You are previewing Programming F# 3.0, 2nd Edition.

Programming F# 3.0, 2nd Edition

Cover of Programming F# 3.0, 2nd Edition by Chris Smith Published by O'Reilly Media, Inc.
  1. Programming F# 3.0
  2. Preface
    1. Introducing F#
    2. Who This Book Is For
    3. What You Need to Get Going
    4. How the Book Is Organized
      1. Part I
      2. Part II
      3. Part III
    5. Part IV
    6. Conventions Used in This Book
    7. Using Code Examples
    8. Safari® Books Online
    9. I’d Like to Hear from You
    10. Acknowledgments
  3. I. Multiparadigm Programming
    1. 1. Introduction to F#
      1. Getting to Know F#
      2. Visual Studio 11
      3. F# Interactive
      4. Managing F# Source Files
    2. 2. Fundamentals
      1. Primitive Types
      2. Comparison and Equality
      3. Functions
      4. Core Types
      5. Organizing F# Code
    3. 3. Functional Programming
      1. Understanding Functions
      2. Pattern Matching
      3. Discriminated Unions
      4. Records
      5. Lazy Evaluation
      6. Sequences
      7. Queries
    4. 4. Imperative Programming
      1. Understanding Memory in .NET
      2. Changing Values
      3. Units of Measure
      4. Arrays
      5. Mutable Collection Types
      6. Looping Constructs
      7. Exceptions
    5. 5. Object-Oriented Programming
      1. Programming with Objects
      2. Understanding System.Object
      3. Understanding Classes
      4. Methods and Properties
      5. Inheritance
    6. 6. .NET Programming
      1. The .NET Platform
      2. Interfaces
      3. Object Expressions
      4. Extension Methods
      5. Extending Modules
      6. Enumerations
      7. Structs
  4. II. Programming F#
    1. 7. Applied Functional Programming
      1. Active Patterns
      2. Using Modules
      3. Mastering Lists
      4. Tail Recursion
      5. Programming with Functions
      6. Functional Patterns
      7. Functional Data Structures
    2. 8. Applied Object-Oriented Programming
      1. Operators
      2. Generic Type Constraints
      3. Delegates and Events
      4. Events
    3. 9. Asynchronous and Parallel Programming
      1. Working with Threads
      2. Asynchronous Programming
      3. Asynchronous Workflows
      4. Parallel Programming
      5. Task Parallel Library
    4. 10. Scripting
      1. F# Script Files
      2. Directives
      3. F# Script Recipes
    5. 11. Data Processing
      1. Indexing
      2. Querying
  5. III. Extending the F# Language
    1. 12. Reflection
      1. Attributes
      2. Type Reflection
      3. Dynamic Instantiation
      4. Using Reflection
    2. 13. Computation Expressions
      1. Toward Computation Expressions
      2. Computation Expression Builders
      3. Custom Computation Expression Builders
    3. 14. Quotations
      1. Quotation Basics
      2. Generating Quotation Expressions
    4. 15. Type Providers
      1. Typed Data Versus Typed Languages
      2. Type Providers
  6. IV. Appendixes
    1. A. Overview of .NET Libraries
      1. Visualization
      2. Data Processing
      3. Storing Data
    2. B. F# Interop
      1. .NET Interop
      2. Unmanaged Interop
  7. Index
  8. About the Author
  9. Colophon
  10. Copyright

Appendix A. Overview of .NET Libraries

The .NET ecosystem has incredible breadth—by enabling you to run .NET code on various platforms, like on your phone, the X-Box gaming system, or even on the Internet via Silverlight. It also has incredible depth—by providing a wealth of powerful libraries from visualization, to communications, to databases, and so on.

This appendix provides a quick overview of some existing .NET libraries that can help you transition from the sample applications in this book to real-world problem solving. The APIs covered are divided into three main areas: visualization, data processing, and storing data.


F# is a great tool for processing raw data, but visualizing that data doesn’t need to be constrained to just the command line.

There are two main visualization APIs available for .NET: Windows Forms (WinForms) and Windows Presentation Foundation (WPF). WinForms is the older of the two and is an object-oriented wrapper on top of core Windows APIs. With WinForms, it is easy to create a functioning UI with buttons and common controls, but it can be difficult to create a rich and dynamic interface. WPF, on the other hand, is a much more design-centric library that allows for sophisticated interfaces at the cost of added complexity and a steeper learning curve.


F# doesn’t support code generation, so you cannot use the WYSIWYG editors of Visual Studio. The examples you see in this chapter build UIs programmatically; however, it is recommended that ...

The best content for your career. Discover unlimited learning on demand for around $1/day.