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Peer-to-Peer by Andy Oram

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Third-party trust issues in Publius

Besides trusting the operators of the Publius servers and proxies, users of Publius may have to place trust in other parties. Fortunately some tools exist that reduce the amount of trust that must be placed in these parties.

Other anonymity tools

While not perfect, anonymizing proxies can hide your IP address from a Publius server or a particular web site. As previously stated, the anonymizing proxy itself could be keeping logs.

In addition, your Internet service provider (ISP) can monitor all messages you send over the Internet. An anonymizing proxy doesn’t help us with this problem. Instead, we need some way of hiding all communication from the ISP. Cryptography helps us here. All traffic (messages) between you and another computer can be encrypted. Now the ISP sees only encrypted traffic, which looks like gibberish. The most popular method of encrypting web traffic is the Secure Sockets Layer (SSL) Protocol.

SSL

SSL allows two parties to create a private channel over the Internet. In our case this private channel can be between a Publius client and a server. All traffic to and from the Publius client and server can be encrypted. This hides everything from the ISP except the fact that you are talking to a Publius server. The ISP can see the encrypted channel setup messages between the Publius client and server. Is there a way to hide this piece of information too? It turns out there is.

Mix networks

Mix networks are systems for hiding both the content ...

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