O'Reilly logo

PROC SQL: Beyond the Basics Using SAS® by Kirk Paul Lafler

Stay ahead with the world's most comprehensive technology and business learning platform.

With Safari, you learn the way you learn best. Get unlimited access to videos, live online training, learning paths, books, tutorials, and more.

Start Free Trial

No credit card required

5.3. Populating Tables

After a table is created, it can then be populated with data. Unless the newly created table is defined as a subset of an existing table or its content is to remain static, one or more rows of data may eventually need to be added. The SQL standard provides the INSERT INTO statement as the vehicle for adding rows of data. The examples in this section look at how to add data in all the columns in a row as well as how to add data in only some of the columns in a row.

5.3.1. Adding Data to All the Columns in a Row

You populate tables with data by using an INSERT INTO statement. In fact, the INSERT INTO statement really doesn’t insert rows of data at all. It simply adds each row to the end of the table. Three parameters are ...

With Safari, you learn the way you learn best. Get unlimited access to videos, live online training, learning paths, books, interactive tutorials, and more.

Start Free Trial

No credit card required