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Professional Storyboarding

Book Description

Storyboarding is a very tough business, and a new storyboarder really needs to have their wits about them and have professional savvy to survive in this competitive field. Storyboarding: Rules of Thumb offers highly illustrative examples of basic storyboarding concepts, as well as sound, career-oriented advice for the new artist. This book also features a number of veteran storyboard artists sharing their experiences in the professional world.

Table of Contents

  1. Front Cover
  2. Half Title
  3. Title Page
  4. Copyright
  5. Contents
  6. Author Biographies
  7. Acknowledgments
  8. Introduction
    1. Achieving Success
  9. 1. Overview
    1. The History of Storyboards
    2. Early Storyboards
    3. Storyboards from the Disney Studio
      1. Plane Crazy (1928)
    4. Who Hires Storyboard Artists?
      1. Independent Contractors vs Staffers
      2. Staffers
      3. Independent Contractors (aka Freelancers)
  10. 2. Visual Literacy
    1. Screen Reference
    2. The Story Point
    3. Emotional Response
    4. Visual Appeal
    5. Composition within Your Picture Frame
    6. Working with Shapes
      1. Lines
      2. The Rule of Thirds
      3. Design of the Shapes
    7. Focal Point
    8. Depth
      1. Perspective
      2. Contrast
      3. Foreground, Middle Ground, and Background
      4. Overlapping Forms
      5. Change in Size
  11. 3. Drawing for Storyboards
    1. Your Drawing Alphabet: SICO Shapes
      1. S-Curves
      2. Straight Lines
      3. C-Curves
      4. Ellipses
      5. Compound Shapes
    2. The Art of the Rough
    3. Drawing Shortcuts
      1. Simplify
      2. Characters
      3. Star People
      4. Poses
      5. Hands
      6. Heads
      7. Eyes 54
  12. 4. Cinema Language
    1. Aspect Ratios
      1. 1.33:1
      2. 1.66:1
      3. 1.78:1
      4. 1.85:1
      5. 2.35:1
    2. Shot Choice
      1. Extreme Wide Shot (EWS)
      2. Wide Shot (WS)
      3. Full Shot (FS)
      4. Cowboy Shot
      5. Medium Shot (MS)
      6. Close Up Shot (CU)
      7. Choker Shot
      8. Extreme Close Up (ECU)
      9. Over the Shoulder Shot (OTS)
      10. Point of View Shot (POV)
      11. Reverse Shot
      12. Reaction Shot
      13. Insert Shot
    3. Camera Position and Height
    4. Camera Position Affects Emotion
      1. Eye Line
      2. Pivoting Motions of the Camera: Panning and Tilting
      3. Moving Camera Shots
      4. Other Specialized Shots
    5. Camera Lenses
      1. Long Lens (Narrow-angle Lens)
      2. Short Lens (Wide-angle Lens)
      3. Fisheye Lens
      4. Zoom In/Zoom Out
      5. Rack Focus
    6. Drawing Different Camera Lenses
      1. Drawing a Long Lens (40–120 mm)
      2. Drawing a Short-angle Lens (18–40 mm)
    7. Screen Direction
    8. The 180° Rule
      1. 180° Rule with Three Characters
      2. Breaking the 180° Rule
      3. Case Example
  13. 5. Story Structure
    1. What Is a Story?
      1. Story
      2. Protagonist
      3. Motivation
      4. Conflict
      5. Antagonist
      6. Inciting Incident
      7. Plot
      8. Climax
      9. Resolution
    2. Story Charts
    3. Incorporating Design in Your Scenes
    4. Rhythm
    5. Choice
  14. 6. Emotion
    1. Juxtaposition of Shots
  15. 7. Staging
    1. Secondary Action
    2. Use Depth to Support Your Staging
  16. 8. Storyboard Types
    1. Beat Boards
    2. Continuity Boards/Shooting Boards
    3. Live Action Boards
    4. Feature Animation Boards
    5. Advertising Storyboards/Pitch Boards
    6. TV Animation Boards
    7. Video Game Storyboards
    8. Previs
  17. 9. Storyboarding
    1. The Storyboard Process
      1. Script Analysis
    2. Fulfilling the Story Point
    3. Subtext
    4. Thumbnails
      1. Starting Your Rough
      2. Double Check Your Work
    5. Finished Storyboards
      1. Digital Storyboards
    6. Checklist for Identifying Common Mistakes
  18. 10. Advanced Storyboard Techniques
    1. Creating Efficiency
      1. Complex Camera Moves
    2. Transitions
      1. Visual Transitions
      2. Story Point Transitions
      3. Audio Transitions
      4. Effects Tansitions
    3. Cutting Styles
    4. Creative Dialogue
    5. Creative Screen Direction
    6. Awesome Action Scenes
    7. Winning Animatics
      1. Creating the Illusion of Parallax
  19. 11. Portfolios and Promotion
    1. Portfolio Design
      1. What to Avoid
    2. Résumé Basics
  20. 12. Finding Work
    1. Online Presence
    2. Starting the Search
    3. Networking
    4. Union vs Non-union
      1. IATSE Local 800
    5. What’s Your Rate?
    6. Interviews
    7. Freelance Work
    8. Got the Job—Now What?
  21. 13. Spotlight: The Professional Storyboard Artist
    1. Interview with Benton Jew
    2. Interview with Jeff Zugale
    3. Interview with Josh Sheppard
    4. Interview with Sherm Cohen, Storyboard Supervisor at Disney Television Animation
    5. More Tips
  22. 14. Parting Thoughts
  23. Resources
  24. Filmography
  25. Index