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Personal Data Privacy and Protection in a Surveillance Era

Book Description

Personal Data Privacy and Protection in a Surveillance Era: Technologies and Practices spans a number of interdependent and emerging topics in the area of legal protection of privacy and technology. This book explores the new threats that cyberspace poses to the privacy of individuals, as well as the threats that surveillance technologies generate in public spaces and in digital communication. It examines media practices and privacy frameworks in the fields of copyright, digital management and genetic information. New models of data protection are proposed along with their advantages and disadvantages.

Table of Contents

  1. Cover
  2. Title Page
  3. Copyright Page
  4. Editorial Advisory Board and List of Reviewers
    1. Editorial Advisory Board
    2. List of Reviewers
  5. Preface
    1. The privacy-technology dilemma in the age of digital surveillance
  6. Acknowledgment
  7. Section 1: Privacy, Identity and Personality in a World of Digital Technology
    1. Chapter 1: Privacy and Identity in a Networked World
      1. ABSTRACT
      2. Introduction
      3. I. Adapting old tools and techniques to safeguard privacy online
      4. II. privacy in public information
      5. Conclusion
    2. Chapter 2: The Right to Privacy and the Right to Identity in the Age of Ubiquitous Computing
      1. ABSTRACT
      2. Introduction
      3. I. The Doctrinal “State-of-Art” in the Conceptualization of the Right to Privacy and the Right to Identity: The Inflation of the former and the deflation of the latter
      4. II.Identity and Privacy: an ambiguous and dynamic relationship
      5. III.Right to Identity and Right to Privacy: Commonalities and Differences (Common Roots, Different Interests)
      6. IV.Right to Privacy and Right to Identity within the EU Data Protection legal framework: Personal Data and the Alethic criterion
      7. V.The challenges of Ubiquitous Computing
      8. Conclusion
    3. Chapter 3: Hasta La Vista Privacy, Or How Technology Terminated Privacy
      1. ABSTRACT
      2. I. Introduction
      3. II. The Deterministic Interaction of Technology and Privacy
      4. III. A New Mind Frame for Privacy in the Digital World
      5. IV. Conclusion
  8. Section 2: Defining the Private and the Public: Political Anonymity and the Technology of Security and Surveillance
    1. Chapter 4: The Electronic Surveillance of Public Assemblies
      1. ABSTRACT
      2. I. INTRODUCTION: The electronic surveillance of public assemblies
      3. II. The electronic surveillance of public assemblies: the Greek constitutional guarantees [Articles 9A and 11]
      4. III. The electronic surveillance of public assemblies: the constitutionality of the Law 3625/2007 (Art. 8)
      5. IV. The electronic surveillance of public assemblies in Europe: the jurisprudence of the European Court of Human Rights
      6. V. CONCLUSION
    2. Chapter 5: Telecommunications Interception in Turkey
      1. ABSTRACT
      2. I. Introduction
      3. II. Regulation of Telecommunication Interceptions by Law: Turkey and the World
      4. III. A Brief Look at the Political Stage
      5. IV. The Security of Bio-power and a Society of Discipline: Foucauldian Analysis
      6. V. Conclusion
    3. Chapter 6: Surveillance in Public Spaces as a Means of Protecting Security
      1. ABSTRACT
      2. I. INTRODUCTION: Questions of Legitimacy and Policy
      3. II. Surveillance in Public Spaces and the European Public Order
      4. d. CONCLUSION
  9. Section 3: Genetics, Medical Technology and Its Threats to Privacy, Individual Autonomy and Freedom
    1. Chapter 7: Genetic Privacy
      1. ABSTRACT
      2. I. Introduction: Is Genetic Privacy An Individualist Right After All?
      3. II. The Unique Character of Genetic Information and Its Connection to Identity and Autonomy
      4. III. Protecting Genetic Information between the Individual, the Family and the Public Interest
      5. IV. The ‘Constitution’ of Genetic Privacy: Control, Consent and determinism in genetic information
      6. V. The ethical grounds for genetic privacy: between autonomy and paternalism
      7. VI. An individual’s right to genetic privacy on the basis of care
      8. VII. Conclusion
