O'Reilly logo

Photographing Yosemite: Digital Field Guide by Lewis Kemper

Stay ahead with the world's most comprehensive technology and business learning platform.

With Safari, you learn the way you learn best. Get unlimited access to videos, live online training, learning paths, books, tutorials, and more.

Start Free Trial

No credit card required

28.3. How Can I Get the Best Shot?

By scouting different locations from the areas adjacent to the chapel and having the proper lenses, filters, and equipment, as well as using the proper settings on your camera, you can create unique images of Yosemite Chapel. Using the proper shutter speed to stop the action of the falling snow in figure 28.1 helped make this image much more exciting.

Figure 28.1. The Yosemite Chapel in a winter snowstorm in late morning. Taken at ISO 400, f/11, 1/125 second with a 100-400mm lens at 180mm.

28.3.1. Equipment

You want to use a variety of lenses when photographing Yosemite Chapel. The addition of a polarizing filter and using your tripod and bubble level will help you get the best images.

28.3.1.1. Lenses

Your wide-angle lenses are most useful when you are getting up close to the chapel and want to include some of the surrounding cliffs in your images. When photographing buildings with wide-angle lenses, you have to worry about distortion from tilting the camera. Try to keep your camera level if you can. If you do a lot of architectural photography, you may want to consider using a tilt-shift lens. These lenses are designed for architectural work, where the front of the lens actually rises so you don't have to tilt the camera. These are specialty lenses and can be rented in some cities. Check camera stores that cater to professionals in major ...

With Safari, you learn the way you learn best. Get unlimited access to videos, live online training, learning paths, books, interactive tutorials, and more.

Start Free Trial

No credit card required