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Principles of the Theory of Solids, Second Edition

Book Description

Professor Ziman's classic textbook on the theory of solids was first pulished in 1964. This paperback edition is a reprint of the second edition, which was substantially revised and enlarged in 1972. The value and popularity of this textbook is well attested by reviewers' opinions and by the existence of several foreign language editions, including German, Italian, Spanish, Japanese, Polish and Russian. The book gives a clear exposition of the elements of the physics of perfect crystalline solids. In discussing the principles, the author aims to give students an appreciation of the conditions which are necessary for the appearance of the various phenomena. A self-contained mathematical account is given of the simplest model that will demonstrate each principle. A grounding in quantum mechanics and knowledge of elementary facts about solids is assumed. This is therefore a textbook for advanced undergraduates and is also appropriate for graduate courses.

Table of Contents

  1. Cover
  2. Title
  3. Dedication
  4. Copyright
  5. Preface
  6. Preface to the second edition
  7. Contents
  8. Chapter 1. Periodic Structures
    1. 1.1 Translational symmetry
    2. 1.2 Periodic functions
    3. 1.3 Properties of the reciprocal lattice
    4. 1.4 Bloch’s theorem
    5. 1.5 Reduction to a Brillouin zone
    6. 1.6 Boundary conditions: counting states
  9. Chapter 2. Lattice Waves
    1. 2.1 Lattice dynamics
    2. 2.2 Properties of lattice waves
    3. 2.3 Lattice sums
    4. 2.4 Lattice specific heat
    5. 2.5 Lattice spectrum
    6. 2.6 Diffraction by an ideal crystal
    7. 2.7 Diffraction by crystal with lattice vibrations
    8. 2.8 Phonons
    9. 2.9 The Debye–Waller factor
    10. 2.10 Anharmonicity and thermal expansion
    11. 2.11 Phonon–phonon interaction
    12. 2.12 Vibrations of imperfect lattices
  10. Chapter 3. Electron States
    1. 3.1 Free electrons
    2. 3.2 Diffraction of valence electrons
    3. 3.3 The nearly-free-electron model
    4. 3.4 The tight-binding method
    5. 3.5 Cellular methods
    6. 3.6 Orthogonalized plane waves
    7. 3.7 Augmented plane waves
    8. 3.8 The Green function method
    9. 3.9 Model pseudo-potentials
    10. 3.10 Resonance bands
    11. 3.11 Crystal symmetry and spin-orbit interaction
  11. Chapter 4. Static Properties of Solids
    1. 4.1 Types of solid: band picture
    2. 4.2 Types of solid: bond picture
    3. 4.3 Cohesion
    4. 4.4 Rigid band model and density of states
    5. 4.5 Fermi statistics of electrons
    6. 4.6 Statistics of carriers in a semiconductor
    7. 4.7 Electronic specific heat
  12. Chapter 5. Electron–Electron Interaction
    1. 5.1 Perturbation formulation
    2. 5.2 Static screening
    3. 5.3 Screened impurities and neutral pseudo-atoms
    4. 5.4 The singularity in the screening: Kohn effect
    5. 5.5 The Friedel sum rule
    6. 5.6 Dielectric constant of a semiconductor
    7. 5.7 Plasma oscillations
    8. 5.8 Quasi-particles and cohesive energy
    9. 5.9 The Mott transition
  13. Chapter 6. Dynamics of Electrons
    1. 6.1 General principles
    2. 6.2 Wannier functions
    3. 6.3 Equations of motion in the Wannier representation
    4. 6.4 The equivalent Hamiltonian: impurity levels
    5. 6.5 Quasi-classical dynamics
    6. 6.6 The mass tensor: electrons and holes
    7. 6.7 Excitons
    8. 6.8 Zener breakdown: tunnelling
    9. 6.9 Electrons at a surface
    10. 6.10 Scattering of electrons by impurities
    11. 6.11 Adiabatic principle
    12. 6.12 Renormalization of velocity of sound
    13. 6.13 The electron–phonon interaction
    14. 6.14 Deformation potentials
  14. Chapter 7. Transport Properties
    1. 7.1 The Boltzmann equation
    2. 7.2 Electrical conductivity
    3. 7.3 Calculation of relaxation time
    4. 7.4 Impurity scattering
    5. 7.5 ‘Ideal’ resistance
    6. 7.6 Carrier mobility
    7. 7.7 General transport coefficients
    8. 7.8 Thermal conductivity
    9. 7.9 Thermo-electric effects
    10. 7.10 Lattice conduction
    11. 7.11 Phonon drag
    12. 7.12 The Hall effect
    13. 7.13 The two-band model: magneto-resistance
  15. Chapter 8. Optical Properties
    1. 8.1 Macroscopic theory
    2. 8.2 Dispersion and absorption
    3. 8.3 Optical modes in ionic crystals
    4. 8.4 Photon–phonon transitions
    5. 8.5 Interband transitions
    6. 8.6 Interaction with conduction electrons
    7. 8.7 The anomalous skin effect
    8. 8.8 Ultrasonic attenuation
  16. Chapter 9. The Fermi Surface
    1. 9.1 High magnetic fields
    2. 9.2 Cyclotron resonance
    3. 9.3 High-field magneto-resistance
    4. 9.4 Open orbits
    5. 9.5 Magneto-acoustic oscillations
    6. 9.6 Quantization of orbits
    7. 9.7 The de Haas–van Alphen effect
    8. 9.8 Magneto-optical absorption
    9. 9.9 Magnetic breakdown
  17. Chapter 10. Magnetism
    1. 10.1 Orbital magnetic susceptibility
    2. 10.2 Spin paramagnetism
    3. 10.3 The Curie–Weiss Law and ferromagnetism
    4. 10.4 Exchange interaction
    5. 10.5 Band ferromagnetism
    6. 10.6 Magnetic impurities
    7. 10.7 Antiferromagnetism
    8. 10.8 The Ising model
    9. 10.9 Combinatorial method
    10. 10.10 Exact solutions of the Ising problem
    11. 10.11 Spin waves
    12. 10.12 The antiferromagnetic ground state
  18. Chapter 11. Superconductivity
    1. 11.1 The attraction between electrons
    2. 11.2 Cooper pairs
    3. 11.3 The superconducting ground state
    4. 11.4 Quasi-particles and the energy gap
    5. 11.5 Temperature dependence of the energy gap
    6. 11.6 Persistent currents
    7. 11.7 The London equation
    8. 11.8 The coherence length
    9. 11.9 Off-diagonal long range order
    10. 11.10 Superconducting junctions
    11. 11.11 Type II material
  19. Bibliography
  20. Index