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Pro Django

Cover of Pro Django by Marty Alchin Published by Apress
  1. Title Page
  2. Contents at a Glance
  3. Contents
  4. About the Author
  5. Acknowledgments
  6. Preface
  7. Introduction
    1. What This Book Is Not
    2. Who This Book Is For
    3. Interpreting Code Samples
    4. Prerequisites
  8. CHAPTER 1: Understanding Django
    1. Philosophy
    2. Community
    3. Now What?
  9. CHAPTER 2: Django Is Python
    1. How Python Builds Classes
    2. Common Duck-Typing Protocols
    3. Augmenting Functions
    4. Descriptors
    5. Introspection
    6. Applied Techniques
    7. Now What?
  10. CHAPTER 3: Models
    1. How Django Processes Model Classes
    2. Getting Information About Models
    3. Using Model Fields
    4. Subclassing Fields
    5. Dealing with Files
    6. Signals
    7. Applied Techniques
    8. Now What?
  11. CHAPTER 4: URLs and Views
    1. URLs
    2. Views
    3. Applied Techniques
    4. Now What?
  12. CHAPTER 5: Forms
    1. Declaring and Identifying Fields
    2. Binding to User Input
    3. Custom Fields
    4. Defining HTML Behavior
    5. Applied Techniques
    6. Now What?
  13. CHAPTER 6: Templates
    1. What Makes a Template
    2. Context
    3. Retrieving Templates
    4. Adding Features for Templates
    5. Applied Techniques
    6. Now What?
  14. CHAPTER 7: Handling HTTP
    1. Requests and Responses
    2. Writing HTTP Middleware
    3. HTTP-Related Signals
    4. Applied Techniques
    5. Now What?
  15. CHAPTER 8: Backend Protocols
    1. Database Access
    2. Authentication
    3. Files
    4. Session Management
    5. Caching
    6. Template Loading
    7. Context Processors
    8. Applied Techniques
    9. Now What?
  16. CHAPTER 9: Common Tools
    1. Core Exceptions
    2. Text Modification
    3. Data Structures
    4. Functional Utilities
    5. Signals
    6. Now What?
  17. CHAPTER 10: Coordinating Applications
    1. Contacts
    2. Real Estate Properties
    3. Now What?
  18. CHAPTER 11: Enhancing Applications
    1. Recording the Current User
    2. Keeping Historical Records
    3. Now What?
  19. APPENDIX: Contributing to Django
    1. Reporting a Ticket
    2. Supplying a Patch
    3. Writing Tests
    4. Writing Documentation
    5. Development Sprints
    6. Publishing Code
    7. Releasing an Application
  20. Index
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CHAPTER 4URLs and Views

Much of this book is split into fairly self-contained chapters, but this one covers two seemingly unrelated concepts together, because each relies very much on the other. URLs are the primary entry points to your site, while views are the code that respond to incoming events. What goes on in a view is very open-ended. Aside from accepting a request and returning a response, there's no particular protocol that views should adhere to, and no rules about what they are or aren't allowed to do.

The possibilities for views are too vast to consider describing in detail, and there aren't any utilities designed explicitly for views to use while executing. Instead, it's possible to hook into the process Django uses to map Web addresses ...

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