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Phenomenology, Organizational Politics, and IT Design

Book Description

Information systems are researched, published on, and utilized as an extremely broad and vital sector of current technology development, usually studied from the scientific or technological viewpoints therein.<br><b>Phenomenology, Organizational Politics, and IT Design: The Social Study of Information Systems</b> offers a new look at the latest research and critical issues within the field of information systems by creating solid theoretical frameworks and the latest empirical findings of social developments. Professionals, academics, and researchers working with information will find this volume a compelling and vital resource for a cross fertilization among different, yet complementary, and strictly connected domains of scientific knowledge, consisting of information systems research, philosophy of social science, and organizational studies.

Table of Contents

  1. Cover
  2. Title Page
  3. Copyright Page
  4. Editorial Advisory Board and List of Reviewers
    1. Editorial Advisory Board
    2. List of Reviewers
  5. Preface
    1. INTRODUCTION
    2. ON THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN PHENOMENOLOGY AND INFORMATION SYSTEMS RESEARCH
    3. THE USE OF FORMAL REPRESENTATION UNDER A PHENOMENOLOGICAL PERSPECTIVE
    4. ON THE FULLNESS OF SITUATION OR THE BIOGRAPHIC TURN IN THE SOCIAL STUDY OF INFORMATION INFRASTRUCTURES
    5. PLURALISM IN ACTION RESEARCH FOR TECHNO-ORGANIZATIONAL CHANGE
  6. Section 1: Phenomenology and Information Systems Research
    1. Chapter 1: Why Is Information System Design Interested in Ethnography?
      1. ABSTRACT
      2. INFORMATION SYSTEMS AND ETHNOGRAPHY
      3. THE ENGINEERING MENTALITY
      4. FROM THE SYSTEM’S REQUIREMENTS TO THE ‘USER’ AND THE ‘INTERFACE’
      5. WORK COOPERATION AND SOCIALITY
      6. PRACTICES AND ORGANIZATIONS
      7. ETHNOGRAPHY AND INFORMATION SYSTEMS
      8. METIS AND TECHNE
    2. Chapter 2: Experiencing Information Systems Research and Phenomenology
      1. ABSTRACT
      2. INTRODUCTION: SETTING THE QUESTION
      3. THE METHOD ADOPTED: THE INTERPRETATION OF THE RELEVANT WRITINGS
      4. CIBORRA’S PEERS INTERPRETING THE INFLUENCE OF HEIDEGGER ON HIS WRITINGS
      5. HEIDEGGER AND CIBORRA’S THE LABYRINTHS OF INFORMATION
      6. DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSION
    3. Chapter 3: Heidegger’s Notion of Befindlichkeit and the Meaning of “Situated” in Social Inquiries
      1. ABSTRACT
      2. WHAT IS THE BIG DEAL ABOUT IN SITU STUDIES
      3. THE PROBLEM OF OVERCONCEPTUALIZING OR THE LIMITS OF CONOSCENZA TEORETICA
      4. BEFINDLICHKEIT
      5. THE LIMITS OF FORMAL ANALYSIS
      6. CONCLUSION
  7. Section 2: Phenomenology and IT Design
    1. Chapter 4: Communities of Practice from a Phenomenological Stance
      1. ABSTRACT
      2. INTRODUCTION
      3. THE CONCEPT OF COMMUNITY OF PRACTICE
      4. COMMUNITY IN RECENT PHILOSOPHICAL STUDIES
      5. COMMUNITIES OF PRACTICE REVISITED
      6. DESIGNING FOR COMMUNITIES
      7. CONCLUSION
    2. Chapter 5: Knowing and Living as Data Assembly
      1. ABSTRACT
      2. PERCEPTION, COGNITION, COMPUTATION
      3. THE ANALYTIC REDUCTIONISM OF COMPUTATION
      4. THE TECHNOLOGICAL MONITORING OF DAILY LIVING
      5. ADDENDUM ON EMBEDDEDNESS
    3. Chapter 6: “Whatever Works”
      1. ABSTRACT
      2. INTRODUCTION
      3. RETHINKING ABSTRACTIONS OF WORK
      4. RECONCILING SCYLLA AND CHARYBDIS ON ARTIFACTS
      5. TWO SIDES OF THE SAME COIN
      6. ALL A MATTER OF DIFFERENT PURPOSES
      7. SOME CASES FROM HEALTHCARE WORK
      8. WHAT INFORMATION QUALITY TELLS OF INFORMATION
      9. DESIGNING SUPPORT TO MAKE SENSE OF INFORMATION
      10. IN LIEU OF A CONCLUSION
    4. Chapter 7: About Representational Artifacts and Their Role in Engineering
      1. ABSTRACT
      2. INTRODUCTION
      3. ENGINEERING AS A DESIGN PROCESS
      4. REPRESENTATIONAL ARTIFACTS
      5. CASE ARCHCOM: A MULTIMEDIA COMPANY
      6. ANALYSIS AND DISCUSSION OF REPRESENTATIONAL ARTIFACTS AT ARCHCOM
