You are previewing Planning for Big Data.

Planning for Big Data

Cover of Planning for Big Data by Edd Dumbill Published by O'Reilly Media, Inc.
  1. Planning for Big Data
  2. Introduction
  3. 1. The Feedback Economy
    1. Data-Obese, Digital-Fast
    2. The Big Data Supply Chain
      1. Data collection
      2. Ingesting and cleaning
      3. Hardware
      4. Platforms
      5. Machine learning
      6. Human exploration
      7. Storage
      8. Sharing and acting
      9. Measuring and collecting feedback
    3. Replacing Everything with Data
    4. A Feedback Economy
  4. 2. What Is Big Data?
    1. What Does Big Data Look Like?
      1. Volume
      2. Velocity
      3. Variety
    2. In Practice
      1. Cloud or in-house?
      2. Big data is big
      3. Big data is messy
      4. Culture
      5. Know where you want to go
  5. 3. Apache Hadoop
    1. The Core of Hadoop: MapReduce
    2. Hadoop’s Lower Levels: HDFS and MapReduce
    3. Improving Programmability: Pig and Hive
    4. Improving Data Access: HBase, Sqoop, and Flume
      1. Getting data in and out
    5. Coordination and Workflow: Zookeeper and Oozie
    6. Management and Deployment: Ambari and Whirr
    7. Machine Learning: Mahout
    8. Using Hadoop
  6. 4. Big Data Market Survey
    1. Just Hadoop?
    2. Integrated Hadoop Systems
      1. EMC Greenplum
      2. IBM
      3. Microsoft
      4. Oracle
      5. Availability
    3. Analytical Databases with Hadoop Connectivity
      1. Quick facts
    4. Hadoop-Centered Companies
      1. Cloudera
      2. Hortonworks
      3. An overview of Hadoop distributions (part 1)
      4. An overview of Hadoop distributions (part 2)
    5. Notes
  7. 5. Microsoft’s Plan for Big Data
    1. Microsoft’s Hadoop Distribution
    2. Developers, Developers, Developers
    3. Streaming Data and NoSQL
    4. Toward an Integrated Environment
    5. The Data Marketplace
    6. Summary
  8. 6. Big Data in the Cloud
    1. IaaS and Private Clouds
    2. Platform solutions
      1. Amazon Web Services
      2. Google
      3. Microsoft
    3. Big data cloud platforms compared
    4. Conclusion
    5. Notes
  9. 7. Data Marketplaces
    1. What Do Marketplaces Do?
    2. Infochimps
    3. Factual
    4. Windows Azure Data Marketplace
    5. DataMarket
    6. Data Markets Compared
    7. Other Data Suppliers
  10. 8. The NoSQL Movement
    1. Size, Response, Availability
    2. Changing Data and Cheap Lunches
    3. The Sacred Cows
    4. Other features
    5. In the End
  11. 9. Why Visualization Matters
    1. A Picture Is Worth 1000 Rows
    2. Types of Visualization
      1. Explaining and exploring
    3. Your Customers Make Decisions, Too
    4. Do Yourself a Favor and Hire a Designer
  12. 10. The Future of Big Data
    1. More Powerful and Expressive Tools for Analysis
    2. Streaming Data Processing
    3. Rise of Data Marketplaces
    4. Development of Data Science Workflows and Tools
    5. Increased Understanding of and Demand for Visualization
  13. About the Author
  14. Copyright

Chapter 3. Apache Hadoop

By Edd Dumbill

Apache Hadoop has been the driving force behind the growth of the big data industry. You’ll hear it mentioned often, along with associated technologies such as Hive and Pig. But what does it do, and why do you need all its strangely-named friends such as Oozie, Zookeeper and Flume?

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Hadoop brings the ability to cheaply process large amounts of data, regardless of its structure. By large, we mean from 10-100 gigabytes and above. How is this different from what went before?

Existing enterprise data warehouses and relational databases excel at processing structured data, and can store massive amounts of data, though at cost. However, this requirement for structure restricts the kinds of data that can be processed, and it imposes an inertia that makes data warehouses unsuited for agile exploration of massive heterogenous data. The amount of effort required to warehouse data often means that valuable data sources in organizations are never mined. This is where Hadoop can make a big difference.

This article examines the components of the Hadoop ecosystem and explains the functions of each.

The Core of Hadoop: MapReduce

Created at Google in response to the problem of creating web search indexes, the MapReduce framework is the powerhouse behind most of today’s big data processing. In addition to Hadoop, you’ll find MapReduce inside MPP and NoSQL databases ...

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