You are previewing Professional: JavaScript® for Web Developers, Third Edition.

Professional: JavaScript® for Web Developers, Third Edition

  1. Cover
  2. Contents
  3. Introduction
  4. Chapter 1: What is Javascript?
    1. A Short History
    2. JavaScript Implementations
    3. JavaScript Versions
    4. Summary
  5. Chapter 2: Javascript in Html
    1. The <script> Element
    2. Inline Code versus External Files
    3. Document Modes
    4. The <noscript> Element
    5. Summary
  6. Chapter 3: Language Basics
    1. Syntax
    2. Keywords and Reserved Words
    3. Variables
    4. Data Types
    5. Operators
    6. Statements
    7. Functions
    8. Summary
  7. Chapter 4: Variables, Scope, and Memory
    1. Primitive and Reference Values
    2. Execution Context and Scope
    3. Garbage Collection
    4. Summary
  8. Chapter 5: Reference Types
    1. The Object Type
    2. The Array Type
    3. The Date Type
    4. The RegExp Type
    5. The Function Type
    6. Primitive Wrapper Types
    7. Singleton Built-in Objects
    8. Summary
  9. Chapter 6: Object-Oriented Programming
    1. Understanding Objects
    2. Object Creation
    3. Inheritance
    4. Summary
  10. Chapter 7: Function Expressions
    1. Recursion
    2. Closures
    3. Mimicking Block Scope
    4. Private Variables
    5. Summary
  11. Chapter 8: The Browser Object Model
    1. The window Object
    2. The location Object
    3. The Navigator Object
    4. The screen Object
    5. The history Object
    6. Summary
  12. Chapter 9: Client Detection
    1. Capability Detection
    2. Quirks Detection
    3. User-Agent Detection
    4. Summary
  13. Chapter 10: The Document Object Model
    1. Hierarchy of Nodes
    2. Working with the DOM
    3. Summary
  14. Chapter 11: Dom Extensions
    1. Selectors API
    2. Element Traversal
    3. HTML5
    4. Proprietary Extensions
    5. Summary
  15. Chapter 12: Dom Levels 2 and 3
    1. DOM Changes
    2. Styles
    3. Traversals
    4. Ranges
    5. Summary
  16. Chapter 13: Events
    1. Event Flow
    2. Event Handlers
    3. The Event Object
    4. Event Types
    5. Memory and Performance
    6. Simulating Events
    7. Summary
  17. Chapter 14: Scripting Forms
    1. Form Basics
    2. Scripting Text Boxes
    3. Scripting Select Boxes
    4. Form Serialization
    5. Rich Text Editing
    6. Summary
  18. Chapter 15: Graphics With Canvas
    1. Basic Usage
    2. The 2D Context
    3. WebGL
    4. Summary
  19. Chapter 16: Html5 Scripting
    1. Cross-Document Messaging
    2. Native Drag and Drop
    3. Media Elements
    4. History State Management
    5. Summary
  20. Chapter 17: Error Handling and Debugging
    1. Browser Error Reporting
    2. Error Handling
    3. Debugging Techniques
    4. Common Internet Explorer Errors
    5. Summary
  21. Chapter 18: Xml in Javascript
    1. XML DOM Support in Browsers
    2. XPath Support in Browsers
    3. XSLT Support in Browsers
    4. Summary
  22. Chapter 19: Ecmascript For Xml
    1. E4X Types
    2. General Usage
    3. Other Changes
    4. Enabling Full E4X
    5. Summary
  23. Chapter 20: JSON
    1. Syntax
    2. Parsing and Serialization
    3. Summary
  24. Chapter 21: Ajax and Comet
    1. The XMLHttpRequest Object
    2. XMLHttpRequest Level 2
    3. Progress Events
    4. Cross-Origin Resource Sharing
    5. Alternate Cross-Domain Techniques
    6. Security
    7. Summary
  25. Chapter 22: Advanced Techniques
    1. Advanced Functions
    2. Tamper-Proof Objects
    3. Advanced Timers
    4. Custom Events
    5. Drag and Drop
    6. Summary
  26. Chapter 23: Offline Applications and Client-Side Storage
    1. Offline Detection
    2. Application Cache
    3. Data Storage
    4. Summary
  27. Chapter 24: Best Practices
    1. Maintainability
    2. Performance
    3. Deployment
    4. Summary
  28. Chapter 25: Emerging APIS
    1. RequestAnimationFrame()
    2. Page Visibility API
    3. Geolocation API
    4. File API
    5. Web Timing
    6. Web Workers
    7. Summary
  29. Appendix A: Ecmascript Harmony
  30. Appendix B: Strict Mode
  31. Appendix C: Javascript Libraries
  32. Appendix D: Javascript TOOLS
O'Reilly logo

Chapter 17

Error Handling and Debugging

WHAT’S IN THIS CHAPTER?

  • Understanding browser error reporting
  • Handling errors
  • Debugging JavaScript code

JavaScript has traditionally been known as one of the most difficult programming languages to debug because of its dynamic nature and years without proper development tools. Errors typically resulted in confusing browser messages such as "object expected" that provided little or no contextual information. The third edition of ECMAScript aimed to improve this situation, introducing the try-catch and throw statements, along with various error types to help developers deal with errors when they occur. A few years later, JavaScript debuggers and debugging tools began appearing for web browsers. By 2008, most web browsers supported some JavaScript debugging capabilities.

Armed with the proper language support and development tools, web developers are now empowered to implement proper error-handling processes and figure out the cause of problems.

BROWSER ERROR REPORTING

All of the major web browsers — Internet Explorer, Firefox, Safari, Chrome, and Opera — have some way to report JavaScript errors to the user. By default, all browsers hide this information, because it’s of little use to anyone but the developer. When developing browser-based JavaScript solutions, be sure to enable JavaScript error reporting to be notified when there is an error.

Internet Explorer

Internet Explorer is the only browser that displays a JavaScript error indicator ...

The best content for your career. Discover unlimited learning on demand for around $1/day.