    2. Chapter 8: Autonomy, Abortion and Pain Criteria
      1. ABSTRACT
      2. I. Introduction
      3. II.Everlasting Discussion: Abortion and the “beginning of life” criterion
      4. III. A woman’s Right to Privacy vs. the unborn child’s Right to Life; An Unfair Proposition
      5. IV.Is the Fetus Left Unprotected For The Sake of the Woman’s Liberation?
      6. V. What Kind of Protection do we need for the Woman and the Fetus?
      7. VI. The Fetus’s Pain as a Restrictive Criterion for Abortion
    3. Chapter 9: Balancing the Protection of Genetic Data and National Security in the Era of New Technology
      1. ABSTRACT
      2. I. Introduction
      3. II.The right to personal data protection under the ECHR
      4. III.The collection of GENETIC data under the ECHR
      5. IV. GENETIC data retention under the ECHR: the principle of proportionality between private and public interests
      6. V. Conclusion
      7. APPENDIX: TABLE OF CASES
  10. Section 4: The ‘Targeted’ Privacy: Ambient Technology and Tagging
    1. Chapter 10: Radio Frequency Identification in Hospitals
      1. ABSTRACT
      2. Introduction
      3. I. The Benefits and Costs of RFID in Hospitals
      4. II. Privacy Principles, Constraints, and Considerations
      5. III. Legal Considerations
      6. IV. Introduction of Hospital RFID Applications
      7. V. Conclusion and Recommendations
      8. APPENDIX: SUMMARY OF RECOMMENDATIONS
    2. Chapter 11: Privacy Expectations in Passive RFID Tagging of Motor Vehicles
      1. ABSTRACT
      2. I. INTRODUCTION
      3. II. BACKGROUND ON THE LTO IT PROJECT AND THE PASSIVE RFID TAGGING OF MOTOR VEHICLES
      4. III. THE PRIVACY CHALLENGE IN BAYAN MUNA ET AL. v. MENDOZA ET AL. TO PASSIVE RFID TAGGING OF MOTOR VEHICLES
      5. IV. CONCLUSION
    3. Chapter 12: Ambient Intelligence
      1. ABSTRACT
      2. INTRODUCTION
      3. 1. The ambient intelligent (AmI) environment. Opportunities and legal issues
      4. 2. Privacy and Data Protection: Concepts and legal categories
      5. 3. Current regulation and limits
      6. 4. Privacy vs security issues
      7. Conclusion
  11. Section 5: Privacy Policies in the Network: Children’s Privacy and the Protection of Copyright
    1. Chapter 13: Privacy policy Improvements to Protect Children Privacy
      1. ABSTRACT
      2. 1. CHILDREN ON THE INTERNET: NAIVE AND TECHNO-SAVVY
      3. 2. CHILDREN PRIVACY AS A POLICY OBJECTIVE
      4. 3. PRIVACY POLICIES: USEFUL TOOLS TO ENHANCE TRUST
      5. 4. ANALYSIS OF THE PRIVACY POLICIES
      6. 5. CONCLUSION
      7. APPENDIX: PRIVACY POLICIES (ALL RETRIEVED MAY 1ST, 2010)
    2. Chapter 14: Digital Copyright Enforcement
      1. ABSTRACT
      2. I. INTRODUCTION
      3. II. BACKGROUND
      4. III. PRIVACY AND THE RIGHT TO INFORMATIONAL SELF-DETERMINATION
      5. IV. DIGITAL COPYRIGHT ENFORCEMENT SURVEILLANCE MECHANISMS
      6. V. THE GRADUATED RESPONSE: AN ALTERNATIVE ENFORCEMENT MECHANISM
      7. VI. AN OPEN CONCLUSION
  12. Section 6: Data Protection and Privacy in Europe and in the European Union
    1. Chapter 15: The EC Data Retention Directive
      1. ABSTRACT
      2. I. INTRODUCTION
      3. II. Background of the Data Retention Directive
      4. III. Legislative Basis of the Directive
      5. IV. THE MAIN PROVISIONS OF THE DIRECTIVE
      6. V. DATA PROTECTION & PRIVACY CONCERNS
      7. VI. Solutions & Recommendations
      8. VII. CONCLUSION
    2. Chapter 16: Data Protection in EU Law
      1. ABSTRACT
      2. 1. Introduction
      3. 2. The EU data protection regime
      4. 3. The external dimension of data protection: transfer of data to third countries
      5. 4. Conclusion
      6. APPENDIX: TABLE OF CASES
    3. Chapter 17: Cross-Border Transfer of Personal Data
      1. ABSTRACT
      2. 1. INTRODUCTION
      3. 2. BACKGROUND OF ROMANIAN DATA PROTECTION LAW
      4. 3. RESTRICTIONS AND REQUIREMENTS IN RELATION TO THE CROSS-BORDER TRANSFER OF PERSONAL DATA
      5. 5. CONCLUSION
    4. Chapter 18: The implementation of the Data Retention Directive
      1. ABSTRACT
      2. I. INTRODUCTION
      3. II. ComparATIVE Overview of the implementation of THE Data Retention Directive in The Member States
      4. III. Conclusion
      5. APPENDIX: LEGISLATION
  13. Compilation of References
  14. About the Contributors
  15. Index