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Professional ASP.NET 3.5 AJAX by Matt Gibbs, Dan Wahlin, Bill Evjen, Dave Reed

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2.2. ASP.NET AJAX Applications

The next step is to build a basic sample utilizing this new framework. First, create a new ASP.NET Web Site application using the New Web Site dialog. Name the project AjaxWebSite. You will notice (as shown here in Figure 2-3) that there is not a separate type of ASP.NET project for building an ASP.NET AJAX application because every ASP.NET application that you now build is AJAX-enabled.

After you create the application, you will be presented with what is now a standard Web site project. However, you may notice some additional settings in the web.config file that are new to ASP.NET 3.5. At the top of the web.config file, there are new configuration sections that are registered that deal with AJAX. This section of web.config is presented in Listing 2-1.

Figure 2-3. Figure 2-3
Example 2-1. The <configSections> element for an ASP.NET 3.5 application
<?xml version="1.0"?> <configuration> <configSections> <sectionGroup name="system.web.extensions" type="System.Web.Configuration.SystemWebExtensionsSectionGroup, System.Web.Extensions, Version=3.5.0.0, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=31BF3856AD364E35"> <sectionGroup name="scripting" type="System.Web.Configuration.ScriptingSectionGroup, System.Web.Extensions, Version=3.5.0.0, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=31BF3856AD364E35"> <section name="scriptResourceHandler" type="System.Web.Configuration.ScriptingScriptResourceHandlerSection, ...

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