You are previewing Programming F# 3.0, 2nd Edition.

Programming F# 3.0, 2nd Edition

Cover of Programming F# 3.0, 2nd Edition by Chris Smith Published by O'Reilly Media, Inc.
  1. Programming F# 3.0
  2. Preface
    1. Introducing F#
    2. Who This Book Is For
    3. What You Need to Get Going
    4. How the Book Is Organized
      1. Part I
      2. Part II
      3. Part III
    5. Part IV
    6. Conventions Used in This Book
    7. Using Code Examples
    8. Safari® Books Online
    9. I’d Like to Hear from You
    10. Acknowledgments
  3. I. Multiparadigm Programming
    1. 1. Introduction to F#
      1. Getting to Know F#
      2. Visual Studio 11
      3. F# Interactive
      4. Managing F# Source Files
    2. 2. Fundamentals
      1. Primitive Types
      2. Comparison and Equality
      3. Functions
      4. Core Types
      5. Organizing F# Code
    3. 3. Functional Programming
      1. Understanding Functions
      2. Pattern Matching
      3. Discriminated Unions
      4. Records
      5. Lazy Evaluation
      6. Sequences
      7. Queries
    4. 4. Imperative Programming
      1. Understanding Memory in .NET
      2. Changing Values
      3. Units of Measure
      4. Arrays
      5. Mutable Collection Types
      6. Looping Constructs
      7. Exceptions
    5. 5. Object-Oriented Programming
      1. Programming with Objects
      2. Understanding System.Object
      3. Understanding Classes
      4. Methods and Properties
      5. Inheritance
    6. 6. .NET Programming
      1. The .NET Platform
      2. Interfaces
      3. Object Expressions
      4. Extension Methods
      5. Extending Modules
      6. Enumerations
      7. Structs
  4. II. Programming F#
    1. 7. Applied Functional Programming
      1. Active Patterns
      2. Using Modules
      3. Mastering Lists
      4. Tail Recursion
      5. Programming with Functions
      6. Functional Patterns
      7. Functional Data Structures
    2. 8. Applied Object-Oriented Programming
      1. Operators
      2. Generic Type Constraints
      3. Delegates and Events
      4. Events
    3. 9. Asynchronous and Parallel Programming
      1. Working with Threads
      2. Asynchronous Programming
      3. Asynchronous Workflows
      4. Parallel Programming
      5. Task Parallel Library
    4. 10. Scripting
      1. F# Script Files
      2. Directives
      3. F# Script Recipes
    5. 11. Data Processing
      1. Indexing
      2. Querying
  5. III. Extending the F# Language
    1. 12. Reflection
      1. Attributes
      2. Type Reflection
      3. Dynamic Instantiation
      4. Using Reflection
    2. 13. Computation Expressions
      1. Toward Computation Expressions
      2. Computation Expression Builders
      3. Custom Computation Expression Builders
    3. 14. Quotations
      1. Quotation Basics
      2. Generating Quotation Expressions
    4. 15. Type Providers
      1. Typed Data Versus Typed Languages
      2. Type Providers
  6. IV. Appendixes
    1. A. Overview of .NET Libraries
      1. Visualization
      2. Data Processing
      3. Storing Data
    2. B. F# Interop
      1. .NET Interop
      2. Unmanaged Interop
  7. Index
  8. About the Author
  9. Colophon
  10. Copyright
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Chapter 8. Applied Object-Oriented Programming

This chapter could also be called “being functional in an object-oriented world.” By now you’ve mastered the F# syntax and style, but there is still plenty to be said about using F# in the object-oriented landscape of the .NET platform.

In this chapter, you learn how to create F# types that integrate better with other object-oriented languages like C#. For example, with operator overloading, you can allow your types to be used with symbolic code. Also, events enable your classes to notify consumers to receive notifications when certain actions occur. This not only enables you to be more expressive in your F# code, but also reduces the friction with non-F# developers when sharing your code.

Operators

A symbolic notation for manipulating objects can simplify your code by eliminating methods like Add and Remove, and instead using more intuitive counterparts like + and -. Also, if an object represents a collection of data, being able to index directly into it with the .[ ] or .[expr .. expr] notation can make it much easier to access the data an object holds.

Operator Overloading

Operator overloading is a term used for adding new meaning to an existing operator, like + or -. Instead of only working on primitive types, you can overload those operators to accept custom types you create. Operator overloading in F# can be done by simply adding a static method to a type. After that, you can use the operator as if it natively supported the type. The ...

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