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Photoshop® CS4 Bible by Dan Moughamian, Simon Abrams, Stacy Cates

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18.2. Sample Retouching Workflows

To give you some idea of how a basic retouching workflow might look from start to finish, this section details two quick examples of how a typical image might be corrected, using a variety of the tools demonstrated earlier in the chapter. The first example focuses on general retouching, the second on restoring an old image that was scanned into Photoshop. Both examples also make use of some tools you learned earlier in the book, such as the Levels command.

18.2.1. Image retouching

The general progression for retouching an image should follow this pattern once you have completed your initial edits in Adobe Camera Raw (ACR):

  1. Noise reduction

  2. Global tweaks to image tonality and color

  3. Retouching

  4. Output Sharpening

  5. Output (prints, Web, and so on)

For this example, I will assume all work in ACR and all noise reduction has been completed, and all output sharpening and output processes will be handled later. In other words, you're focusing strictly on the Retouching components of the process.

Assuming you have made some useful corrections to your overall color, tonality, and contrast in ACR, and that you have a relatively noise-free image, the first thing to do is make any final corrections or stylistic changes (perhaps to influence the mood of the photo) to the image's tonality.

Figures 18.27 through 18.31 illustrate the progression of your demo image from its original opened state, through final tonal correction, retouching, and then final sharpening.

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