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Picture Yourself Learning Microsoft® Excel® 2010 by Laurie Ulrich Fuller, Deidre Hayes, Jeffery A. Riley

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Creating an Absolute or Mixed Formula Reference

NORMALLY WHEN YOU COPY a formula, the cell addresses in the original formula are adjusted to reflect the new location. For example, if you copy the formula =B8*2.25 from cell B10 to cell C10, the formula automatically changes to =C8*2.25 to reflect the new column to which the formula has been copied.

Sometimes, this automatic adjustment is not what you want to happen. For example, in Figure 2-12, cell C31 contains the total of the monthly college expenses. To determine the percentage of the total expenses that September represents, you might type the formula =C22/C31 in cell D22. However, if you then copy this formula down the column, you’ll soon discover a problem. For example, when you copy the ...

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