This information is very useful, because the visitors are active—they are browsing a website looking for applications to download—so we can consider them active mobile Internet users in the Java ME–compatible market.

Table 1-2. Global GetJar market share statistics by manufacturer (September 2009)

Manufacturer

Market share

Nokia

47.8%

Sony Ericsson

16.6%

Samsung

7.8%

LG

3.2%

BlackBerry

3%

Motorola

2.29%

Warning

While GetJar statistics are very useful, we need to understand that the market share of iPhone, Android, Windows Mobile, and webOS devices are not represented accurately because their users don’t typically use GetJar.

The well-known research firm Gartner predicts the 2012 smartphone market share as shown in Table 1-3 and Figure 1-17, with Symbian still at the head, followed by Android and iPhone. The prediction indicates a small reduction for Symbian but a positive future for Android and Windows Mobile, with both increasing their market share.

Table 1-3. Gartner’s prediction for 2012 smartphone market share

Smartphone platform/manufacturer

2012 predicted market share

Symbian

39%

Android

14.5%

iPhone

13.7%

Windows Mobile

12.8%

BlackBerry

12.5%

Linux

5.4%

webOS

2.1%

Gartner predicts that in 2012 Android will have more market share than iPhone, BlackBerry, and Windows Mobile. Symbian will continue its worldwide leadership.

Figure 1-17. Gartner predicts that in 2012 Android will have more market share than iPhone, BlackBerry, and Windows Mobile. Symbian will continue its worldwide leadership.

Figure 1-18 shows another way of exploring localized device statistics. Remember that these statistics depend on the source and can change a lot over time.

A nice updated mobile browser market share graphic based on StatCounter data is available at .

Figure 1-18. A nice updated mobile browser market share graphic based on StatCounter data is available at http://www.icrossing.co.uk.

Note

You can find a list of updated mobile browser and device market share statistics in the statistics section of this book’s blog, at http://www.mobilexweb.com/go/stats.

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