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Peer-to-Peer by Andy Oram

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Gnutella’s analogues

The first thing that technologists say when they think about how Gnutella works is, “It can’t possibly scale.” But that is simply not the case. Gnutella is an unconventional system and as such requires unconventional metrics. Millions of users may be using Gnutella simultaneously, but they will not all be visible to one another. That is the basic nature of a public, purely peer-to-peer network. Because there is no way to guarantee the quality of service throughout the network, it is impossible to guarantee that every node on the network can be reached by every other node on the network. In spite of that, Gnutella has many existing analogues.

Of all the analogues that exist, the most interesting two are cellular telephony and Ethernet.

The Gnutella horizon

In Gnutella, there is a concept of a horizon. This is simply a restatement of the effect the TTL has on how far a packet can go before it dies, the attenuation of ripples on a pond. Gnutella’s standard horizon is seven hops. That means that from where you stand, you can see out seven hops. How far is that? Typically, a seven-hop radius combined with network conditions means about ten thousand nodes are within sight.

When Gnutella was younger, and the pond analogy hadn’t yet crossed my mind, I explained this effect as a horizon, because it was just like what happens when you are at the beach and the world seems to disappear after some distance (approximately five kilometers if you’re two meters tall). Of course, ...

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