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Practicing Organization Development: Leading Transformation and Change, 4th Edition by Roland L. Sullivan, Jacqueline M. Stavros, William J. Rothwell

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Chapter SixteenLeading Innovative Teams

Jeffrey H. Dyer and W. Gibb Dyer

When you create something that people didn't think could be created, it's never one person. It's always a group.

‒A. G. Lafley, former Chairman and CEO, Procter & Gamble

In our previous chapter in Practicing Organization Development on team building, we outlined the “4Cs” that determine the performance of teams. These are: Context, Composition, Competencies, and Change (Dyer, Dyer, and Dyer 2013). “Context” refers to the organizational factors—leadership, culture, structure, systems, and processes—that either support or undermine teamwork. “Composition” refers to the skills, experience, and motivation of team members and team size. “Competencies” concerns the ability of the team to make decisions, solve problems, deal with conflict, and so forth, while “change” is a team's “meta-competency,” and concerns the team's ability to monitor its performance and make changes—usually in the form of team building—to improve the team's performance.

In this chapter, we focus on the team competency of “innovation.” A key question for team leaders and those that work with them is: “Do you have what it takes to create an innovative team?” Most managers spend little time thinking about this question ...

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