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Presentation Skills for Quivering Wrecks

Book Description

This book, based on a hugely successful course given to thousands of businesspeople, shows how anyone can speak with confidence to an audience of any size. Laced with humour and wit, the author emphasizes that you don't have to be a brilliant orator to be an effective speaker in business. Simply being "good" is plenty, because 95% of all business presenters are so awful!

Table of Contents

  1. Cover Page
  2. Title Page
  3. Copyright
  4. Contents
  5. Section 1 Introduction
    1. It will be all right on the night
    2. So what? … Why should I? …
    3. Give people the impression you work harder than you do
    4. Save time! (Actually you can't. You can only spend it)
    5. Still with me?
  6. Section 2 The art of “don't worry” for the quivering wreck
    1. “Every day in every way I am getting better and better!”… I am really … I think … or am I?!
    2. This is beyond simple “positive thinking”
    3. Brain proof exercise for skeptics
    4. Yes, if you say so: you're a quivering wreck
    5. Yes, if you say so: you're a fearless presenter
    6. Learn to visualize being a brilliant presenter
    7. External mental practice
    8. Detailed instructions
    9. Internal mental practice
    10. Summary
  7. Section 3 Prior preparation prevents pathetically poor performance
    1. Taking the steps
    2. 1. What is your point and what's the goal?
    3. 2. Who's your audience? (Think of them all as cabbages)
    4. 3. Why that content?
    5. 4. How are you going to close?
    6. 5. How are you going to open?
  8. Section 4 The language of mime — almost
    1. Body language a big part of your 55%
    2. Things not to do with your hands on the platform.
    3. What can you do with your body?
  9. Section 5 I'm a big executive not “an actor” … unfortunately you're wrong
    1. Major change in a moment
    2. So you seriously want to sound like a warm approachable person; here's how
    3. Now would you like to sound like a powerful business leader? Here's how
    4. More rhetorical tricks
  10. Section 6 Ah yes … you probably can't see that at the back
    1. If you must use bullets here are some basic rules:
    2. But be prepared
    3. So what does work on the visual front?
    4. A dollar bill
    5. The chair they're sitting on
    6. An imaginary lemon
    7. Tin cans
    8. A real lemon
    9. Site safety helmet
    10. A chef's tall hat
    11. Set of tools
    12. A candle on a saucer
    13. Bread and butter
    14. Miner's light lamp headband
    15. Large Yellow Pages telephone directory or train timetable
    16. Any surveying or design equipment
    17. Builder's level
    18. Bricks and rocks
    19. Large lunar telescope
    20. Inflatable world
    21. Large beach ball
    22. Large pickle jar
    23. An old fashioned alarm-clock
    24. A muscle worker or exercise weights
    25. Nodding bulldog from the back of a car
    26. Juggling balls
    27. I'm putting on my top hat
    28. A large framed picture of a famous masterpiece with a clear message or theme
    29. A whisk from the kitchen … even an electric food mixer
    30. A wooden spoon
    31. Old-fashioned telephone
    32. A light bulb
    33. A large steel ladle or a massive silver spoon
    34. A long cane (a bean pole from a garden center)
    35. A deck of playing cards
    36. An electric flashlight (torch)
    37. A paper plane
    38. A planted heckler
  11. Section 7 It'll be all right on the night
    1. Script vs notes?
    2. A scripted speech should be set out as follows:
    3. Note cards
    4. Rehearsal rules
    5. And finally: “Q & A”
  12. Section 8 Dealing with the “Clinically Difficult”
    1. Ignore them
    2. Set your limits
    3. Ask them to write their questions
    4. Off line it
    5. Politician it
    6. Be cruel
  13. About the Author