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Programming Reactive Streams with RxJava

Video Description

Reactive and asynchronous applications are growing in popularity, but what is the best way to build them? This course, designed for software architects and intermediate- to advanced-level Java programmers, teaches you how to apply the latest concurrency techniques to develop state of the art Java applications. With the rise of microservices and service oriented architectures (SOAs), asynchronous concurrency is now critical in day-to-day Java development. This course builds upon theory offered in the associated "Asynchronous Programming in Java" course by refactoring several Java projects using RxJava. It explains the concepts behind this popular library, shows how RxJava compares with other concurrency concepts, and illustrates how to use the library productively in practice.

  • Understand how to program event-driven reactive code using the RxJava library
  • Learn to implement reactive code in a readable and maintainable way using RxJava
  • Gain experience building reliable and performant Java apps in a microservices/SOA model

Richard Warburton is a software engineer, teacher, and Java Champion. He’s worked as a developer in such diverse areas as low latency trading systems, statistical analytics, static analysis, compilers, and network protocols. Author of Java 8 Lambdas (O'Reilly Media), Richard holds a PhD in Computer Science from The University of Warwick.

Raoul-Gabriel Urma is CEO of Cambridge Spark, a learning community for data scientists and developers in the UK. Co-author of Java 8 in Action (Manning Publications), Raoul has delivered over 100 technical talks at international conferences. He's worked for Google, eBay, Oracle, and Goldman Sachs, and holds a PhD in Computer Science from the University of Cambridge.