      7. CHIPCOM: AN ENGINEERING COMPANY
      8. ANALYSIS AND DISCUSSION OF REPRESENTATIONAL ARTIFACTS AT CHIPCOM
      9. CONCLUSION
    5. Chapter 8: Representations, Institutions, and IS Design
      1. ABSTRACT
      2. INTRODUCTION
      3. THE LICHTUNG
      4. REPRESENTATIONS, INSTITUTIONS, AND IS DESIGN
      5. METH-ODOS: CHALLENGING THE ARCHIVE
      6. CONCLUSION
  8. Section 3: Phenomenology and the Social Study of Information Systems
    1. Chapter 9: Studying Information Infrastructures
      1. ABSTRACT
      2. INTRODUCTION
      3. FROM SYSTEMS TO INFORMATION INFRASTRUCTURES
      4. STUDYING INFORMATION INFRASTRUCTURE: AN EXAMPLE FROM THE MOBILE PHONE CONTENT INDUSTRY IN NORWAY
      5. HOW TO STUDY INFORMATION INFRASTRUCTURES
    2. Chapter 10: Prioritizing Packaged Software Implementation Projects
      1. ABSTRACT
      2. INTRODUCTION
      3. ENTERPRISE RESOURCE PLANNING MIGRATES TO HIGHER EDUCATION
      4. CURRENT EMPHASIS ON FIT AND THE SIGNIFICANCE OF GAPS
      5. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS
      6. CONCLUSION AND DISCUSSION
    3. Chapter 11: The Role of Management Consultants in Long-Term ERP Customization Trajectories
      1. ABSTRACT
      2. INTRODUCTION
      3. LITERATURE REVIEW
      4. THEORETICAL FRAMEWORK
      5. RESEARCH METHODOLOGY
      6. CASE DESCRIPTION AND ANALYSIS
      7. DISCUSSION
      8. CONCLUSION
    4. Chapter 12: Accumulation and Erosion of User Representations or How is Situated Design Interaction Situated1
      1. ABSTRACT
      2. INTRODUCTION
      3. BIOGRAPHIES OF TECHNOLOGIES AND PRACTICES APPROACH
      4. RESEARCHING USER REPRESENTATIONS IN DESIGN PROCESSES
      5. THE SOURCES AND ACCUMULATION OF USER REPRESENTATIONS: AN ERROR-FREE ALARM BUTTON
      6. EROSION OF FEATURES WITHIN AND BETWEEN DESIGN PROCESSES
      7. DISCUSSION
    5. Chapter 13: Strategic Ethnography and the Biography of Artefacts
      1. ABSTRACT
      2. INTRODUCTION
      3. SOME SHORTCOMINGS OF EXISTING RESEARCH INTO TECHNOLOGY AND WORK ORGANIZATION
      4. THE NEED FOR NEW KINDS OF RESEARCH PERSPECTIVES
      5. THE BIOGRAPHY OF ARTEFACTS PERSPECTIVE
      6. THE BIOGRAPHY OF ENTERPRISE RESOURCE PLANNING (ERP) SYSTEMS
      7. TOWARDS A BIOGRAPHY OF e-INFRASTRUCTURES
      8. SOME RECENT CONCEPTS FOR ANALYSING e-INFRASTRUCTURES
      9. APPLYING THESE CONCEPTS TO ANALYSING HEALTH INFRASTRUCTURES
      10. CONCLUSION
  9. Section 4: Phenomenology, Organizational Politics, and Organizational Design
    1. Chapter 14: The Horizons of Experience
      1. ABSTRACT
      2. INTRODUCTION
      3. RATIONALITY AND THE HUMAN PSYCHE (REASON AND PERCEPTION)
      4. MEANINGS ATTRIBUTED TO HORIZON
      5. THE CORRELATES OF HORIZON
      6. UNDERSTANDING: PHENOMENA APPEARING WITHIN OUR HORIZON
      7. CONCEPTUALIZATION
      8. UNDERSTANDING RATIONAL SUBJECTS AND IRRATIONAL OBJECTS
      9. POSSIBILITIES FOR RESEARCHING INFORMATION SYSTEMS
      10. CONCLUSION
    2. Chapter 15: Social Practice Design
      1. ABSTRACT
      2. INTRODUCTION
      3. SOCIAL PRACTICE DESIGN
      4. DISCUSSION
      5. CONCLUSION
    3. Chapter 16: IS-Related Organizational Change and the Necessity of Techno-Organizational Co-Design(-In-Use)
      1. ABSTRACT
      2. INTRODUCTION
      3. SCENARIO
      4. TECHNO-ORGANIZATIONAL CHANGE AND RESISTANCE
      5. TECHNO-ORGANIZATIONAL CO-DESIGN(-IN-USE) AND ACTION RESEARCH
      6. CONCLUSION
    4. Chapter 17: A Drifting Service Development
      1. ABSTRACT
      2. INTRODUCTION
      3. METHODOLOGY OF SOCIOTECHNICAL WALKTHROUGH
      4. PENBASED SERVICES FOR ELDERLY PEOPLE
      5. OCCURRENCE OF DRIFT
      6. CONCLUSION
    5. Chapter 18: Organizational Learning and Action Research
      1. ABSTRACT
      2. INTRODUCTION
      3. SOCIAL CHANGE IN A NON-DUALISTIC AND PROCESSUAL CONCEPTION
      4. ORGANIZATIONAL LEARNING, ACTION RESEARCH, AND ORGANIZATIONAL CHANGE IN A NON-DUALISTIC AND PROCESSUAL CONCEPTION
      5. A CASE OF ACTION RESEARCH
      6. DISCUSSION
      7. FUTURE (ACTION) RESEARCH DIRECTIONS
      8. CONCLUSION
  10. Compilation of References
  11. About the Contributors
  12. Index