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Process Modeling Style

Book Description

Process Modeling Style focuses on other aspects of process modeling beyond notation that are very important to practitioners. Many people who model processes focus on the specific notation used to create their drawings. While that is important, there are many other aspects to modeling, such as naming, creating identifiers, descriptions, interfaces, patterns, and creating useful process documentation. Experience author John Long focuses on those non-notational aspects of modeling, which practitioners will find invaluable.



  • Gives solid advice for creating roles, work products, and processes
  • Instucts on how to organize and structure the parts of a process
  • Gives examples of documents you should use to define a set of processes

Table of Contents

  1. Cover image
  2. Title page
  3. Copyright
  4. Dedication and Thanks
  5. Author’s Information
  6. Abstract
  7. Introduction
    1. I.1 Why a Style Book on Process Modeling?
    2. I.2 A Lot of People Just Are Not “Process People”
    3. I.3 The Need for Style
    4. I.4 The Need for Accuracy and Detail
    5. I.5 Toward a Process Architecture
    6. I.6 What This Book Is Not
    7. I.7 In Summary
  8. Chapter 1. Eight of the Biggest Process Modeling Problems
    1. 1.1 Not Focusing on the Diagrams
    2. 1.2 Only Focusing on the Workflow Diagrams
    3. 1.3 Ignoring the Process Architecture
    4. 1.4 Ignoring Process Interfaces
    5. 1.5 Inconsistent or Nonstandard Notation
    6. 1.6 Making Overly Complicated Workflows
    7. 1.7 Focusing on Jobs, Not Roles
    8. 1.8 Fuzzy Work Products
  9. Chapter 2. Selecting a Notation
    1. 2.1 The Right Notation for You
    2. 2.2 Flowcharts
    3. 2.3 Business Process Modeling Notation
    4. 2.4 Line of Visibility Enterprise Modeling
    5. 2.5 Use Cases
    6. 2.6 UML
    7. 2.7 IDEF0
  10. Chapter 3. Process Modeling Goals
    1. 3.1 Purpose
    2. 3.2 Scope
    3. 3.3 Depth
    4. 3.4 Degree of Automation
  11. Chapter 4. Defining Processes and Process Elements
    1. 4.1 Process
    2. 4.2 Activity
    3. 4.3 Task
    4. 4.4 Procedure
    5. 4.5 Role
    6. 4.6 Work Product
  12. Chapter 5. Process Structure
    1. 5.1 Workflow Decomposition
    2. 5.2 The Components of a Workflow Diagram
    3. 5.3 The Value of Swim Lanes
    4. 5.4 Horizontal Versus Vertical Workflows
    5. 5.5 Grouping Processes
    6. 5.6 Elemental Processes
    7. 5.7 Scenarios
    8. 5.8 Workflow Patterns
  13. Chapter 6. How to Fix a Bad Workflow
    1. 6.1 Uncoil Snaky Workflows
    2. 6.2 Unravel Confusing Logic
    3. 6.3 Use Consistent Notation
    4. 6.4 Use Consistent Naming
  14. Chapter 7. Naming Conventions
    1. 7.1 Use a Consistent Naming Style
    2. 7.2 All Names Should Be Unique
    3. 7.3 Use Verbs and Nouns in a Consistent Way
    4. 7.4 Naming Processes
    5. 7.5 Naming Activities and Tasks
    6. 7.6 Naming Work Products
    7. 7.7 Naming Roles
  15. Chapter 8. Identifier Conventions
    1. 8.1 What is an Identifier (ID)?
    2. 8.2 Why Identifiers are Important
    3. 8.3 Work Product Identifiers
    4. 8.4 Role Identifiers
  16. Chapter 9. Workflow Connections and Relationships
    1. 9.1 Workflow Connections
    2. 9.2 Connections to or from Other Workflows
    3. 9.3 Connections Within the Same Workflow
    4. 9.4 Connections to or from Start and Stop Nodes
    5. 9.5 Process Relationships
    6. 9.6 Work Products
    7. 9.7 Artifacts
    8. 9.8 Deliverables
    9. 9.9 Inputs, Outputs, and Controls
    10. 9.10 Container Work Products
  17. Chapter 10. Roles
    1. 10.1 What Roles Are
    2. 10.2 What Roles Are Not
    3. 10.3 Role Relationships with Work Products
    4. 10.4 Role Involvement with Processes
  18. Chapter 11. Useful Process Documents
    1. 11.1 Process Catalog
    2. 11.2 Role Catalog
    3. 11.3 Work Product Catalog
    4. 11.4 Process Interface Matrix
    5. 11.5 Work Product Participation Matrix
  19. Chapter 12. Tools
    1. 12.1 Drawing Tools
    2. 12.2 Modeling Tools
    3. 12.3 Simulation Tools
    4. 12.4 Publishing Tools
    5. 12.5 Reviewing Tools
    6. 12.6 Execution Tools
  20. Chapter 13. Conclusion: Which Style Elements Are Right for Your Team?
  21. Appendix. Using Process Standards
    1. A.1 ISO 9001
    2. A.2 ISO 33000 and ISO IEC 15504